Friday, 15 May 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day May 2015

The recent winds and fierce rain fall has taken it's toll on a few plants here and there.  Those winds were described as brisk the other evening by the weather forecaster.  Brisk?  I think he under estimated them just a wee bit.  It's still cold and frosts are still forecast.  Will it ever end!!

The rotten weather has allowed me to continue with the decorating indoors, I am now the hallway (upstairs and down), it's all doors, doors and yet more doors.  I feel as if eyes are turning square. Still, the end is in sight and I'll then be able to enjoy the garden a bit more.

Seeing that it's the middle of the month, it's time to post our Garden Blogger's Bloom Day posts.  I didn't need much persuading to take a break and get outside with the camera.  If you are in need of a pick up, please pop over to May Dream Gardens and rejoice with other bloggers as we share what's blooming in our gardens on the 15th of every month.  Everyone is welcome.

For a change, I thought I'd start out in the front garden.  The front garden which is the focus of my EOMV is coming along nicely.  There are many plants on the cusp of blooming but sadly they haven't made this month's post.
Geum Dingle Apricot, Potentilla (variety unknown), Erysimum Walbertons Fragrant Star, Geum Totally Tangerine and
Iris pumila Cherry Garden 
Lack of sun has meant that I've seen very few bees and even fewer butterflies recently.  An orange tip flitted by the other afternoon but that's been about it really.  Through the side gate, the side garden which I have really done little with over the years and is in dire need of a make over.  Standing by the gate - the view up towards the back garden.  There are some nice plants in there but being so long and narrow I find it difficult to bring them all together.  It's time I think I had a good long hard think about what I'd like to achieve here.  It's shady until mid afternoon, the soil out there is the best the garden has to offer and that's been without any amendment from me.


In the foreground, an inherited Rhododendron is just beginning to bloom.  A couple of self sown aquilegia are now too big for their boots and their particular chosen spots for that matter. Sandwiched between them Brunnera macrophylla Jack Frost.  The mid section is still a mass of foliage right at the minute.  At the far end, Magnolia stellata is holding on to the last of it's blooms, Dicentra exima King of Hearts, Lamium orvala, Dicentra Lamprocapnos spectabalis and Brunnera macrophylla Hadspen Cream are flowering right now.  Foliage pays an important part in this side garden and I like all the different shades and textures.

Dicentra exima King of Hearts and Magnolia stellata

Corydalis flexuosa Blue Dragon
The shady bed in the graveled area which was extended and had a bit of a reshuffle back in autumn has started filling out.  In the end nearest the house, Cotinus Dusky Maiden (when it finally leafs out) will dominate this bed in summer, meantime Bergenia Overture is going over and Polygonatum multiflorum is just coming into bloom.  Just out of shot purple leafed Corydalis is also blooming alongside the pale blue Pulmonaria with no name.   Ajuga Burgundy Glow, which I thought I had got rid of has appeared right in the centre of this group and is hidden by it's neighbours.  You can just make out a couple of blue flowering spikes in the left of the shot.  I'll leave it for now and see if I can find an alternative home for it.
Polygonatum multiflorum, Bergenia Overture and friends
In the middle section of this bed, there are many 'wee' plants blooming.  Again, the taller plants will hide these when they have gone over.  I am thrilled to find the Kirengeshoma is now showing.  I had myself in a bit of a tizzy a couple of weeks back as I thought it hadn't survived it's move.  I hope that the frosts haven't done too much damage to it.  It didn't flower the first year I grew this because the new growth was blackened by frost.  Last year it did well, hopefully it's late emergence has helped. The hellebores are being left to their own devices this year in the hope that I may get some seedlings to bring on.
Corydalis flexuosa Pere David, Polemonium yezoense Purple Rain, Epimedium x youngianum niveum and Primula Wanda
Primula japonica Miller's Crimson just coming into bloom 
Geranium pyrenaicum Bill Wallis
On the sunnier side of the graveled area, there is very little in bloom right now.  Making the biggest impact in this border right now is Phlox subulata Emerald cushion and Primula vulgaris Drumcliffe is doing it's best to hold on in there.  Geranium pyrenaicum Bill Wallis is the first geranium to bloom this year.  Disappointingly, the new variegated Euphorbia characias Glacier Blue and an older Euphorbia characias Silver Swan are really struggling.  I think it's time I faced facts and accepted they don't want to grow there.    Peonies, poppies, Alliums and Honeysuckle are gearing up to bloom but sadly not in time for this month's post.  
Phlox subulata Emerald Cushion
There really is nothing new in bloom up in the back garden proper.  The Camellias, Pulmonaria and Drumstick Primula have almost gone over on the shady side.  The Primula are last year's divisions and they haven't half filled out.  I need now to separate the white ones from the pale purple ones. They will find a home in the area I now call my mini woodland.
 
In the Mini Woodland - I think perhaps I need to find a bit more of an interesting name for it but for now Mini Woodland will do.  I have to get right down flat on my belly to get a decent shot of the Primula still flowering there.
Primula vulgaris 
Beneath the Heptacodium, Anemone nemorosa (courtesy of Annette @ My Aberdeen Garden) is blooming it's heart out.  It's one of my favourites right at the minute.

Anemone nemorosa
Another favourite this week grows in a pot at the front of the shed.  Clematis cartmanii Pixie is a plant who's hardiness rating for here in Scotland is not ideal but now in it's fourth year, it seems to be doing alright.  I never count my chickens though and always look on each year as it's last.   It is scented but it's not been warm enough to make it very noticeable.  Odd too that it has not been affected by the late frosts.



Lastly, blooms on a plant that will feature in my next Bloom and Grow post but I couldn't wait that long to share them with you.  Drum roll please.......Cornus x rutlan Ruth Ellen.  Very fetching I think.

48 comments:

  1. Uno spettacolo!! Hai troppe piante che voglio! Per esempio quella bergenia, bellissima!! Anche il Lamium orvala è spettacolare ma purtroppo è troppo grande per il mio piccolo giardino!! Ma da quando la Dicentra ha cambiato nome? Prima era molto più facile :D

    Un saluto e a risentirci :D

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    1. Thank you Pontos - I always get the impression that your garden is larger than mine. I do tend to pack in way too many plants. A bad habit I desperately need to break. The Dicentra changed its name a couple of years back (I think) and yest, far more difficult to say! Hope you are having a wonderful weekend :)

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  2. Very very nice!!! So many interesting plants in your garden. For instance I love that part of garden with the dark Japanese maple, the Magnolia and Dicentra exima. Clematis cartmanii Pixie is magnificent, I´ve seen it in gardencentres several times, but then I think no, not another not hardy plant for my garden, but when I see how flourishing yours is....... The Cornus is a beauty too.
    Wish you happy gardening !

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    1. Thank you Janneke - the Maple is the oldest plant in my garden, around 19 years old now. I brought it with me from my other garden. It's truly a beautiful shape - a purple waterfall almosts.
      The Clematis I did not expect to survive either Janneke, a miracle of sorts!

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  3. Dear Angie, your garden looks so pretty at this time of the year and it is amazing how many interesting plants you have that are in bloom right now! I think the third photo from the top with the Dicentra exima King of Hearts and Magnolia stellata and the burgundy red Acer is my favorite. Just love the color combinations! The Anemone nemorosa is a really lovely plant, white and dainty, just right up my alley! You don't lack motivation doing flat belly Primula vulgaris shots ;-), but as you said it was worth it. Great Photo!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. I love that Acer corner too Christina. The side garden is a wind tunnel yet the Magnolia and Acer don't seem to mind. Contrary to what the books tell us! The wee white Anemone is a lovely wee thing and would look great in your white border, if only it would survive, that is!

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  4. pretty amazing...especially if the weather has been as bad as you say.

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    1. Thank you Rickii - I suspect by the end of the month it will be even better. I may have to squeeze in another floral post by then. Watch this space!

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  5. Lovely post, Angie. I have this vision of you lying down to take photos of your plants now. The weather over here on the west coast has been just as bad as over your side ... rain, gales, rain and yet more gales!!! All the beautiful white blossom from our cherry trees is now confetti. Gorgeous cornus too ... I can't wait to see my recently planted one in bloom. Elizabeth

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    1. Is it the same Cornus Elizabeth. I totally fell for it when I saw it. I noticed in the weather forecast that almost the whole of Scotland is getting the rotten weather. Mind you we shouldn't be too surprised should we?

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  6. Despite your lousy weather, Angie, your garden is looking good - very, very good. I'm in love with that Clematis - I looked it up and discovered that it could grow here but its water needs present an issue so I quickly shelved that idea. Your beautiful Bergenia make me think about trying them again here. Happy GBBD and good luck with your home decorating effort!

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    1. Such a shame about the moisture issue for the Clematis Kris. To be honest though, this tend to survive on neglect and only gets a good water if and when I remember! Maybe if you afford to water it until it's roots are established in might do ok for you. Good luck in attempting the Bergenia again. Those fleshy leaves should mean it would cope with your climate. I suspect that my garden will probably kill it should we get severe rain!

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  7. The Cornus flowers are very pretty. I have a couple of beds like your side bed that have given me problems, trying to come up with a plan that works. Your primroses and anemone are lovely too. Happy GBBD!

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    1. Yes, a plan that works would suit me perfectly Alison. I am not overly keen on how the plants are growing together but everything in there seems to thrive which is why I am always hesitant about messing around with them! Hope your weekend is a good one :)

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  8. I can't get over how lovely your combination of Magnolia stellata and the Japanese maple are! You do have an eye for combining foliage... All those little geums look so sweet; I'll have to check whether there's any chance for them here. And you're certainly winning hearts for Clematis "Pixie" :)

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    1. It seems the Acer and Magnolia combo is proving popular Amy. It will be interesting to see if you have a chance of growing the Geums. There are some lovely ones out there.

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  9. Angie, how big is your garden? (in squaremeters) It looks so big. My Pullmonarias are most cutten back, they get podery mildew after flowering. I see, you also like geum. Spring is a wonderful time for gardening, but we need rain!

    Sigrun

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    1. Now you are asking Sigrun :) The back garden is around 200 square meters and the front is around 25. To be honest, I've never actually measured it but think that's about right for the two main planting areas. I cut back the Pulmonaria here but not because they get powdery mildew but because I think they look better later in the year that way. Yes, good steady warm rain would be better here too, freezing wintery rain is not so good.

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  10. Love your Clematis Pixie, it's so gorgeous! I also like your first Geum, Dingle Apricot that would look lovely in my sunrise border! Your clematis are ahead of mine, yours are looking beautiful. Great combinations throughout your garden!

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    1. Pixie is a wee cracker Pauline, I love it too. That wee Geum is very nice and I can see how it would fit in with your 'sunrise border.

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  11. Angie you have quite a lot blooming, I know just what you mean about this weather! you also have a lot of lovely textural foliage, I like your side garden, it has lots of texture with gems of flowers and it leads the eye nicely round but not too quickly, it gives a feeling of wanting to stop and look closer, your front garden has nice cheerful colour complimented by the richness of the iris, in the photo with the dicentra and magnolia I like how the dicentra flowers compliment the purple leaf plant near by, very nice, have a nice weekend, Frances

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    1. I love different textures in the garden Frances and do try my best at getting in right, so thank for noticing. The side garden is I suppose rather neglected except the top part where the Acer is and I currently don't stop and look often enough to really appreciate the plants there. You've encouraged me to do so, so thank you for that.

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  12. Your garden is lovely bursting at the seams with plants maybe one day mine will look like this too.

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    1. All too bursting Sue, things in some parts need a good thinning out now but I can't bear to sometimes. I'm sure with all the planning you've been doing lately, it will all come together.

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  13. The weather has been rather disappointing this side of the border too Angie. A cold wind blowing today spoilt what could have been a glorious day. It's interesting to read that plants can be tougher than their labels suggest such as Clematis cartmanii 'Pixie'. You've confirmed my suspicion that the plant growing in my mum's raised alpine bed is a little phlox so thank you. I'm not surprised that you could not wait to reveal your new purchase of a cornus :) It looks enchanting.

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    1. Sorry to read I am not alone with weather issues Anna. Glad to have help you with your ID, this plant is one of many that have long gone from the garden due to flooding, a sole survivor!

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  14. Yes, hasn't the weather been frustrating! Will it ever warm up? Despite this, your garden is looking lush, interesting, and sophisticated - I did enjoy this post. The Cornus x rutlan Ruth Ellen is especially elegant with those wavy, orchid-like petals.

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    1. Thanks Joanne. Your wee garden is hopefully a bit more sheltered by the surrounding tenements. It sure is an elegant Cornus. I can't stop staring at it - am I the only one that stares at new plants ;)

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  15. Great blog Angie, I am so fed up with this cold weather, it's holding everything back here on the hill. I think I might struggle to find anything new for this month's flower blog. Your Clematis Pixie is outstanding, gorgeous.

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    1. You are even worse off than I am Rona. Having just read your blog, you did well, with some gorgeous plants too boot :)

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  16. Sorry your weather is so unpleasant. Here the temperatures have been going up and down like a yo-yo. Even so, I love the 'Pixie' Clematis.

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    1. I'd settle for yo-yoing weather right now Jason. We are having cold air now from Iceland - it's all doom and gloom :)

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  17. Primulas, magnolia, love your maple, Angie. Your garden is very colorful.
    Happy GBBD!

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    1. Thank you Nadezda, it's good to have colour from the shrubs too.

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  18. Hi Angie,

    I love your little Clematis! Oohh, I think I know what I'll be on the hunt for soon... Does it have a long bloom period?

    There sure is plenty going on in your garden at the moment, how lovely. Really must get round to dividing my drumstick primulas soon. Just once I've recovered from the gardening I've done already this weekend!

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    1. C. Pixie has bloomed for a good few weeks now and is still looking pretty good. Being an early one, it doesn't flower for quite as long as the group 2 or 3 varieties. This one's always in stock in B&Q, or up here it is. You might find it in there on offer once it's gone over Liz.

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  19. Everything is certainly coming together Angie, I was particularly intrigued by your Clematis cartmanii 'Pixie' it looks a really useful addition to any garden. Glad your Kirengeshoma survived, they are a late starter so I can imagine you were pretty anxious. You mention your Heptacodium, I must admit after you first showed it on your blog I bought one, this from a man who raises almost everything from seed! In fact I can say your blog has cost me more money than any other in reflecting your choices :-)

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    1. You've made me feel awful now Rick :) You won't be disappointed and where you are, you'll get more of a guarantee for blooms. I dare to ask - where did you buy it? I ask because I've seen them for sale online for a ridiculous amount of money. A well known online shop sells a specimen in a 12l pot for 60 quid, yes I did say 60! To think I paid around £12 for mine at Binny's. I'll do my best not to tempt you any more.

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  20. You have some great combinations of foliage and flowers, Angie. I especially like the Bergenia/Polygonatum combiniation. I hope your weather warms soon and the sun makes a nice, long visit.

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    1. Thank you Beth. I try my best to get the combos right, not always first time though :)

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  21. Hello!
    You have some beautiful blooms right now. I love my geums, so I was glad to get a look at some of yours. I think my favorite combination is the Dicentra 'King of Hearts' echoing the Japanese maple in the background. So lovely!

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    1. The Acer and Dicentra are proving very popular Linnae. I love it too!

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  22. Bet your forecaster isn't a gardener, Angie, as we tend to feel things a bit differently. Your borders look great, you wouldn't think they've suffered from the wind. Just got Corydalis 'Spinners' and hope it'll do well for me. That Pixie-girl is absolutely stunning - have admired it already on FB and think I may put it on my list. It looks rather good grown in a mound.

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    1. Thanks Annette. Pixie is recommended for growing this way Annette, it is a beauty. You wouldn't be disappointed with it.

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  23. Angie, it is all looking so good! Despite the cold weather! So many pretty combinations and plants.... G. 'Totally Tangerine' and Drumstick Primula are still on my list to acquire. And congrats on your dogwood! There are so many in the US, that I think they are easy to take for granted. It looks so well above the pink too. :) Good work gardener!
    ~Julie

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  24. Angie that is a different Rhododendron color...one I have never seen here. And I love the shade border...it actually is all beautiful...the whole garden.

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  25. That cornus has a stunning flower. Worthy of a drum roll indeed.

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