Monday, 2 November 2015

End of Month View October 2015

I made few inroads with the jobs I was planning to do since I my last end of month post but not quite completed all the jobs I had hoped to have done by the end of the month.  DIY
Looking west
End of September 2015
projects, both here and at my brother's house saw my weekends occupied.  It can be tough being the family 'DIY go to gal' at times. Like buses, DIY jobs tend to come all at once!

As you can see there is still a fair bit of colour out in the front garden.  The trees that line the river bank tell their own autumn tale.  I think without seeing these trees you'd be hard pushed to guess we are now in the last throes of the year.  Thankfully the lawn has needed no mowing since my last post.

Looking west
End of October 2015

I have removed and binned the annuals.  I had originally toyed with the idea of attempting to bring Begonia Burning Embers through winter but the fact that the plugs were quite cheap last spring means it is probably not worth the time and effort involved.  The two roses I needed to move have been cut back by half and moved into better positions.  It broke my heart to cut of all those buds and blooms from R. The Lark Ascending but needs must and all that.  R. Lady Emma Hamilton has many buds lower down on the bush which might yet open and  two out of the three Salvia Amistad needed removing in order to do this.  This corner now feels much more balanced and each rose didn't even flinch!  Salvia cuttings have been taken and are now rooting away nicely on the kitchen windowsill.   I went a tad over the score last year by successfully striking no less than 18 cuttings and had a job finding homes for those I didn't want.  I've been a bit more cautious this year and have taken 6.  I had no idea just how readily they root.  Not having a greenhouse, I toil for valuable windowsill space in winter, the other reason I did not bother with the Begonia cuttings. 


The view toward the street shows the gaps left by the removal of the annuals and Dahlias.  I lifted the Cosmos atrosanguineus Chocamocha plants shortly after taking these pictures.  I will go into more detail at the end of my post on my plans for these expensive plants.  At a tenner a pop I can't afford to throw money like that away each year.  Cotinus Grace, in the foreground, now in full autumn mode.  Along the fence line, I have added some tall species lilies.  Lilium leichtlinii, which I bought last spring and never did get round to getting them in the ground.  They did beautifully in their pot though.  I picked up a couple of packs of martagon Lilies, L. martagon Arabian Nights, the other week in the GC.  I would have bought more but these two packs were the last on shelf.  I think their colours should blend right in.  They look rather impressive don't you think?



This is how the garden looks as you walk in the gate.   You can see some of the plants are just not  giving up yet.  There is plenty still on offer for any pollinators that are still visiting the garden.  The plants I added last month,  the Erysimum cuttings and silver edged Lady's Mantle have settled in and are now putting on quite a bit of growth.  Rosa Lady of Shallot will also receive a prune back to prevent wind rock.  This edge takes a mean battering from the winds.  The impressive foliage is that off Erysimum Fragrant Star.  Variegated green with cream edging it has done a grand job whether in bloom or not.






I mentioned last month of my intent to mulch the roses this winter.  My friend swears by giving her roses a good dollop at this time of the year.  I got round to buying the manure but haven't quite got round to spreading it yet.  The roses I have moved have been done and the climbing R. Teasing Georgia by the arch is also done but the remainder have yet to have their share.   They will be done this week come hell or high water.


A couple of you asked me last month on how I intend to keep the Cosmos for winter.  I should have pointed out that this will be the first time I've attempted this, so very much at the experimental stage.  Unlike the annual Cosmos many of us grow,  Cosmos atrosanguineus Chocamocha is in fact a tuberous perennial that in order to keep them for next year will require them to be kept frost free during winter.  I have scoured the web for advice and the first stage is to lift the whole plant, cut back growing stems to a couple of inches and allow the tubers/roots to dry out for a few days in the shed.  The plants lifted very easily and I shook off as much excess soil/compost as I could. Once dried it will, I imagine, be easier to clean of the remaining soil.  To me they look like a mass of roots rather than tubers, or tubers than I am more familiar with that is.   Once dried out I will pot them on into a trough I have with some fresh, dry compost.  I will overwinter them in the cupboard under the stair.  The idea, I am assuming is to treat them pretty much like Begonia or Dahlia tubers.  We shall see.  I am also reading that they can take an age to come back into growth and that I must not be too hasty to discard them next year.  


Thanks for reading and please join me and other garden bloggers over at The Patient Gardener's blog for a nosy around other folks gardens.  Have a good week.

Rosa Port Sunlight


 

32 comments:

  1. Cotinus Grace is such a gorgeous colour. I'll be interested to see how you get on with overwintering the Chocamocha. Well worth the effort if it does come back. I love it, but it is a very expensive annual!

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    1. Grace seems much more pink than usual this year and I think it may because it gets far more sun here than it did in it's previous spot in the back garden Jessica.
      I am hoping those plants do come back, as you say too, an expensive annual.

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  2. Your garden is still looking so good in this time of year and you have still some lovely roses blooming too.
    I hope you have more success with the chocolate Cosmos than I had. Indeed, as far as I know you have to treat them like Dahlias in winter. The problem is all my Dahlias survive the winters, but the Cosmos never. I tried it three times without success, so I stopped buying this plant. I hope to hear your results next spring, may be I try it once more then. This Cosmos atrosanguineum Chocamocha is not very expenisive in our country, in contrast to the Martagon Lilies which are extremely expensive bulbs.

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    1. Thanks for the good luck wishes Janneke - after reading all the comments below, I fear I am going to need as many as I can get! Odd how they are far cheaper with you, you'd have thought they'd be on a similar par since theoretically we are really not so far apart.

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  3. Those roses are amazing and your garden is looking lovely. That is such a pretty Erysimum, a new one to me. I can never manage to overwinter Cosmos atrosasanguineum. The tubers never come back for me, maybe you will have more success. Cuttings don' t seem to survive either. A nice autumn manure feed is a good idea for your roses. I did that last year and they really appreciated it.

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    1. I hadn't read on how to take cuttings from the Cosmos Chloris, which is a shame when I consider just how much growth I binned, I would have attempted those too. We shall see come spring, watch this space.

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  4. I'll be very interested to see how you go with overwintering Chocolate Cosmos etc. I've grown it in pots in the past, and though I moved them to a dry frost free position and they failed to come up. But I'm guessing I should have removed them from the pots as you have done. I look forward to seeing how your experiment goes.

    The front garden looks quite settled in now, like you have found its groove. You should be pleased with your efforts this year. I can imagine your neighbours looking at your garden with envy as they pass by :)

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    1. I am now having severe doubts about the success of over wintering those Cosmos Julieanne after reading all the comments but I've nothing too loose by giving them a go now. Keep your fingers crossed.

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  5. It's hard to believe that it's near time to put your garden to bed, Angie. It looks great. I'm impressed by your success with the Salvia 'Amistad' cuttings - I should have tried taking cuttings before the plant upped and died on me during our last heatwave, or what I want to believe was our last heatwave.

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    1. There are many plants sound asleep already Kris, so nice to have some still looking good just now. Salvia cuttings would have been wise Kris. Now you know, perhaps you can try again.

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  6. Dear Angie, I have to start with your last photo of this post. That rose 'Port Sunlight' is just so breathtakingly beautiful it really made my heart skip a beat.
    As usual your garden looks very pretty and as you said yourself noone would assume that it is already the beginning of November, if the trees in the background wouldn't have changed into their lovely autumn coloration.
    I am surprised with which ease you are moving roses and other plants around in your garden. If I have to move a mature rose, it scares me to death and I am putting it off forever, since I am always afraid I will lose it. Just last week I had to move my beloved hybrid tea rose 'Sweetness' because the gardener had to dig underneath to fix a clogged drain. I planted it into a huge container, but I have really doubts that is will make it...
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. I suspect the roses move with relative ease here Christina is because it is far cooler and they are certainly not short of water. I watered really well daily until it rained hard last week and now they are holding their own, I hope.
      I wish your rose all the luck Christina.

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  7. Oh, I like 'Port Sunlight'! Something about that peach/coral color is very appealing, and the blooms have a pleasant shape. Also, I always enjoy those comparison photos (September vs. October). I need to remember to do more of that. It's not only entertaining, it's also educational--for the gardener and the blog readers. Excellent post!

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    1. I like this rose myself Beth - it's a very healthy rose. The only downsize is it's lack of scent. We can't have it all can we? These monthly posts help a great deal in planning where to go next too.

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  8. Your garden is looking fantastic, so much colour for this time of year. I hope you are successful overwintering your Cosmos, this is what has put me off buying it. Port Sunlight is a stunning colour, I do love the peachy shades, I think they're much nicer than pink!

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    1. I'm hoping for success Pauline but judging by comments on here I am going to be extremely lucky to do so. Most of the roses here are peach or peachy tones and I am really pleased I chose this colour scheme.

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  9. Your garden is still colourful! It looks fantastic. Outside it is not November, the asters are in bloom.

    Sigrun

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    1. Until yesterday it did not feel like November but the weather has deteriorated overnight and it now feels very seasonal here Sigrun. I hope your garden continues to delight you moving into winter.

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  10. Angie, you have been busyand done a lot. I want to move one of my species roses but have been waiting for the leaves to drop, perhaps I will stop waiting, your front garden is looking lovely in the autumn light, all the work has been worth it as the garden is looking so good, take a well earned rest in November, Frances

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    1. First of all Frances, let me say how nice it is to see you have managed to post on my blog again. Is this just a fluke I wonder. I certainly not.
      I know the best time is probably a bit later in the year to move the roses but I had to do it now as I won't have much time in the run up to Christmas. Good luck with moving your rose. I'm sure it will be fine to move now.

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  11. I love martagon Lilies as well Angie. And I enjoyed them all this summer, such amazing they were. Your garden is still very colorful, my roses are already covered for winter.
    Have a nice week!

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    1. I've never grown Martagon Lilies before Nadezda and really look forward to them next year. I'm hoping my roses will go on for a bit longer, it's not unusual to have some roses blooming at Christmas time.

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  12. It will interesting to see how the Cosmos do next year, as you say they are too expensive to discard. Looking at your garden you don't appear to have had the leaf fall that we have had here. R. Port Sunlight is looking good.

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    1. I will keep a record and do a post on the Cosmos Brian - hopefully it will be good news but the odds are against me I think.
      The trees round about are dropping their leaves fast now Brian, a drastic change this last too days makes it feel and look much more wintery now.

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  13. Ah, Port Sunlight is wonderful! I've been perusing DA's catalog and wracking my brain trying to figure out where to squeeze a few more roses! The 'climbers for shade' list is especially helpful, since that's about all I have left. Your garden looks great in the low light of fall.

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    1. Perusing that DA catalogue can be a rather expensive past time don't you think? Good luck in your search for your perfect rose.

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  14. Ciao Angie! Sembra sempre primavera nel tuo giardino! Le piante sono così belle e fresche! Complimenti! I gigli sono bellissimi! Faranno una grande figura nelle tue aiuole :)

    Un saluto :)

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    1. I certainly hope those Lilies don't disappoint Pontos. There is still plenty of greenery around to give everything that fresh look.

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  15. Such a beautiful end of October garden, Angie! Like you, I made inroads into the fall cleanup, but I still have much to do. I will be interested in the results of your cosmos overwintering. P. x

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    1. I am getting there too Pam. I've been getting stuck in this week and pleased with what I've achieved. Hoping for some reasonable weather this weekend so I can really break the back of the work that needs doing. Good luck in getting your work done too.

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  16. Still plenty colour there Angie, your garden is looking fab, hard to believe it's November! The nursery is carpeted in leafs, I am no tlooking forward to lifting them :( I've over wintered cosmos in pots in a heated greenhouse before but with variable success. Look forward to hearing how yours do :) Have a great weekend

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