Sunday, 15 November 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day 2015

The winds may have decreased but the rain persists.  It was more of a squelch around the garden than a stroll to get some shots of just what is blooming for this month's Bloom Day Post.

We've been spoiled with far warmer temperatures than we would normally experience here lately but this last couple of days have seen us come back down to earth with a bang!  At the beginning of the week the thermometer was reading an all time November high of 16°C.  That's warmer than some of the days we had back in summer this year.

The November Garden can be rather lean on blooms yet had it not been for the aforementioned storm some of the roses would have been looking particularly good this month.  The blooms that were open are now rather worse for wear.

Rosa Teasing Georgia

Still holding on in there, Rudbeckia summerina Orange.

Rudbeckia summerina Orange

Laden with rain, almost listing from the weight, is the magnificent Salvia Amistad.

Salvia Amistad

Against the fence, the winter Jasmine is now blooming.

Jasminum nudiflorum
Far from perfect Alstroemeria blooms.

Alstroemeria Inca Ice
Some of you may remember I attempted to over winter last year's Fuchsia as dormant specimens in the dark and by all accounts this was a massive fail or was it?  I left the pots to their own devices and for pretty much most of the summer they did nothing - a few weeks ago one of the pots suddenly sprung to life and is now flowering.  Now there's a turn up for the books!

Unknown Fuchsia

  Another Fuchsia, a hardy variety this time, shows few signs of just how late in the year it is.

Fuchsia magellanica Alba

The obligatory Mahonia in bloom.

Mahonia x media Charity


The first Hellebore of the winter also in bloom.  These green blooms eventually fade to a pale lemon.

Helleborus x hybridus Yellow Lady

Lastly, some surprises, we all like surprises do we not?

The most elusive plant in my garden.  Clematis Elsa Spath.  Last seen autumn 2013 but has never bloomed since around 2011.  I was surprised to find a single bloom entwined amongst one of the Clematis montana.

Clematis Elsa Spath

Candelabra Primula and Cowslips - Primula veris
Primula japonica Millers Crimson and Primula veris Sunset Shades 

I wonder, are there any surprises in your garden this November?

36 comments:

  1. Lovely November garden, Angie. I've seen on TV storm and rains in Scotland with strong wind. Did it damage to your garden? It's pleasant that many plants are on bloom as fuchsia, rose, clematis... I only envy , my plants are prepared for snow now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Minimal amount of damage Nadezda but there is another storm on its way! I think we are to expect snow by the end of the week too. Stay warm!

      Delete
  2. What a cracker of a clematis! All the more beautiful for being so elusive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed Jessica - it will be interesting to see just when it makes another appearance.

      Delete
  3. Dear Angie, I always look forward to your Bloom Day posts and certainly didn't get disappointed this time! It is wonderful how many different plants you still have blooming, especially considering the climate that you are gardening in. Of course, I love the rose 'Teasing Georgia'. I also think that your Alstroemeria 'Inca Ice' is a particular pretty one and I love your first Helleborus bloom. I have a particular weakness for the green Helleborus flowers.
    Now, that your clematis decides to bloom at this time of the year is indeed a surprise to me. In my garden a white bearded Iris is flowering right now, which is out of schedule and I have one perfectly blue flower stalk on my ajuga, also out of line for this time of the year.
    Warm regards,
    Christina

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That Iris is early, even by your standards Christina. Am I right in thinking that they are usually in bloom when it's spring heret? I hope your week is a good one.

      Delete
  4. Hellebores blooms! Wonderful! I don't expect mine until January.
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This Hellebore is early Lea - I would not expect to see mine until well into January/February.

      Delete
  5. Indeed, November is a strange month for unseasonal blooms popping up to surprise us. I love your rudbeckia, did you grow them from seed? The clematis is a surprise and so is the Hellebore. In fact you have so many lovely things still in bloom. I hope you are not blown away. We had the tail end of Abigail last night.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Rudbeckia was bought as a large plant Chloris and it is listed as being hardy, time will tell. I hope the wind wasn't too bad down there with you - there is another storm on its way and we are to expect snow! Stay warm!

      Delete
  6. Some beautiful November blooms! Teasing Georgia looks lovely with that pink blush on the outer petals; others may not approve, but I love the natural colour variations on roses. It's wonderful to see how much you have blooming; your Salvia Amistad looks to be going strong. Is this one that you overwintered from last year or a new plant? I'm trying to start thinking in terms of "oversummering" as I read that it can be done here... ;-) I love your Hellebore - such a fresh green - AND your fuschias are super! I hope winter remains kind to your garden :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think the cold brings out some of the pink blush Amy - it did not notice it when it was warmer. This is one of the cuttings I over wintered - the parent plant died but I had many cuttings and have enjoyed some of them and given many away to friends too. There are more on the go for next year.
      I think you would be wise to read up on over summering plants - you might find that extremely valuable and save a few pennies at the same time.

      Delete
  7. How nice to find the Clematis bloom and to get flowers on your Fuchsia! I've give up on Fuchsias here. While I grew quite a number in my old garden, it's hotter, drier and sunnier here and they just can't handle the conditions. (Wait 2 years and I'll cave and try them again.) The only good surprise I got this Novemeber was the first flower on my succulent Stapelia (aka carrion flower because the bloom emits an odor of a decaying meat).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yuk! Kris, tell me is the odour as bad as it sounds? I'm sure you'll get round to trying Fuchsia again. Perhaps by then they'll have come up with a variety to cope with your conditions....you never know!

      Delete
  8. No surprises for me, Angie, as the gardening season is definitely over in my corner of the world. So it was a joy to see so many blooms in your November garden. Happy GBBD! P. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Pam, we've got spring to look forward to now. I hope your winter isn't too harsh.

      Delete
  9. How fortunate we are to live in climates where so much is still happening in our gardens! Your blooms are all gorgeous and your fuchsia experiment is especially wonderful! Sounds like we've had similar weather lately with heavy rains and strong winds. Yuk! I'm ready for spring already.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too Peter! It's somewhat confusing just now as despite the rain and winds it doesn't at all feel like November and the longer it keeps going like this the sooner spring will arrive.

      Delete
  10. There is still colour in the Fuschia, but the Nerines are really looking good at the mo. You have some lovely stuff still.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad to read you still have something looking good Gary - enjoy while you can!

      Delete
  11. A good show, Angie especially given the weather! Great to see your unknown fuchsia come back to life. I’m not a fuchsia fan at all, but for sentimental reasons bought 'Mrs W P Wood' earlier this year (nothing to do with the name). It’s delicate like your Alba. I planted it in a pot but neglected it during the dryer days of summer and it looked like I could lose it. It too has come to life again :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am not the Fuchsia fan in the house Shirley, in fact I'd gladly do without but my mum loves them and I grew/grow them for her really. Glad to read yours is making a comeback too.

      Delete
  12. There's a poetic beauty in rain drenched flowers, I should think, that rose is like a poem in itself. Love that white fuchsia, so delicate! You certainly can't complain of a lack of flowers, Angie. If you're really looking for a Liquidamber, try 'Slender Silhouette' which is suitable for small gardens. I've planted two in our drive to make sure the car will still be able to pass in a few years. ;) Happy November days to you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the garden in the rain Annette - if it wasn't such a cold wind I'd happily be out there doing a bit here and there.
      I've just looked up your recommendation Annette and WOW! I need to see if I can source locally and if not I will buy online. Watch this space.

      Delete
  13. We have one precocious hellebore that always flowers well before the others and that is on flower at the moment. Will you take some cuttings from your salvia Amistad as it doesn't always overwinter does it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Salvias are from last years plant Sue - it did not over winter here. Plenty of cuttings on the go right now for next year.

      Delete
  14. A very colourful post, especially given the weather recently. The dominate colour in our garden at the moment seems to be white!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Despite rain and storm you garden shows still beautiful flowers, I love that rose 'Teasing Georgia'. Beautiful early flower of the 'Yellow Lady' Hellebore. I sometimes have early Hellebores too, but I have not yet seen one bloom until now.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Angie, despite the weather you have some nice blooms, I like the white fushia and the clematis is beautiful, worth the wait, Frances

    ReplyDelete
  17. How fun that your Fuchsias are blooming now! It appears our weather is about to cross--we've been incredibly mild for months on end, and now we will plunge into winter with highs around 1C to 3C by the end of the week. Coming off an extended period with highs around 15C to 20C, this new trend will be tough (although "normal" for us at the end of November). Your garden, as always is incredibly lush and beautiful. That rose at the beginning is luscious.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hi Angie - it is me Annette from my Aberdeen Garden. I am trying to publish as Anonymous to see if this works.
    I was dismayed to hear that we are forecast snow by the end of the week, mind you it has been freezing these last few days and how wet. You have more flowering in your garden than me - I think my fuscias are still going, but I am not sure what else. Will have a good look tomorrow.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Angie, not really any surprises in our garden at the moment, plenty green though. I am keen to give the Rudbeckia summerina Orange which you show us a go, a change from the yellow, and it looks very robust in your garden.

    ReplyDelete
  20. It's ironic that November temperatures have topped summer days Angie. I've come across alstroemeria flowers on another GBBD post and am amazed that they are flower as late as this. For some reason I've always thought of them as delicate summer flowers. I might well be tempted to try them in the future :) I hope that the recent winds did not do any serious damage to your garden.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Angie it is amazing how resilient our gardens can be especially when lashed with wind and soggy rain...so many stunning blooms there still....I especially like Rudbeckia summerina Orange...

    ReplyDelete
  22. Amazing what can be found when we have a wee search around even in November :)

    ReplyDelete
  23. Sorry I am so late to visit and comment, I am trying to make my round but the days and weeks are flying! Great to see you have so many plants in flower, I hope you still have some after the storm this week! Good to see the fuchsia decided to make an entrance, if it is a cutting from one of those you got from me it is probably Fuchsia ‘Snowburner’ – a bit difficult for me to see from the photo as they normally are double and quite big, but they can be smaller and single when the weather is colder. Hope your garden will be OK this week :-)

    ReplyDelete

Your comments are appreciated. My blog is currently experiencing issues with some readers reporting problems when posting their comments. Please bear with me whilst I try to rectify the problem.
I have temporarily switched on word verification. I apologise for this, personally, I don't like it either, I am hoping this may help.