Saturday, 16 July 2016

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day July 2016

I had been hoping that my roses would be in bloom for this month's Bloom Day Post.  It was a bit touch and go there as temperatures dropped again.  The thermostat as been down to single figures on a few occasions of late.  That's a good old Scottish summer for you!      

It's been a while since I shared the front garden with you all so I thought it would be as good a place to start as any.  Some of you will remember I followed the front garden for 12 months last year.  Planting is now in it's second year and I am extremely pleased with how it all looks.  There has been a few wee tweaks here and there since I last posted about it.  Below is the view from the living room window.  Let me tell you those milk chocolate foxgloves are a haven for bees        

Digitalis parviflora Milk Chocolate in the foreground

The view is equally good as you come in the front gate.  



You can make out the Tropaeolum speciosum doing it's thing through the hedge (excuse the missing section of trellising - I just haven't got round to replacing it yet).  Both Rosa Hot Chocolate and Hemerocallis Golden Chimes were added nearer the tail end of last summer.  For the life of me I can't remember just which plants they replaced.  Obviously nothing memorable.

Taking a step or two closer for a better look, Achillea Inca Gold looks rather good sandwiched between two roses I think.  I planted a sumptuous late flowering red peony to contrast here but it turned out to be wrongly labelled and bloomed white. The peony will be rehomed elsewhere in autumn and I'll try again next year.  I'll be wise enough to wait until I can see the plant in bloom though.

Rosa Lady of Shallot, Achillea Inca Gold and Rosa Fighting Temeraire  

My favourite newbie in the garden this year is this beautiful martagon Lily.  I shall definitely be adding more of these come autumn time.
Lilium martagon Arabian Nights

My favourite rose may have been incredibly slow to get going this year but it seems now to be getting a wriggle on.  R. The Lark Ascending is an incredibly healthy rose.  I love the form of it's blooms. The suggested light fragrance I just can't get but I am happy to forgive it this one fault.

Rosa The Lark Ascending
      
From the warm shades of the front garden to the cooler shades of the summer border situated near the back door.  As you can see the summer border truly is full to bursting.  Just how I like my borders.  It is a pleasure to sit here and catch scents from around the garden and listen to the bees buzzing and the birds feeding their young.  I note that butterflies are conspicuous by their absence this year.

As you can see I am not one of those gardeners that believe roses should be in beds on their own.  I much prefer them mingling and surrounded by friends. The soil having been improved over the years I feel is rich enough to provide the needs for all the plants growing here.  This border is rarely watered and the only plants that ever receive food of any sort are the roses.  The rest are pretty much left to get on with it.  Gardening like this also helps to keep the weeds down.      


The summer border July 2016
A close up of just a few of the plants blooming in the summer border this week.

Rosa Rhapsody in Blue, Sanguisorba Pink Tanna, Clematis The Vagabond

Rosa Darcy Bussell and Salvia Kate Glen

NOID Erigeron

Geranium pratense Plenum Album

Deutzie Strawberry Fields
Phlox paniculata Violet flame, Nepeta Blue Danube, Geranium psilostemon, Salvia Kate Glen and Erigeron

Geranium robustum, Sanguisorba Pink Tanna and Peony Fragrant Pink Imp



Clematis viticella Mme Julia Correvon.  Clematis texensis Princess of Wales is in there too and will flower soon.

Filling the gap created when I fell into this border.  Some low growing Cosmos.
Cosmos Sonata - white and carmine and Campanula poscharskyana

No garden should be without a scented Philadelphus in my opinion.  You don't need to get up close and personal with P. Belle Etoile.  This particular one copes with copious amounts of water through winter and spring it is often waterlogged at those times of the year.  No matter where you are in the garden you know she's in bloom.  Her scent is heavenly.  Teamed up here beneath the Rowan tree with Ligularia The Rocket.

Ligularia The Rocket and Philadelphus Belle Etoile 

Buddleja globosa currently tucked behind some perennial sunflowers.  I am hoping that next year it will be tall enough to be seen from the front of the border rather than from behind.

Buddleja globosa
For three years now I've been meaning to move this globeflower and each year I forget to do it.  I grows tall reaching from beneath the Cornus and Photinia towards the sun.  It doesn't seem to mind the predicament it has found itself in though.

Trollius chinensis Golden Queen
Allium giganteum
I need to grow Agapanthus in pots here.  The first of those to flower this year is the tender Agapanthus africanus.  When they finally get going I bring them down nearer the house so I can enjoy them more.

Agapanthus africanus with Helenium, Veronicastrum and Persicaria in the background.
In the shadier Enkianthus bed there is not so much going on right now.  Hostas will bloom in a few weeks but right now, one of my favourites and the first ever plant I bought especially for this garden is this creamy white flowering monkshood.  The surrounding greenery really makes this plant stand out.

Aconitum napellus Gletschereis
The last blooms I am sharing with you this post are down in the side garden.  I am so glad I took this shot the other day because now the Aconitums are almost horizontal from the winds we were experiencing last night.  Both plants do grow taller than they should because of the shade they receive.

Aconitum x cammarun Stainless Steel and Peony Sarah Bernhardt

I'd like to leave you on a personal note.  I want to thank everyone for the incredibly kind emails and notes I have received from some of you over this past few weeks.  You know who you are!  My recent bout of ill health, later finish from work in the mornings and child minding Olli is not so much taking their toll but leaving me little time to enjoy gardening, reading, posting and commenting on blogs.  I do pop in from time to time to read some of your posts and although I may only comment on the odd post or two I still enjoy reading what's been happening in your part of the world.  I only hope normal service from Angie's Garden will resume soon since I am on leave from work week after next for a fortnight.  We have decided not to go away and I am forever hopeful that summer may finally arrive here in Scotland so we can enjoy being here at home.  Thank you all for your support and best wishes. Angie.

33 comments:

  1. What a floriferous treat! It's hard to pick out favourites, I would be here all night. Your garden is a real credit to you Angie.
    I put my 'Lark' in the wrong place and it's about to endure a move. Yes, I know it's the wrong time of year but it's also a relatively cool year so I'm hoping I'll get away with it. She hasn't been planted that long either so probably won't even notice?!

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    1. Jessica I move plants all the time and that providing you keep up with watering you won't have an issue.
      Thanks for the lovely comments too.

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  2. Hi Angie, finally catching up with blog reading, I hope you are feeling better and will get some time in the garden in the sun when you are on holiday. Your colour combinations and plantings get better and better, it' all looking very lovely. My roses aren't out either, and when they finally d I suspect they will get blasted by the rain and wind, oh dear. Take care, happy gardening :)

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    1. The wind was pretty bad here last night and continues today Rona so much so I've had to get out there with stakes and string. I hope it was a tad better over the hills.

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  3. Hi Angie,

    Lovely to see your garden again; everything is looking very well. Those foxgloves look very happy where they are! I lost all my straw foxgloves this winter and are hoping the seed i have saved are still viable. (I lost a few plants this year although it was a non-winter with no snow settling).

    I hope you have a lovely time off and feel better soon

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    1. Hello Stranger :) I hope you are well. I do hope those seeds are viable - such a shame to loose plants when the weather isn't so cold. I feel your pain!

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  4. Wonderful, beautiful blooms!

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    1. Thank you Lea. Your compliments are appreciated.

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  5. Your garden is my idea of heaven, Angie! If I got a chance to plunk down in that chair in your summer border, I expect you'd have a very hard time getting me to leave. I LOVE your color combinations and wish a had a fraction of your success with roses, not to mention lilies. I won't even mention the peonies, as they're only a dream here in my climate.

    I'm sorry to hear that the health problems you mentioned in your June post hung on and that you're being stretched in all directions. I hope things ease up soon and you can truly enjoy your glorious garden. And, while I'm sending good wishes, I hope you get some nice warm summer days too!

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    1. Our climate here would be a real shock to your system Kris - I could see you sitting there with a woolen hat and gloves sipping a hot cup of coffee.
      Thank you for those wishes - they truly are appreciated.

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  6. Dear Angie, I so enjoyed seeing photos from your garden! It looks absolutely spectacular at this time of the year and as always your plant combinations are superb!
    You are writing "I had been hoping that my roses would be in bloom for this month's Bloom Day Post", which I don't get, since they DO bloom in your images, but maybe you mean that they would be at the peak of their flush? Anyway, from the ones that you are featuring individually I especially like 'The Lark Ascending' and 'Rhapsody in Blue'. I have loved lavender colored roses for a long time, but lately I am getting into the very pale yellows and apricots, too. There are so many roses that I would still like to grow in my own garden...
    One plant that really made me gasp is it not a rose though, it is the Lilium martagon 'Arabian Nights'. What a stunning bloom, no wonder that you would like to add more of these to your garden.
    Hope all obstacles that are in the way of enjoying your garden to the fullest will be removed for you in the near future and you can spend plenty of time in the green paradise that you have created.
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. Yes, I spent the last few weeks watching those buds develop and hope they would be full of flower for this month's post Christina but that is not the case blooms are rather sparse. I have bought some organic rose feed today and will give all my roses a treat tomorrow to see if I can give them a bit of help. Am I asking too much from roses that have only been in the ground for 2 years I wonder.
      Olli is now walking and takes a lot out of me in the afternoons. I am feeling twice my age most days!
      As always your compliments are much appreciated - thank you.

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  7. Wow Angie! Your gardens are looking beautiful with such a selection of flowers. It's hard to pick a favorite photo but I would have to narrow it down to the view from the front gate and the summer border. I just want to sit right down in that chair and take it all in. Thanks for the virtual tour!

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    1. Thank you Lee. I am all too expert at sitting down at that chair although not always to take everything in - more of passing a critical eye!

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  8. Your front garden is amazing, so well co-ordinated, but then, so is your back garden! All your plants look so happy, they must enjoy your Scottish climate! I wouldn't know which plants to pick out, they are all wonderful.
    I hope you are soon back to full health, have a restful holiday.

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    1. Thank you Pauline. Achieving that colour scheme going in the front garden is proving a challenge but I think now I can probably stop buying plants and increase what's already growing to achieve cohesion.

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  9. I have fallen behind with blog reading Angie, it is partly the time of year, health and other commitments. I think your garden looks great, just my style, every where packed with plants. Enjoy it during your leave.

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    1. I sure intend to Brian - although there is also a bit of a project planned too.

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  10. You must be pleased (well as pleased as any gardener ever is with their own garden), it looks really beautiful. Wonderful combinations. Particularly like the apricot roses with the achillea.

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    1. That's exactly right Jade. Thank you.

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  11. Beautiful - and those chocolate foxgloves are really different!
    All so summery, despite the wet weather :)

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    1. Thank you Pat. I also owe you an apology for not keeping up with Tree Following.

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  12. Your garden looks amazing, I love the way you have combined the colours and plants. Such a beautiful variety!All the best!

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  13. Magnificent garden, I almost envy your Digitalis parviflora, wonderful.

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  14. Your garden looks absolutely fabulous, Angie - and I do so admire your eye for colour combinations, both flower and foliage. That shot of Achillea with Lady of Shalott is wonderful! Everything is coming together so nicely, and of course I always look with an extra gleam in my eye, noticing the speed with which you've gotten your borders established ;-) and hoping I can manage to do the same though a few years behind you! I do hope you have a wonderful time enjoying the garden, and feeling good too :)

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  15. Angie your garden is looking wonderful front and back, I hope you get the time and weather to sit on the seat and enjoy relaxing in it, so many beautiful blooms I don't know where to start, I think the roses and achellia look beautiful and the martagon lily too, the summer border is gorgeous and I am finding plants seem to grow better when packed in close as if they like the company, Frances

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  16. Angie, I liked this Digitalis parviflora Milk Chocolate, I should have it in my garden as well. I also love a view of your garden, very colorful, really summer although rainy and temps drop every week. The same summer we have, but I think our plants are used to this weather, aren't they?
    I hope you're better now, enjoy summer warm days in your garden.

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  17. Hasn't your front garden come along well. What a great job you have done and what a treat it must be to enjoy now.

    I don't really understand roses being in their own rose beds. They look much nicer intermingled with other plants as you have done.

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  18. I hope you are basking in hot sunshine and high temperatures by now Angie – hopefully the good weather will last into your holiday :-)
    Your front garden is a testament to careful planning, how lovely it looks! And I so agree with you on how to plant roses – they look best together with other types of plants. Darcy Bussell is on my wish-list – if I can find a place for her, and every time I see your trollies I remind myself I really want some! How long have you had your Deutzia? How big is it now? I have seen ‘Strawberry Fields’ described as 2m tall and wide – which has put me off it a bit, but there is a smaller variety called 'Yuki Cherry Blossom' which I have on my ever growing wish-list.

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    1. Thanks Helene. The Deutzia is around 5ft tall now. It's difficult to tell exactly since the stems arch out. It's around the same height as me if I push the tallest branches up straight, so yes 5ft. That's 1.5m in new money. The one you mention is gorgeous and obviously a lot shorter. Very nice!

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  19. What a glorious garden you have. Absolutely a treat. But do you have to deadhead them so that they flower again? I find that many of the plants here bloom but don't bloom again. And the plants just stand tall without any flowers.

    I also garden like you -- all put in together with hardly any space in between and never watered.

    I hope you will get well soon.

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    1. Thank you KL - I dead head many plants but not them all. I also cut many back to the ground so they regenerate and bloom a second time. It's all trial and error with some and with mixed results too. Hardy geraniums are particularly good at blooming twice in the one year here.

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  20. Your front garden is looking a treat Angie. Some great plants and well thought out colour combinations. I hope that you've had some time to sit in that chair near the trellis to admire the view and appreciate all the scent in the air.

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