Thursday, 7 May 2015

Tree Following May 2015 - Sorbus Autumn Spire

At last!  It's been a long time coming!  It seems somewhat of a relief that I finally have something to report for this month's Tree Following post.  I feel as if I've prattled on about everything except my wee tree in my previous posts.  I wasn't sure I could string it out much longer!

This month sees the first anniversary of me planting Sorbus Autumn Spire in my garden.  S. Autumn Spire's growth is described as fastigiate (columnar) and was bought specifically for this part of the border where it narrows.  It's a rather nice looking tree, even though I say so myself.  I feel as if I made a good choice in so far as this tree is concerned.  The birds continue to feed from the little feeder I have hanging there.  The trellising last year was a very useful perch for the blue tit and sparrow fledglings.  It's nice to finally start thinking forward into summer rather hovering around in Spring.   
Sorbus Autumn Spire
Healthy new foliage.



Markings/texture on it's bark.  The bark of young Rowan trees are generally described as grey but to me it looks more olive green than grey. 




More importantly, flower buds.  It flowered rather sparsely last year and produced very few berries (pomes), there should be far more this year. 

For those of you that are familiar with Rowan trees, S. Autumn Spire is a sport of the widely planted S. Joseph Rock.  According to the RHS, they can fall fowl of aphids, blister mites and sawfly.  So far everything seems rather healthy.  The new foliage has a very healthy sheen to it.

The young Viburnum (V. sargentii Onondaga) growing to the left, is also budding up and should be in bloom about the same time.  The bronzy tinge on the foliage picks up the colour of the flower buds on the rowan.  It's still young and has grown very little in the couple of years I've had it.  This shrub has gorgeous spring colour, as you can see.



This shot, taken looking towards the house, is from an angle I haven't shown you before.   Although many of the plants in and around here are not all woodland plants, the area as a whole seems to be developing a kind of woodland feel to it  - or at least my interpretation of one.  Do two trees constitute a woodland?  I doubt it!   As the trees matures and the shrubs fill out, many of the perennials will have to go but right now there is plenty of room for everything.  I recently brought the tiny Acer palmatum Garnet from a spot that had been inappropriate for it.  Use it or loose it, as they say.  I hope it will be happy enough here.  
    
Laburnum and Sorbus in my mini woodland
Time now to pop over to Loose and Leafy so see how everyone else's tree is fairing this May.  See you there!

39 comments:

  1. I love the photos of the leaves and buds!

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    1. Thank you Lea - very healthy looking aren't they?

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  2. Your Sorbus Autumn Spire is doing very well, I like this tree. Our neighbours have a collection of Sorbus trees which I can see from my veranda, so pretty. The Viburnum sargentii has a wonderful springcolour, a nice shrub for your garden. In your imagination two trees can constitute a woodland, why not.
    Wish you Happy Gardening!

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    1. It is a nice tree Janneke, ticks all the boxes as they say. As for the woodland, as you say why not!

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  3. How exciting to have the leaves and buds at last! The colours are beautiful, and I love the hues of the Viburnum. I'm not sure but what woodland is in the choice and placement of the plants...? I can easily see your having a "patch" of woodland with just two trees and assorted woodland plants... why not ;-)

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    1. Thanks Amy. Yes, I think I can create a woodland in the area with the right choice of plants. I spread the snowdrops in and around here back in spring and I can continue to add plants in future years to create a special little place. Watch this space!

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  4. Oh, I do like the new foliage on your Rowan tree! And of course the Viburnum, which is always a favorite for me. Your mini-woodland looks like a welcoming place to spend a few hours. :)

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    1. A few hours weeding perhaps Beth :) Yes, I look forward to developing it more in the coming year.

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  5. Wow! The tree is making up for lost time. It's very attractive, Angie.

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    1. It surely is Kris, about time too!

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  6. Miniwoodland - how nice!;)) Do you know, that the sorbus is growing? *smile*. In autmn we will cut down the first one of two, 13 years old, to big for our small garden - but allways beloved very much.

    Sigrun

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    1. Here in Scotland it is considered unlucky to cut down a rowan tree Sigrun. Perhaps you should plant some white heather to ward off the bad luck :)

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  7. Does the tree seed everywhere as that is what puts me off having a rowan

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    1. Only been in the garden 1 year so can't really comment re seedlings. But I hadn't thought Rowans were renowned for this. I must read up myself. This really is a lovely tree Sue - google it and you'll see what I mean.

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  8. I liked to grow rowan but it was very high and was pruned. Is your sorbus high tree?

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    1. The label say 4m high and 1.5m wide after 10 years Nadezda. Not big at all. It is highly recommended for small gardens.

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  9. I like this small variety of Sorbus. I had large ones in my Alaska garden but don't have that kind of space where I garden now so the smaller one would be grand. Thanks for introducing us!

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    1. You are welcome Peter :) Recommened for a small garden, it would make a nice addition.

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  10. That is a lovely small tree, Angie, and it is good to see it thinking about summer. I'm a fan of fastigiate trees- we put a tall thin Liquidamber in last autumn for a particular spot -and this one of yours is lovely. I wonder how long it will be before it hits 4 metres? I don't always believe the labels 😉

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    1. I think I am still naive enough to believe those labels ;) The thought did cross my mind at time of planting - we shall see.
      I had no idea there was a fastigiage Liquidamber - now that you've introduced me to that fact, this will be top of my list for when I finally get round to removing the decking up the top of the garden.

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  11. What a pretty tree. I love Joseph Rock but I don' t know this one. I love the foliage on your Viburnum. You have made a pretty woodland corner.

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    1. Thank you chloris, the spring foliage on the viburnum was the reason I chose it for my garden. I look forward to that woodland corner developing in the coming years. Autumn 2015 will be the year I plant lots of Fritillaria - this area can get a bit wet and they should do just fine there.

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  12. Angie your little tree is leafing out nicely, I like the purple/green combination you have, as it grows the birds will love it more and more, the no berries could be that the birds saw them before you! that happens, I liked seeing the area it is growing in from a different view point, it is further from the fence than the other view implies, as it grows I imagine it will give a little privacy closer to your house, Frances

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    1. The birds already make full use of this corner Frances and as the plants mature, they will, as you say benefit even more.
      The plants always look way too close to the fence when I photograph them straight on but I do try to leave a good bit of space, I have learned that from watching the shrubs on the other side and how often I have to lop them off!

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  13. Wow! Extremely beautiful leaves and coloring. And I love the dots on the bark. Very pretty!

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    1. I love those wee dots too Anna - it will be interesting to see how long they remain prominent.

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  14. I do like Rowan trees and the Viburnum has wonderful foliage. Yes two trees can be a woodland!

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    1. Thanks for affirming my aspirations Brian - glad you think two trees can be a woodland :)

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  15. I reckon two trees count as a woodland. Even one would do if one's imagination is flexible enough. We see scenes differently. I think this specially applies to gardens where plants are often references to memories: so where there's one cowslip - there's a field; where there's a primrose - a country bank; one rose beside a path and it's a rose garden with fountains and walkways; one vine - and we are in Italy.

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    1. You put it so much better than I ever could Lucy - I thank you for that :)

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  16. Your Sorbus Autumn Spire is coming away nicely Angie. I think Rowan is hard to beat for year round interest and if it takes after Joseph Rock it will be a beauty when mature.

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    1. I hope so too Alistair. You had some lovely ones in Aberdeen didn't you?

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  17. I adore sorbus leaves, so pretty unfurling. Great tree choice Angie, and I love the partnering with the viburnum, what gorgeous spring foliage it has. If I wasn't still in my pyjamas I would race out to see if my rowan has bumpy bark... And yes, definitely a woodlandy area, and as Lucy says, if it evokes that feel, one tree or three or thirty does it. Coming along nicely.

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    1. I'm sure just as soon as practical you will be checking Janet :) I'm happy that everyone thinks two trees can be a woodland, just what I wanted to hear.

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  18. Thanks for the update on your Sorbus, I hope you get a good crop of orange berries this year. They are so ornamental and popular with the birds.

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  19. Nice looking tree Angie. It's always exciting when something you planted finally takes off after a couple of years. Well done you and the tree :)

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  20. Hello Angie girl and thank you so much for stopping by my blog : )
    I love your tree and it will be a beauty no doubt in my mind ! .. Any plant/tree/shrub with "Autumn" in the name is always a beauty.
    I am expecting my Fringe tree to arrive this week and can't wait to plant it .. there is something about gardening that for the people who aren't madly in love with it ... well they have no idea what it feels like , do they ? LOL
    To see plants come to life here in Canada after a brutal winter ... well we get so excited it is ridiculous !
    Thanks again for dropping by .. I love to see visitors from Scotland especially ... my father's family emigrated from Scotland mid 1700's .. our weird name is Glencross ! haha ... well my maiden name .. my married name is Irish O'Connor ! haha
    Hope you drop by again and we can chat !
    Joy : )

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  21. Looking good, isn't it great to see the leaves on the trees at last. Rowans are such great all year round trees, I love them.

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  22. Finally catching up Angie...your young tree is much like mine....slow to bloom and this worried gardener was unsure mine would be back....but I like the leaves of your tree...they remind me of our native sumac.

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