Monday, 2 May 2016

End of Month View April 2016

End of March 2016
It's time to link in with Helen and other garden bloggers over at The Patient Gardener. What a rough couple of days we had this week but those heavy rain, sleet and snow showers have given the plants a good drink and everything is looking rather lush right now.  I deliberately avert my eyes from the gaping hole back right of this border.  I suggest you do the same. That Cotinus will leaf out eventually.  So just what has changed since last month?  Nothing major.  I got the whole bed mulched but before that I took the opportunity to juggle around with a couple of Hellebores, it's not quite so obvious from the picture but they appear more balanced now. The evergreen ferns have had their annual chop and  I have removed a couple of the lower branches from the Cotinus.  Something I immediately regretted - it looks rather odd now.  Still, what's done's done!                                            

  
Admittedly there are a few colour clashes going on here at the moment.  One particular combo I am very pleased with though is the Bergenia Overture and Heuchera Binoche.  The purple leafed Corydalis picks up these tones too.  I do however need to swap out the pale blue Pulmonaria and the orange flowering Epimedium.  I can't remember this causing me much concern last year.  My attention must have been elsewhere.  I will swap the E.Ellen Willmott with E.rubra growing down in the side garden.  The Bergenia is one of those plants that I didn't particularly like but I have to admit like many other plants I now grow, it has grown on me and am glad I added it to the garden.  The bees are grateful for it too.  The drumstick Primula, P. denticulata Cashmeriana add a bit of colour near the back.  I grow these plants at the rear of the borders mainly because I find it helps hide those huge leaves later in the year.  This in my opinion is the only fault of this otherwise useful plant.
      

At the opposite end there is a bit too much white.  I recently bought some red flowered Trillium, Trillium erectum to be precise to underplant beneath the Hydrangea paniculata - another slow starter here.  I thought the red tones of it's blooms would balance out with the Heuchera and Bergenia.  Alas, since getting the pots home and doing a bit of research on this particular Trillium I have discovered that they are rather smelly things.  Since the spot they were meant for is near the arch I am now in two minds as to whether or not to plant them there.  I can't detect any scent from the foliage at the moment so I am presuming that it's the flowers that whiff.  I will keep them in their pots meantime and find out just how smelly they actually are.  Hostas and Solomans Seal are just coming into growth and some height here will come by way of the Polemonium in a few weeks time.    
    

End of March 2016
Through the arch everything is filling out just nicely.  Again, the plants have really benefited from the rain.  The hybrid cowslips are delightful, their sunset shades are just something a bit different and are now bulking up quite nicely.  The do clash a bit too with the other Bergenia here so that will be moved to replace the pale blue Pulmonaria.  I mentioned last month that I was concerned by the absence of the Gillenia trifoliate I planted here last year.  It has still not shown face.  I removed the box ball and brought the Liriope from the front garden where quite frankly it was looking some what peely wally (a scot's term for pale). Already it seems to be liking it's new home and putting on some new growth.  The Epimediums I thought I had lost have began to put out some new growth.  Of the three pots of E. Alabaster I planted last year only one appeared to have survived.  I blamed my watering or lack thereof for their demise.  The gap there near the front of the border should now fill up pretty quickly.  Just coming into bloom on the trellising is Clematis macropetala. Although planted on the opposite side of the trellis it naturally scrambles through it to this side.  The wind funneling up the side path dictactes it's growth - who am I to argue?  

The Camellia in the back corner has as you may remember taken a fair beating from to the cats trying to get to the fresh buds of the Actinidia kolomikta growing against the trellis.  The growth was very floppy - I have never notice a Camellia grow in this manner before.  I can only presume the cats have caused the problem.  Finding a solution was praying on my mind, a lot.  I don't want to loose the Camellia.  The other night lying in bed I conjured up a solution.  I had an old piece of metal trellising that I could utilise to give the Camellia the support it obviously need.  What a job I had shuffling my backside in there.  Now that the cats have lots interest in the Actinidia I am hoping it will recover.  If not I will need to seriously consider removing the Actinidia.

Without the trellis on Saturday
With the trellis on Sunday
           
       
Camellia japonica Elegans on support
Lastly, I have discovered some seedlings in this area and am hoping one of you very knowledgeable people can help me identify them.  Friend of Foe?  Anyone recognise them or is it a bit too soon to tell?  Thanks for reading.

unknown seedlings 

25 comments:

  1. Maybe if you offset the white with some white on the other side it would less dominant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you are right there Sue.

      Delete
  2. Sempre un oasi di bellezza il tuo giardino! Chissà che fioriture in estate! Purtroppo per i semi non ti so aiutare...

    Un saluto e a risentirci :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Pontos - those seeds will keep me waiting a little longer.

      Delete
  3. Angie your borders are looking good, such a lot of texture in the foliage with dots of colour, sorry I don't know what the seedlings are, Frances

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Frances. I do try to think about foliage. I don't always get it right but when it works it works!

      Delete
  4. Your garden looks wonderful Angie. I am always impressed at how much thought you put into the placing of your plants. Also it makes me chuckle how much you move them about, if they are not placed quite to your liking. I bet your plants all duck when they see you coming.
    I' m not sure about the seedling, show us again when it is a bit bigger.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Moving plants - yes one of my worse gardening habits and I think they do tremble when I pass with the trowel in my hand. I will show these seedlings later - I thought it might be a bit too early to tell.

      Delete
  5. Your borders are looking wonderful, Angie. You have put me to shame. I have just started weeding today as the weather has been awful up to now. I see you have an anemone (blanda?) at the front of your seedling photo. My anemone seedlings are the same shape as yours but not so large. I don't even thing they get that big before the true leaves come, but it is a possibility as they do seed around a lot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I certainly hope they are Anemone blanda Annette - time will tell. You are perhaps wiser than I am Annette. I note there are lots of weed seedlings around the garden now so I've got to start all over again! I hope this week is more gardener friendly.

      Delete
  6. Maybe the owl will scare off the cats? It scares me..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rusty has one of those faces Jessica - although close up he looks as if he's been having botox injections!

      Delete
  7. Sleet and snow! I guess I shouldn't be that surprised as portions of the US are receiving the same treatment but, as I feel summer already edging its way in here, that kind of weather seems strange to me at the start of May. Your garden looks none the worse for the wear provided by the weather, though. I'd be very pleased with a border coming together so well. Your solution with the Camellia looks like it'll do the trick. I'm wishing you warmer, garden-friendly weather, Angie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dodgy spring weather everwhere it seems Kris. I hope the Camellia does sort itself out - 5 years and to be honest is not much bigger than when it was planted. Which coincidentally is the same time as the one to it's left has been in the ground.

      Delete
  8. I think it wasn't a mistake to crown-lift the Cotinus and once the leaves are out it'll be fine and give the plants underneath more room and light. Hope spring is there to stay now, Angie, it was a bit reluctant to arrive this year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Reluctant is an understatement Annette judging by many of the blogs I've been reading. Thanks for the vote of confidence in my pruning, it's much appreciated.

      Delete
  9. Garden looking lovely,few more weeks and we will be in full colour I think. snow on Friday was a bit of a shock, covering the whole garden. I haven't brought some of the tender plants in but the seemed to have faired OK. I have hundreds of Cosmos plants to prick out, unlike most gardeners I often leave the 'weeds' in to flower.
    Amanda xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You haven't taken your tender plants in Amanda - I haven't dared putting any out. If the weeds here weren't so invasive I probably would do the same! Nettles and Willowherb are not tolerated here.

      Delete
  10. My Gillenia trifoliata has only just started showing some growth now and we are probably a week or two ahead of you, so hold out. Given the weather I just experienced in Edinburgh, it's probably feeling it should keep it's head down!

    Seedlings: I can't tell most as too young, but the ones on the bottom left look similar to parsnip seedlings, so it might be from that family?

    The borders are coming along well Angie.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Its amazing the difference a few miles and several hundred feet of difference make in the garden. You have so much green! It's all looking lovely and lots of colour too. Is that corydalis in the seedling picture? I have corydalis malkensis which has thrown a lot of seedlings very like the ones in your photo. Have a great week.

    ReplyDelete
  12. You have the textures and forms of the plants combining so nicely, Angie! I'm doing my best on that part, but last night I bought a plant that may throw the balance off in one of my beds again :/ Oh well... Hope your trellis solution works with the camellia; I would think it will make such a nice accent point!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Sorry no idea about the seedlings, and I love your trellis. It's so cute. And, as usual your garden looks perfect -- everything clean and tidy and properly matched up.

    ReplyDelete
  14. We have Trillium flowering in a pot by the patio doors, I have not noticed any smell (picture on blog).
    Not wishing to cause concern, in my experience continus do not like being pruned when they are young, whereas you can pollard them in the spring when they are well established.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I can't say that I've noticed any smell from my Trillium. Your garden is looking so neat and tidy, I am getting there slowly. Your plants obviously don't mind being moved around, they all look very happy!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi Angie, I am trying to catch up with comments, better late than never! I guess you have had had all sorts of weather since writing this post, everything from lovely hot and snow! Hope it has turned for the better by now.
    I have a few Trillium erectum too, although most of my trilliums are Trillium cuneatum (also red) – I can’t say I have detected any scent from any of them.

    ReplyDelete

Your comments are appreciated. My blog is currently experiencing issues with some readers reporting problems when posting their comments. Please bear with me whilst I try to rectify the problem.
I have temporarily switched on word verification. I apologise for this, personally, I don't like it either, I am hoping this may help.