Tuesday, 31 May 2016

End of Month View May 2016

Having spent a glorious long weekend in the garden I am not feeling guilty one single bit for taking time out to join Helen and other garden bloggers over at the Patient Gardener to post my End of Month View.

Pottering around in the garden this weekend I have been taking stock, particularly in the largest of the two borders I am following this year.  This bed gets far more sun than I had realised before.  This just goes to show that I haven't been paying too much attention to this bed.  My planting really does reflect this. There are at least 37 different plants in here, not counting spring bulbs and Hellebores she declares embarrassingly.  While some plants have been deliberately placed others have I suppose you could say have just been plonked in here.  Is it any wonder I am unhappy with it all?  It's just all too mish mash.  Herein lies my dilemma!  Just what to get rid off?

End of May 2016

Anemone trulifolia 
I think the way forward with this area is to work on repeating more of individual plants.  One such plant I want more off is the very gorgeous Anemone trulifolia, I like it paired with the yellow Lamium. Having made my mind up about this the other day I have removed the clump of bulbs that have come up blind this last two year and the over sized (for this particular spot) daffodils.  I have purchased new plants but want to make sure they flower with pale blue blooms rather than white before I get them in the ground.  Thus far 2 out of 5 pots have bloomed blue, so all good there.  This little anemone bloomed for most of the summer last year so worth adding more since if obviously is happy where it is planted.

Pulmonaria with Bergenia and Epimedium
Towards the Cotinus (I am not mentioning it's lack of foliage again this month) a mass of foliage with some Solomon's Seal and Pulmonaria that are blooming righ now.  Later the Hostas in here will take over when the others have had a cut back.  Next to bloom here will be the Heuchera, Camassi and Polemonium.  The Pulmonaria is another I've decided to get rid of.  It is in dire need of being chopped back too but the bees are still buzzing around it and I haven't the heart to do that quite yet.  I need though to decide whether or not to plant some more Bergenia (too the left) or Epimedium (too the right) in it's place.  The Epimedium I suspect will win the day purely because it shouldn't grow as tall as the Bergenia and it won't smother the blue Corydalis.

Beneath the arch May 2016
As planned I will use these months wisely to deliberate over just which plants are keepers and which will be issued their marching orders.

From the back step May 2016
Through the arch, the Enkianthus bed certainly has filled out.  Like the bed above it needs a bit of reorganisation.  I am trying my damnedest to let the plants do their own thing this year.  Regular readers will know just how hard I am finding it.  In the past I've been extremely guilty of ripping out plants in their prime and then having to molly coddle them in pots until they make a recovery.  I am trying to lighten my load not add to it so have decided that they are better off in the ground even if they are a bit cramped.

I have taken this shot at a slightly different angle, you can catch my gist better from this spot.  The candelabra Primula (P. japonica Miller's Crimson) are just coming into bloom as is Corydalis Heavenly Blue.  The Enkianthus is sporadically producing blooms at the moment.  I wonder if the late frost done more damage than I thought it had.  I can't say I have noticed previously that late frosts hamper this shrub from blooming.
 
 
The Gillentia trifoliata never did reappear.  On checking around in the soil there is no sign of it what so ever, not even a hint of a root ball.  I have no idea just what I did wrong, it seemed like the perfect spot for it.  I have already purchased replacements for it's spot.  I am hoping they are less fussy. Trollius x cultorum New Moon is more compact than the other taller varieties I grow here.  I hope they like their new home.

Corydalis Heavenly Blue and Trollius x cultorum New Moon
Lastly, a close up off the candelabra Primula.  Really just to remind me that I could do with finding something to grow in front of these to distract they eye when they go over.

Thanks for reading.  I hope your week is a good one.

20 comments:

  1. Amazing such a variety of plants you have in your garden.

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    1. Thanks Janneke - I can't help but think too much variety at times. I am working on rectifying that though.

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  2. You are such a good analytical gardener Angie! I feel terribly gung ho about my gardening when I read your posts, and they are a good aide- memoire to me to think more and plan more before I plant. I am so plant- driven that I often buy something gorgeous and then wander up and down the garden trying to find somewhere to plant it!

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    1. I don't think I've ever been described as an analytical garden before Jane - thank you for the compliment. I am though more like you than you realise.

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  3. Like you, I've been trying to repeat the most successful plants and plant combinations in my garden to improve the overall impact of the landscape but I still don't have my plant addiction under control, so my garden continues to be very much a mish-mash. Your garden, in contrast, looks very pulled together and well-curated to my eyes, Angie! Everything looks incredibly healthy too.

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    1. If only there was a quick cure for plant addiction Kris! There are far worse addictions to have though :)

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  4. Everything is looking beautiful - I look for your weather all three days - Aberdeen.
    Your Candelaber primulas don't like to grow in my garden, because it is too dry.

    Sigrun

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    1. Thank you Sigrun. Actually I am in Edinburgh just a bit further south than Aberdeen but both on the East Coast and our climate is very similar.

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  5. Angie, I think May was successful for your garden, so many plants are well and growing. Love your photo from the back step, I liked the combination of plants.

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    1. May is often slow here Nadezda and it can take until well into June before the garden takes on a more summery feel.

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  6. Your efforts are paying off. The garden is truly lovely and packed with such satisfying plants. I'm smitten with your Anemone trulifolia...will have to look for it here.

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    1. Thanks Marian - the Anemone sure is pretty. I hope you are able to source it.

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  7. If you had an allotment you would have a refuge for plants moved out of the garden.
    I planted s corydalis last year - no sign of it this year.

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    1. I don't think you are alone in the Corydalis failure Sue. Many folks don't have them return a second year. I am grateful that most of the seem to like my conditions. An allotment would be handy though.

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  8. Hi Angie, everything is coming along fine, as I mentioned in my latest post Cotinus are late developers, in the case of my C.c."Grace" the leaves do however hang on later than many other shrubs. I notice that you have identified the problem with candelabra primulas, great in flower but then a "cabbage patch" they probably only work well when plenty of space is available or round a large pond. I totally agree with you that epimediums are the best choice, the other options being probably a little bit coarse. I find the only problem with the epimediums is to remember to remove the foliage of the evergreen cultivars so the flowers can be seen.

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  9. It all looks very lovely, it's amazing how things have grown this last month filling out nicely. I have one candelabra Primula in my garden, happy it has survived the slugs this year.
    Hope you have a wild June..
    Amanda xx

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  10. Looks very lovely Angie - I think that there is a nice repetition of colour there, even if not with the actual plants. Your fencing/hard stuff also sets your plantings off nicely. I particularly liked the little glimpse we had of your new trollius towards the end. A pale lemony colour? Looks very pretty.

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  11. I'm guilty of putting too much into one border and planting in ones instead of repeating plants. The trouble is I'm essentially a plant collector. Why have three of the same thing when you could have three different gems? I've been trying hard to work at it, a group or repetition of the same plants does create more impact.

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  12. Dear Angie, to me your beds look wonderful as they are right now! They are lush and full and the color combinations are just right!
    Like you I love the Anemone trulifolia and agree with you that in general it is a good idea to repeat planting one specific plant. It just ties a space together and it so soothing for the mind.
    I am anxious to see how you will tweak these beds within the next month.
    Warm regards and happy gardening,
    Christina

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  13. I also have a tendency to overstuff my beds and borders. So hard to get rid of plants, so easy to buy them!

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