Wednesday, 16 September 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day September 2015

It's September and for this month's Bloom Day Post all the usual suspects are blooming right now in my Edinburgh garden.  It's my opinion that September, like April, is a time of the year when we can really notice the distinct difference in growing conditions between the north and south here in the UK. I suspect as in previous years some of you will tell me that many of the same plants have long gone over in your garden.
Rosa Princess Alexandra of Kent

Sedums around the garden are only just coming into bloom.  Rosa Princess Alexandra of Kent is also blooming again, as is a scrambling blue hardy geranium.  The white Stachys has been in bloom for months now.  I want to divide this single specimen in spring and replace the rather disappointing white flowering Nepeta. I find it odd that both the blue and pink flowered varieties do well yet the white one has not done nearly as well.


Sedums: spectabile, Purple Emperor, Coca Cola, Autumn Charm
Chocolate, Red Globe and Gooseberry Fool

My pots of Agapanthus are still going strong.  They have truly excelled themselves in spite of the rotten summer.  The white flowering variety is almost as tall as I am at 5ft.  I am having trouble showing them off at their best because they are not completely erect and their spread is well in excess of 6ft.  We are struggling past them on the back step!  In the middle my rescue pot has well in excess of 30 blooms and A. africanus has thrown up some more stems.  All good in the Agapanthus department this year.  They'll soon be tucked away for winter.

A variety of Agapanthus growing in pots

The Japanese anemones are just getting into gear.  Many buds on most with only the first bloom to open on each plant.  Except A. Ruffled Swan, which has been blooming for a few weeks now.  I had my doubts as to it's identity since the first few blooms were singles but now are semi-double as I expect them to be.  Nepeta grandiflora Dusk to Dawn with the ever sprawling Potentilla nepalensis Miss Willmott are still blooming this September.  I never did get round to cutting back the Sanguisorba foliage - a shame because it really spoils this wee corner.
Anemone x hybrida: Ruffled Swan, Andrea Atkinson, September Charm and Pamina 
A few shrubs are flowering right now.  
Fuchsia magellanica Alba, Hydrangea paniculata Pinky Winky and Choisya ternata White Dazzler 

Cotinus coggygria Dusky Maiden is always chasing it's tail.  Cotinus are always last too leaf up in spring therefore wait until this late in the year to flower.  Blooms were laden with rain on Monday.

Cotinus coggygria Dusky Maiden
  
Who's been nibbling my Colchicum?  Those pesky slugs no doubt!  The first Colchicum blooms of the year.  This shot taken a couple of days ago, they have been brought to their knees

Colchicum

Cyclamen hederifolium are coming out too.  This pink flowered variety I suspect will eventually be crowed out by this deciduous lady fern.  Elsewhere little pops of white flowering varieties have been blooming for a couple of weeks now.  I am slowly introducing these wee stalwarts of the autumn garden in more appropriate spots.  It would be easy to lift these and pop them elsewhere but the Lady Fern does spread a bit and I worry that I inadvertently introduce it where I don't want it!  I've never had any luck in spreading the seeds.  But do wonder if perhaps I weed the seedlings out rather than them fail.  
Cyclamen hederifolium
The top border providing some late summer colour.  Helenium Moerheim Beauty is doing it's best. Taking a battering by winds and rains.  I removed the Lupins that previously grew here in front of it and did a good job of hiding the ugly bare stems.  I am thinking along the lines of encouraging another clump or two of the Persicaria.   I am in no hurry and that decision can wait until spring.  My priority for this border this autumn is to make space for the Buddleia globosa which is planted in a totally inappropriate spot.  But I am really struggling with which plats to sacrifice in order to make room.    
  
Left to Right:
Crocosmia Lucifer, Geum totally Tangerine, Ligulara Desdemona, Persicaria JS Caliente, Helianthus Lemon Queen
Cynara cardunculus and Helenium Moerheim Beauty

As autumn approaches, evidence of this is all around the garden now, the Asters are still tight in bud.  I note that the powdery mildew is yet to become an issue this year.  Meanwhile, at the top end of the shady bed, flowering for the first time this small clump of Aconitum I planted back in March.  It's been a long wait to enjoy these blooms.  The early flowering varieties are long gone and am pleased to have introduced these into the garden.  Aconitums are one of my favourites despite their notoriety.


The Heptacodium miconioides is another that is full of unopened flower buds.  It will be a race against time as to whether or not those buds open before the first frost, it usually is and can be a hit or a miss as to whether it will bloom or not.  I was quite surprised to see the first bloom of the witch hazel out this September.  It does leave me scratching my head though - those ribbons should be more orange than they are yellow.  My garden really is at sixes and sevens.  I have a Hellebore, a Pulsatilla, an spring flowering Clematis and the Pyracantha all deciding to bloom right now.


  
I fear I may have rambled on too much so a big thank you for reading and I hope the remainder of your week is a good one!  

37 comments:

  1. Angie, I see your weather surprised you with warmth, didn't it? Here we have warm enough weather +18-+20C and my roses are in bloom as well. I love yours Princess Alexandra of Kent, is it resistant to rain? Many flowers are in your so beautiful garden. Have a nice week!

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    1. Yes, it's been great to have some late warmth Nadeza and like you temps in the high teens. Princess Alexandra of Kent manages with the rain a bit better than some of the other roses but I find that the stems can be rather weak and not supportive enough of the weight of the blooms. Hence the canes for support.

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  2. Dear Angie, your garden looks so lovely right now! I find it amazing that even though your garden is relatively small you are able to entertain warm and cool color scheme plantings. Well done! Of course, I am in love with your 'Princess Alexandra of Kent', what a gorgeous rose. Your anemones are very lovely as well! I am surprised that the agapanthus are flowering that prolifically for you. They almost seem to do better in your garden then they do here in California. I am usually not a big fan of sedums, but I have to say I really like your green flowering varieties. All in all you have a very successful autumn garden and I hope you enjoy it to the max!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. The Agapanthus have taken me truly by surprise this year Christina. I followed some advice I was given by a couple of bloggers re feeding and it seems to have done the trick. The white one is truly a sight to behold. I had no idea they grew so tall.
      Princess Alexandra of Kent has a lovely perfume too. You are right it is a gorgeous rose which has sent up this massive central stem which I suspect is probably due to my pruning regime or my lack of knowledge in the pruning department. I am learning though.
      I never used to be a fan of Sedums either but now appreciate their late flowers just for the bees.

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    2. I am also amazing by those wonderful agapanthuses, Angie. For some reason I got it into my head that they couldn't possibly be grown in Scotland, and so on a recent trip to South France where they had enormous agapanthuses bursting out of every roundabout and municiple park flower bed, I was raging with envy. Now I am envious again at seeing yours, but with new found hope that perhaps I could give them a go next year... hurray! So please divulge your agapanthus feeding regimen, I think I'm going to need it! And is growing them in a pot the recommended method?

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    3. Joanna - Yes, give them a go but do have patience. I keep all mine in pots and are over wintered in a cold greenhouse. The advice I was given was to beginning feeding, tomato food, when the new foliage is around 6 inches high. They were kept in the greenhouse until the end of May. I fed them every two weeks with watering in between if I noticed the foliage got a bit droopy. I stopped feeding around 4 weeks ago and will stop watering them about now since it is getting cold. The flowers are beginning to go over now and I will cut those back at some point during the week.
      The white one, I picked up at Homebase as bareroot plants back in spring 2011 for a couple of pound. They were not as labelled though, so I have no idea which variety they are. They now fill a large pot around 12"x12" and this year has been their best yet.

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  3. Hi Angie, interestingly we are about the same as you, even though we are a lot further south. I have got A. 'Pamina' too, but it has yet to begin to bloom. Our sedums are just coming out - and, like you, many of the roses are convinced that it is June. Thanks for a lovely ramble around your garden - some interesting plants to view!

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    1. I am surprised to read our gardens are at a similar stage Jane. Reflective possibly of the rotten summer most of us have experienced this year.

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  4. You have a beautiful garden!

    Thanks for sharing this post and giving me the idea to also participate!

    I just started a new blog last week about gardening and crafting. You are always welcome visit if you want.

    Greetings, Sofie
    http://sofies-succulent-beads.blogspot.be/2015/09/garden-bloggers-bloom-day-september-2015.html

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    1. Thank you and welcome Sofie - I will pop over to view your blog :)

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  5. Wow, autumn in your garden is spectacular! That rose is stunning, and so are the sedums!

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    1. Thank you Beth - such a nice thing to say :)

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  6. Your garden contains blooms that cover a range of seasons in southern California. Our Sedums and Japanese Anemones bloom on a similar schedule (or would if my Anemones had received enough water to bloom at all this year) but my Agapanthus have been done for months now and my Cyclamen have yet to make an appearance. Your summer weather may have been difficult, Angie, but it produces beautiful flowers!

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    1. My summer is relatively easy in comparison to what you experience Kris, you are often in my thoughts when I have a wee moan about the weather and I soon count my blessings!

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  7. It's strange that you have your Colichums flowering now, mine are only just poking their noses above the soil, it will be a while until they are flowering, but I have already cut back Crocosmia Lucifer and all my Agapanthus.! You have lots of lovely flowers in your garden at the moment, it is all looking really pretty.

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    1. Pauline I don't know enough about the Colchicums but wonder if colder temperatures triggers their flowering. Mines generally do bloom in September so can't say they are out of sinc this year. My new one C. Waterlily doesn't seem to have appeared though. I must investigate tomorrow.
      I suspect I will be cutting my Agapanthus back within the next few days - it's bitterly cold during the night now and I suspect that will do them in!

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  8. Your hot border is positively burning, Angie, wow! It's odd but lovely to see Agapanthus in bloom. Mine are indeed long finished. Colchicums and Cyclamen have started to flower. I reckon anything that requires warmth is flowering later in your are but the rest sticks to rules. Who cares when as long as they do? Have a lovely Indian summer :) PS: Still impossible to comment with WP

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    1. I think your reckoning is correct, mine you I feel like that myself sometimes :) And I agree, it doesn't matter when just so long as they do. Thank you for making the effort despite WP being an issue at the moment.

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  9. Good to see your garden is still producing prodigious amounts of flowers Angie, I have to wonder how you find room for all the plants you mention...............Four different anemone hybrids! I have had mildew here from very early on, it almost adds to the attraction of Berberis thunbergii atropurpureum but the verbascums and hesperis both look shocking.

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    1. I do squeeze in way too many plant Rick - it's a bad habit I have. I suspect that in a few years time many things will run out of space and therefore the will to live!
      I wonder how your Heptacodium is doing - I've lots of catching up with blogs to do and intend to get on top of reading them this weekend. I have a stonker of a head cold and don't intend to do little else.

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  10. I think we are about level pegging despite the north south divide. In fact you are ahead of me with sedums, but I gave mine a Chelsea Chop because they've been so floppy in the past so that will have set them back. And I also have a witch hazel ('Diane') trying to bloom! It's annoying because it's a new one with very few flower buds anyway. It will hit the January display hard I have no doubt.

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    1. The Chelsea Chop - I wouldn't dare here Jessica. It's bad enough waiting for some plants to bloom without giving them any other hindrance :)
      I hope your witch hazel surprises you and puts out a good display in January. My Jelena one bloomed from October until May last year, so you never know. I'll send down some good vibes.

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  11. Great blog Angie and still lots of colour in the garden and to come. it's interesting what you say about the white Nepeta. I've found it to be much weaker than the blues and pinks too. A great selection of Sedums which are great for early autumn colour and isn't it nice to see some sun and warmth in the last week or so, better late than never! have a great weekend.

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    1. I wonder if the white Nepeta needs a lot more heat/sun than we can offer it Rona. Anyway, they've all been relegated to the compost bin now, more to the disappointment of one of my cats. He was following me up the path to get a last munch! I hope you have a busy weekend at the nursery.

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    2. I think it is too cold for them up here, poor cat lol. I had catmint cuttings in the greenhouse earlier in the summer that were completely trashed by next doors cat! I find an upturned metal hanging basket over cat mint crowns protects the plant and puddy cat can still get a fix from the bits that grow through :) it's getting quieter at the nursery, that time of year, though the sunny days bring them out :) have a good week.

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  12. Try growing some of your cyclamen seeds in a tray or a pot, they germinate really easily and that way you can let them grow a little bit bigger before planting them out.

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    1. Thanks for that Sue - I will do just that. Watch this space!

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  13. What a beautiful bit of late summer, Angie! I love your Heleniums and Anemones... and Cyclamen, which is one of my favourite tiny plants! Your success with the Agapanthus is encouraging; I hope to try some next year; and while reading about them, I found that quite a few people have trouble getting them to bloom at all! Any helpful information would be appreciated ;-)

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    1. I have read many times Amy that people often think that they need to be pot bound to bloom well but that is a myth apparently. Those that can grow them in the ground would not experience their plants becoming pot bound would they?
      I fed mine fortnightly with tomato feed, which foliage was around 6 inches high, watering in between when the foliage looked as if it was beginning to droop. They were kept in a cold greenhouse over winter right up until the end of May and then given a sunny spot outdoors where they will remain for a couple of more weeks unless we get an early frost then they will be in there like a shot!

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    2. A big thank you for the detailed reply, Angie! I'm looking forward to trying... :)

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  14. Ciao Angie!! È sempre uno spettacolo il tuo giardino! Incredibile quanto è bello quell'angolo con le persicarie e le ligularie così ben fiorite!! Sono d'accordo sugli aconiti, sono veramente bellissimi! La Fuchsia 'Alba' non riesco a farla crescere, la tua invece è perfetta :)

    Un saluto :)

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  15. You have a wonderful range of autumn colour in the garden Angie, I am really impressed with the Agapanthus, I will take note of your comment above and must feed mine more often next year. It is interesting comparing flowering times across the country, our Asters are not flowering yet. Helen in Malvern had a plant flowering a month ago, whereas ours, 5 miles away, is still in bud!

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  16. So many lovely blooms! Your garden really is a blaze of color this autumn. The corner with the Helianthus is so eye-catching; I don't know how you will decide what to remove to find room for the butterfly bush, but that's a good problem to have. Happy Bloom Day!

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  17. Angie, witch hazel with a bloom in September, that is unusual. There is a distinct difference in the late September garden here in Cheshire compared to that of our Aberdeen garden. The garden here still has a full of life look, back in Aberdeen it was shutting down at this time, but that's not to say it lacked charm. To be quite honest, there is a possibility that we may return to our roots, mind you if thats the case we had better get a move on, the milder weather here would be the only thing to hold us back.

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  18. Lovely to see your agapanthus thriving, I got my first two plants last year and got two flower stalks on each this year. Would love to have many more, especially a white one and a much darker blue, I will feed them like you have next year and see if I can get more flowers, didn’t think of giving them tomato feed, only gave them slow-release feed like all the other plants.
    You might be still having things in flower that are gone over in my garden, but you are always earlier with flowering cyclamens than me! I don’t know if it is the lower temperatures or what, but all mine are still in buds, possibly several weeks from flowering.
    By the way, did the dark red rose I gave you survive last winter? I haven’t seen it on any of your posts this year.

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  19. Plants do sometimes exhibit a mind of their own, and decide to strike out in some way not consistent with the garden books. This can provide some of the surprises that keep the garden interesting. Love the 'Totally Tangerine Geum, plus all your Agapanthus. A very interesting selection of Sedums, as well.

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  20. Hey, you and I've the same heights -- 5 feet 1 inche :-D. Ah! you are truly my fellow gardener.
    Yep, most of those blooms are now gone from my garden and got replaced with asters, mums, sedum, pale-leaf sunflower, sun-choke flowers.
    You truly indeed have a vast collection of sedum :-D.
    As usual beautiful flowers and pictures. I will be allowed to visit your garden whenever I visit Scotland, right ? :-)

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