Monday, 31 August 2015

End of Month View August 2015


End of July 2015
A couple of readers have contacted me to say they are having difficulty posting to my blog and I am unable to find out where or what has gone wrong.  If you happen to be experiencing such problems would it be too much to ask you to let me know.  You can contact me via my facebook page, the link is there on the right, alternatively you can drop me a note via the contact me button.  I don't know if it's a blogger issue or an issue with settings.  She scratches her head.  I am quite the technophobe and after trawling various help forums I am still no further forward in fixing the issue. I've tried accessing my blog via alternative devices and it seems to be working fine.

Autumn looms as I put together this month's End of Month View post.  The front garden has filled out well.  It's been exactly 1 year since I put some serioius thought and effort into this garden.  There has been success and failure.  More success than failure I am pleased to say.  What started out as an orange/red/purple colour scheme has gradually morphed into orange/red/yellow scheme.  The purples, which I have had most difficulty with have proved to be the trickiest to get just right.  Salvia Amistad may be a beautiful plant but more at home in the pink/white/blue border round the back than out here I have concluded.

Looking west you can see that there are still plenty of blooms in the front garden.  Some of the roses are taking a bit of a break but most of them will bloom again.  Many of them have new buds.  I want to at some point over the next month do a stand alone post about the roses and my experience as a newbie rose grower.  

 Looking west - End of August 2015


Clearly missing this month is the Anthemis tinctoria growing to the left of the arch.  Other plants I've removed this past month has been Kniphofia Bee's Lemon, Geum Totally Tangering, the Itoh hybrid Peony and the large clump of lemon coloured bearded Iris.  All have transplanted well, either into pots or alternative spots elsewhere round the back.  A clear benefit of the cool weather.  

Phormium Evening Glow
The gaps that were created by their removal were a magnet to the cats that decided to use the bare soil as their toilet.  I've used some pots for the time being to deter them.  The Phormium, P. Evening Glow in the far corner fills the spot until I can get round to moving R. Lady Emma Hamilton into this spot.  She is growing to the rear but would benefit from being brought forward.  The pots of trailing begonia to the left of the arch.  I ruled out using R. Summer Song in this spot.  The tones of this rose I found were too pink to my eye.  I am now thinking more along the lines of R. Hot Chocolate.

The view towards the house, punctuated by the 3 clumps of Leucanthemum Broadway Lights. They are off to my brother's garden just as soon as I find time to cut them back and lift them.  Yellow blooms in the foreground are Achillea Inca Gold and Crocosmia George Davidson.  In the background Rudbeckia goldstrum in the far corner.  I read somewhere recently that yellow can be the hardest colour to get right in the garden.  This is one statement that I wholeheartedly agree with.  Providing I stick to deep yellows or golds I should have no difficulty.

Towards the house - End of August 2015


Standing in front of the house, the view from here is my favourite spot to stand and admire the front garden.  A bench in front of the window would be nice but whether or not it would get used is doubtful.  You can see just how tall both R. Lady of Shallot and The Lark Ascending have got.  The Lark Ascending needs moving back a little, there is plenty of space to do this and at the same time a side ways move of around 18 inches to balance the space once Lady Emma Hamilton is moved forward.  More Salvia Amistad to the right.  I already have some Crocosmia Hellfire to replace it and sandwich between the two roses.

Towards the gate - End of August 2015

I don't have an extensive list on what needs doing this autumn, just a tweak here and there should do it.  Nothing terribly labourious.  Right now I should really be focusing on spring bulbs but can't quite decide which, if any, I want to add here. You may remember my disappointment with a couple of my selections earlier in the year.  Perhaps I am just being a bit too cautious because of this.  I may just allow the crocus that are already there multiply naturally.  In winter the front garden is very bare. I commented back in spring that ideally I'd like some Hellebores for winter colour.  My main dilemma is just where to put them!  I could possibly get away with a few dotted along the the gap between the hedge and the roses but wonder if they might hamper maintaining the hedge.  This needs more thought.    

I'd like to focus on a few individual plants if I may.

Digitalis parviflora Milk Chocolate.  Three reasonable sized pots planted last autumn have failed to bloom this year. Disappointing really as I had high hopes for them. They are only now clumping up, you can make out the foliage just to the left of the Euphorbia in the shot above.  Here's hoping they's finally got their roots down and can concentrate on blooming well next year.

Rosa Jude the Obscure has finally produced a bloom that doesn't appear to have balled.  Hip Hip Hooray! I might get a sniff of the supposed wonderful fragrance this rose produces yet.  I am giving this bud a wide berth for now in fear I put a jinx on it.   There are in total another 10 buds, surely the odds are for rather than against at least one of them opening completely.

Rosa Jude the Obscure
          



Alstroemeria psittacina
Alstroemeria psittacina, I bought this last year yet it failed to bloom despite the perfect summer we had.  It was planted deep to give it as much of a chance to survive winter as possible.  Sadly, the blooms have turned out more pink than the red I had hoped.  It is not coping particularly well with the wind here either.  I am not going to be too hasty to judge this plant.  I will leave it for another year and see if my feelings change about it.





The Potentilla I purchased and mentioned in my previous post, P. Monarch's Velvet is settling in and has began putting on new growth.  The colour of the blooms is far more red than my camera has captured.  I look foward to thses filling out for next year.

Potentilla Monarch's Velvet

You may remember that in spring I treated the border adjacent to the hedge to a good mulch of manure. Intending to beef up the hedge, which it has, it has also benefited the Tropaeolum speciosum. I have never seen it quite to vigourous before.  Seen here taking hold over one of the Salvia plants.  I am not complaining about this, not one single bit.  I have promised one reader some tubers from this plant, you know who you are, I've not forgotten about you.  They will be lifted just as soon as they start dying back.  This apparently is the best time to do it.

Tropaeolum speciosum and Salvia Amistad

Crocosmia Jackanapes, a new plant here.  Already in the ground sandwiched between two of the roses, it looks a bit cramped just now but once the roses are spaced better there will be more room for it.

Crocosmia Jackanapes

That pretty much rounds up my post this month.  I leave you now to catch up with all the posts I've missed this last week or so.  Thank you for reading and if you are interested in taking part in the End of Month meme, please pop over to The Patient Gardener's Weblog.  Everyone is welcome!

29 comments:

  1. Quella Crocosmia è bellissima così come tutto il giardino! La potentilla ce l'ho uguale ma quest'anno ha sofferto un po' il caldo! Bellissima anche la Salvia 'Amisad`, una delle mie preferite insieme alla Blue Enigma :)

    Un saluto e una buona settimana :)

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    1. There is no danger of plants failing due to the heat here Pontos....EVER! Have a good one yourself :)

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  2. You've done well to get any end of month photos - I fear my camera would fill with water if I tried to take pics here today! The view towards the gate is lovely. And isn't that Potentilla gorgeous?

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    1. I've noticed the rain is bad in places Sarah - hoping you get some respite soon. I do like the Potentilla and he colour really is like velvet. It's not often the breeders get the name quite so right.

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  3. Hi, Angie!
    I see you have many plans to move the plants, I did yesterday- moved a Potentilla bush to the fence to have a spot for hyacinths. Lovely rose Jude the Obscure! I also liked your crocosmia only the problem is storing their bulbs in winter time.

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    1. Thankfully we don't have the issue of having to store bulbs over winter here Nadezda. I'll be concentrating on moving plants this weekend, fingers crossed it's gardening weather.

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  4. Hi Angie,

    Don't worry too much about the comments issue, it isn't something you can sort and is usually down to the different companys making it difficult for other users to comment and login. Thats why i always have to comment on blogspot blogs on my old account and not wordpress - it just doesn't work most of the time so this way is easier.

    Good luck moving your plans. If you like I'd associate it if you could do the same here for me :)

    Your front garden really is looking good, I'm jealous and wish i could sort mine out too but it never seems to quute get there.

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    1. Apologies for the typos. Predictive text is not often my friend.

      It was meant to say i'd appreciate it if you'd move my plants here for me. Kinda lost its cheekiness.

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    2. I got the gist Liz :) Darn that predictive text! Thanks for the input re the issue. From what I can gather it's all about cookies and there is nothing I can do about it. Google are supposed to be looking into it but I won't hold my breath!

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  5. Cooler weather is filling my head with plans for moving things around too...not quite as comprehensive as yours though. Things have shaped up nicely for your end of August report.

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    1. I'm always moving plants around Ricki - just another of my bad habits. And I often wonder why plants take so long to settle in! Good luck getting yours done.

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  6. Are you having to support your Lark Ascending or does it stay up on its own? I've had the same problem with Jude, but am getting new buds on quite a few of the roses now. September should be a better month for them.

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    1. The Lark Ascending is needing no support Jessica. I think both this rose and The Lady of Shallot have benefited from all the manure I added in that part of the garden. Their stems are really strong and both roses are incredibly healthy.
      I think all most of mine will be blooming again in September too.

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  7. Your garden looks splendid again this month, Angie. I hope that 'Jude the Obscure' rose realizes its potential as it certainly takes a nice photo. I've never seen a Crocosmia like that 'Jackanapes' - it's wonderful.

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    1. Thanks Kris. There are many cultivars of Bi Coloured Crocosmia on the market here. They are a fairly common sight in the GCs at this time of the year.

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  8. It all looks fabulous, Angie--especially 'Jude the Obscure.' I don't seem to have any issues with comments here, but maybe that's because I use Google Blogger, too. Good luck!

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    1. Thanks Beth. Apparently its a cookie problem, hopefully Google will get their finger out and fix this issue.

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  9. Looking west and towards your gate are beautiful, there is still so many plants flowering in your garden. Your rose 'Jude d'Obscure' is a beauty, I even should like to have it for the name, how silly I can be.

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    1. Not silly at all Jude - we all have reasons for choosing some plants and a name is as good as any in my book. From what I can gather it is a rose that is susceptible to balling so maybe do a bit of research for how it performs with you in the Netherlands.

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  10. Dear Angie, your front yard looks great, again. It is hard to believe that you are only working a year on this garden. Everything has grown in and filled out so nicely.
    Gosh, you are really a plant shifter ;-)! But maybe that is exactly what it takes to make a garden work. I just know that I need much longer to make a decision to transplant a plant.
    I have to admit that usually I am not keen on bold red or yellow colors in the garden, but that Crocosmia Jackanapes looks fantastic. What an eye catcher!
    Wishing you lovely last days of summer with lots of sunshine!
    Christina

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    1. Thanks Christina. I am a bit of an over enthusiastic plant shifter, you are right! Whilst you ponder over such a decision for some time I am a tad too hasty and often find I never really give some plants a chance.
      The weekend is looming, wishing you a good one :)

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  11. Autumn may loom alright but your borders still look crisp and bright, Angie, I'm so impressed. Your emerald lawn sets the flowers off beautifully. PS: Impossible to comment with my wordpress account but I suppose you know who I am ;)

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    1. Thanks Annette. We do green here well in Scotland that's for sure! I hope google get the issue sorted sooner rather than later. As far as I can make out the issue is with the prove I'm not a robot thingy and third party cookies, what ever they may be!

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  12. I always enjoy seeing your beautiful garden which is looking great and am smitten with Crocosmia Jackanapes!

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    1. Thanks Peter, what a flattering thing to say :) Jackanapes is a nice Crocosmia. My new Hellfire is supposed to be quite impressive too.

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  13. Looking great Angie and really filling out too, that's an interesting colour of rose and Crocosmia, the days have suddenly turned much cooler, definitely feels like autumn this week :/

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  14. I thought of you last week Angie when I was walking along the prom at Grange-over-Sands in Cumbria. There are some lovely stretches of perennial planting running alongside it including a orange/red/yellow bed. Fingers crossed for 'Jude' - it's most exciting waiting for something to flower for the very first time. I have had some comments from Wordpress users who have found it hard to leave a comment on my blog but I think that is down to a long standing problem between Wordpress and Blogger :( I do sometimes have problems though commenting on Blogger blogs using my Google account. Quite often the comment will disappear when I hit publish. I've got into the habit of copying my comments and having a second go which usually works.

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  15. Crocosmia Jackanapes is a bright spark, I like that. I should fill into the space more comfortably as it grows next year. I know what you mean about yellow, and I think the rudbeckia looks good in the front garden.

    Maybe if you put a small bench at that position in the front on the house, you might find you will use it? You could try something temporary like a plank and a few bricks just to see if it might work. For your helebores and spring bulbs, put them in pots and then place them in the spaces where the other foliage has died down, then remove them once they go over and as the other plants start to sprout.

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    1. that should be "It should fill into the space..." :)

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