Sunday, 18 October 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day October 2015

As the autumn/winter clear up begins, the garden is looking rather gappy right now.  I've began cutting down those plants that look rather ugly as they die back.  The emptying of our garden waste bins change from fortnightly to monthly lifts at the end of the month and I always try to make each lift count at this time of the year.

Firstly, apologies to Carol over at May Dream Gardens for joining rather late this month.  It's been a busy week at chez Angie!

Just coming into bloom for this month's bloom day post, is the Heptacodium miconioides.  A scented late flowering shrub.  Every year there is a race to see which comes first.  The pretty white flowers or the first frost.  It was a almost a photo finish this year.  The first blooms opened fully the day before our first frost.


Witch hazel, Hamamelis x intermedia Jelena continues to open yet more flowers too.  Little sign of autumn from the leaves though.


The hardy fuchsia, F. magellanica alba, still puts on a good display too.


The shady bed is a bit tired looking if you get up close and personal but from a distance it doesn't look too bad.  The blackened Kirengeshoma in the centre of this bed showing obvious signs of the frost.  Anemone Andrea Atkinson is still blooming though and the Mahonia at the back is just about to come into bloom. My first job when this border has died back, or more correctly, when I get in there with my secateurs, is to do something about that ugly old trellising on the fence.


Beneath the Hydrangea paniculata Pinky Winky, Anemone trullifolia has come into bloom again.


The pot of Agapanthus africanus Blue draws the eyes from the large gap left when I cut down the Helenium in the top border.  Perennial sunflowers, Persicaria and Geum are still working hard to provide sustenance for the pollinators.


 The view from below is equally floriferous!  These plants are teaming with pollinators.


If you can excuse baby Olli's laundry hanging on the line - this is the view looking to the top of the garden through the arch.


This late flowering Monkshood is another still going strong this month.  The stems from Persicaria Red Dragon mingles up through these plants.

Aconitum carmichaelii wilsonii Spatlese

Making my way down to the side garden, most of the Colchicums have succumb to last week's rain but this small clump of C. agrippinum is still upright.  I enjoyed a solitary bloom last year, this year there are three.  Last year's bedding Primula will flower again this year.  They've obviously enjoyed the cooler summer.

Colchicum agrippinum

Cyclamen around the garden are at various stages, this small clump of white flowering C. hederifolium is happy beneath the purple leafed maple.  I like the contrast between the purple leaf of the maple and the silver and white of the Cyclamen.

silver leafed Cyclamen hederifolium

I don't grow many Asters - they suffer dreadfully from powdery mildew here and I've gradually removed most of them from the garden.  However, the few I have left have done well this year.  The extremely slow growing Acer shirasawanum well into autumnal mode now.


Out to the front garden, there are still many blooms.  In the far corner, the Rudbeckia, Alstromeria and Rosa Graham Thomas bloom.  Ignore the variegated Sedum, it needs removing.  Cotinus Grace, another shrub that is now showing signs of autumn.


Other roses blooming right now in the front garden: R. The Lark Ascending, Teasing Georgia, Port Sunlight, The Lady of Shallot and Fighting Temeraire.


And as you can see, the roses are not the only plants still looking good in the front garden this October.  I really am pleased with just how many plants are still going strong.


 I hope you are enjoying your October blooms as much as I am enjoying mine.  Thanks for reading and have a good week!

36 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing. one of my resolutions was to extend the season in my garden this year and I feel I have achieved this to some extent, but it is no way as interesting as yours.

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    1. Such a nice thing to say L. My garden is evolving all the time and I am now aware of the importance of extending the seasons. We have a long winter here and it's often well into April before the garden gets going again so late colour helps reduce the feeling of emptyness.

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  2. Still plenty of colour in your garden Angie, I am trying to add more late colour to mine. No frost yet but I have noticed that the individual flowers of my Heptacodium don't seem to last very long so you tend to get a mixture of whites and browns. Your cyclamen with the true silver leaf is a little gem.

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    1. I have to say that my Heptacodium took a couple of years to settle and I found the same. I think once the plant matures and you have many more blooms you don't notice that they go over so quickly. Or at least that is my theory. The blooms are supposed to be followed by red calyxes but I have not witnessed that yet. I wonder if it is because mine's blooms later that most.

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  3. I've been debating with myself whether I want to cut down the stuff that's looking dreadful in my own garden. My witch hazel's leaves have completely turned orange already. I have some flowers still, but they are few and far between. I planted a couple of monkshood this spring, but I don't think they liked our hot dry summer. Glad you got your belated Bloom Day post together.

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    1. The monkshood does not like to dry out Alison - they love the conditions here in my garden. If you try again, give them plenty of water and you might just be lucky.

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  4. Ciao Angie! Il tuo ottobre sembra la mia estate!! Complimenti! L'immagine presa dall'arco è incredibile, è tutto praticamente perfetto e non cambierei nulla di quell'aiuola! Amo molto gli aconiti e il tuo è davvero bellissimo! L'Anemone trullifolia non la conoscevo! Sono estremamente geloso della tua fuchsia bianca perché quella varietà 'Alba' non riesco proprio a coltivarla!!!

    Un saluto e tanti complimenti :)

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    1. Yes, we are having a rather great late end to summer here Pontos. Many things are so slow this year that they are only just coming into their own now. I have forgiven mother nature for the rotten summer we've had.
      I take it that the heat/drought is the reason you can't grow the Fuchsia.

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  5. Your front garden is still so beautiful in autumn Angie, love the vivid colours. I really do miss my Asters this year, I had just grown wonderful drifts of them for autumn colours, but they are the bunnies favorite snack, so only a few left.
    I also admire your white Cyclamen, they are so pretty.
    Wish you some lovely autumn days this week.
    Regards, Janneke

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    1. Such a shame those dratted bunnies snack on your Asters Janneke. Rabbits are not an issue for me here, thankfully! I have to say I much prefer the white cyclamen to the more common pink ones. I do have pinks though but am always drawn to white ones.
      Hope your weather is great too.

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  6. From Annette @ My Aberdeen Garden:
    You still have a lot of flowers in bloom Angie and looking good. That is a lovely photo of your Sunflowers against a blue sky - it could be summer! I was surprised to read you had had a frost already. I don't think we have, though it was so cold the other morning that I immediately wrapped up some of my delicate plants and potted others to protect under shrubs.

    It seems my comment gremlins have not gone!

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    1. The frosts were quite light Annette. Enough to have to scrape the wind screen and thankfully they didn't do too much damage in the garden. Phew! I was just not ready for them, I took my eye off the weather forecast!

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  7. You do have plenty of blooms to enjoy in your garden Angie. Now I now what my delicate white fuchsia is called, thank you.

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    1. Glad I've helped with the ID for your Fuchsia Brian. It's nice to enjoy the blooms this late in the year isn't it?

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  8. Wow! Amazing how much is still blooming for you. I have to say, I think baby Olli's laundry makes a very charming domestic scene. Just the kind I like:-)

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    1. There is something so lovely about having baby clothes on the line Marian. Those little things hanging there bring a smile to my face :)

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  9. Dear Angie, what a lovely post about the many October bloomers in your garden! I think the most striking plant combination is the one between the white cyclamen with the silvery leaves and the burgundy leaves of the maple. I also love the Monkshood, a plant that I want to try to grow for ages in my own garden as a substitute for the delphiniums, but I never got around to sow it, yet. All your warm colored roses reflect the season in such a lovely way!
    Thanks for another fascinating and inspiring glimpse into your garden, Angie!
    Wishing you a great new week!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. If you are able to grow the Monkshood Christina you will not be disappointed with it. I'd have the Aconitum over Delphiniums any day! I've only just learned on Pontos's latest post that there is a climbing variety. Guess what I'll be adding to my garden next year.

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  10. You've still got a lot going on in your garden despite your chillier temperatures. I love that white-flowered fuchsia! Your roses look fabulous too. It's hard for me to fathom that you've already had your first frost when it still feels very much like summer here. Still, I'm clearing our plants that have bloomed out too, while also preparing for our main planting season (if the temperatures ever come down and stay down).

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    1. Thankfully the frosts were not to debilitating Kris, testament to that is the tender Agapanthus still blooming. I wasn't quite prepared and got myself in a bit of a tizz thinking that by the time I got up in the morning I'd be greeted by much more destruction.
      I am gearing up for planting season - done a good bit today and crossed more of those jobs from my to do list. Good luck in getting all your work done.

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  11. So bizarre to see Jelena and Heptacodium flowering in your garden. The latter has finished quite a while ago and now show its beautiful red stars whereas Jelena's foliage is turning orange and yellow. That fuchsia is very pretty. I took a cutting of a hardy fuchsia not far from here and look forward to see it growing. I saw Fuchsia magellanica in South America - I'm always so excited when I see garden plants in their true habitats. Have a lovely autumn and don't work too hard :) PS: Just tried, Angie, but it won't accept comments through my WP account, don't know why.

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    1. I am thinking it is an Annette thing Annette - the other Annette is having difficulty too :)
      I'll bet seeing the Fuchsia in it's natural habitat was a lovely sight. A trip to south America right now would warm my bones right up!
      The Heptacodium always waits until this late to bloom here Annette, it's a nice addition to the autumn garden.

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  12. You have so much still flowering, how lovely your garden must look with so much colour. Flowers at this time of year seem so precious, love your helianthus against the wonderful blue sky and your cyclamen is so pretty with its silver leaves.

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    1. Thank you Pauline. Any blooms at this time of year is indeed precious - I am often glad my garden takes so long to get going some years.

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  13. Lots of lovely flowers in your October garden Angie. It is the best October I can remember for colour, with so much still in bloom. My Heptacodium has finished now, what a delight it is. I love your gorgeous Aconite and fabulous roses.

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    1. October usually is a good month here for blooms Chloris. The garden takes so long to get going some years and the late colour is always welcome. Luckily we don't have the hotter climate those of you in the south usually have. Our plants just don't tire out so quickly.

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  14. Angie girl I am intrigued with how many plants we do share yet you are able to grow ones that I can't as perennials like the fuchsia (which looks like a little Xmas tree with white ornaments dangling down ... so pretty !)
    Acer S. is so gorgeous .. I am determined to get one in some where in the back garden !
    I just planted some hardy cyclamen a week or so ago so fingers crossed I will have those pretty flowers too.
    All in all what a gorgeous view with that wooden arbor (washing and all .. haha)
    This time of year is bittersweet ... cutting back and yet planning for next year at the same time .. we hardly ever are mindful of the present as gardeners eh ?
    Take care
    Joy : )

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    1. Thank you Joy. Look into the hardy Fuchsia, you might be surprised. There are some very hardy ones as far as I am aware.
      I hope the hardy cyclamen do well for you. You won't be disappointed with them I'm sure.
      I've done lots in the garden today as it was really nice and warm enough to forget just how late in the year it actually is. However, the race is on! Enjoy your week.

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  15. I love those Helianthus! Especially when they are framed by the view through the arbor. Plus lots of roses still blooming, wonderful selection. Happy belated GBBD!

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    1. Thanks Jason. Roses will bloom here right up to Christmas time if we are lucky. Those Helianthus are a blessing at this time of the year. The add so much height and last for ages.

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  16. You have a beautiful collection of plants. Still loads and loads of colour in your garden. The persicaria that you sent me has made four really healthy fast growing plants.

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  17. Beautiful Angie, so many lovely things to enjoy still. I particularly like that combination of the cyclamen and the acer leaves - and isn't 'Lemon Queen' amazing?! Though I really need to remember to offer mine some support...

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  18. What a beauty! Your sunflower (which one?) looks great! I have given the one in my garden to a friend. Sometimes I miss them.

    Sigrun

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  19. Your garden is beautiful Angie. The view of the blooms looking through the arch is so lovely and inviting. Happy Bloom Day and autumn to you!

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  20. Great positioning of the aster against the acer and the cyclamen with the purple leaved one too. They are wonderful trees to have in the garden. Frost already, yikes!

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  21. Still lots going there Angie, it's all looking lovely, I like all the wee plants tucked away such as the Cyclamens and Colchicums :) I arrived at the nursery this morning to find everything under a blanket of fallen leaves, brought down overnight in the wind.

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