Friday, 22 May 2015

Foliage Follow Up May 2015

I don't often find time to join Christina and friends for a Foliage Follow Up post but this month I've been able to squeeze a post in.  I seem to have plenty of time on my hands this week.  Christina, apologies for not being as regular a contributor as I'd like to be.    

Foliage plays an important part in my garden or at least I want it too.  I feel in a few spots around the garden I've managed to get it just about right.  Of course, there are a few clashes here and there that did not transfer from my mind's eye into the garden.  So what combos or individual plants are pleasing me right now - join me as I take a daunder.

Ferns, Hostas and other foliage interest plants have been very slow this year, lack of moisture I think. It has been an incredibly dry spring, certainly not the norm for Scotland. 

Asplenium scolopendruim are dotted all about the garden


The King, Dryopteris affinis Cristata, has finally got going.  



The pretty little Polypodium scouleri, has taken a good couple of year to settle in but is now finding it's way.  This wee fern is said to be better suited for growing on the West Coast of Scotland and in Ireland than here on the east coast.    


It's not all good though!  Hosta Frances Williams looking the worse for wear!


In a far better state, Hosta Blue Cadet is romping away in comparison to all the others that grow here.



Spring growth on Epimediums are hard to beat.  I won't bore you with them all but here's the best of the bunch right now.

Epimedium x perralchicum Fronhleithen



Epimedium Rubra


Epimedium warleyense Ellen Willmott



Astrantia Ruby Wedding and Polemonium Yezonense Purple Rain, the grey in the foliage will later be picked up by a japanese painted fern (Athyrium niponicum).  It's just a bit slow right now and is merely an inch or so high (just out of shot).


The new foliage from Iris pseudoacorus Variegata standing proud, sadly though the bleeding heart and Acer have taken a bit of a battering.  I'm not sure I can blame the weather entirely, I suspect that the cats have had a helping hand as they love to jump around and play in here.


A closer look at the gorgeous chartreuse foliage of Aquilegia vulgaris Purple Emperor that sits in the background.


Textures and shade of green come by the way of Lamium orvala, Acontitum napelensis Gletcheris and Ligularia przwalskii (variety unknown) give an overcrowded jungly feel to a shady corner.


My tendency to over fill an area means these school girl errors don't take long to come back and bite me on the back side!  3 years and it's full to bursting in there! Foliage textures and shades near the Acer that many of you admired in my previous post.  In there we've got Pieris, Acer, Lamprocapnos(Dicentra), Japanese Holly Fern and Epimedium.  Just out of shot Lamium and Brunnera too.  I didn't zoom out too far, the frosted foliage of Pieris (P. japonica Flaming Silver) really spoils the look!  There might even be a Hosta in there too!  Can you tell I hate bare patches of soil?  


The coral bark maple (Acer palmatum Eddisbury) draws the eye away from less than perfect foliage of Ligularia dentata Desdemona.  Carex testacea, whose new grow it not quite so vibrant yet should pick up the colour of the flowers on Geum Flames of Passion.  I like all these colour together.


Lastly, I am not sure if I should be grateful or worried that Lamium maculatum Beacon Silver has now made a sizeable clump.  I remember getting this as a tiny wee rooted division around 4 years ago.  I had plans for it but I can't for the life of me remember just what those plans were!  Do you do this or are you all very methodical with your planning?  I just wish I could be!


It's the bank holiday weekend and I intend to spend as much time in the garden as I can.  I have deliberately not checked the weather forecast.  There is plenty to do.  Whatever you have planned, whether in the garden or not - have a good one! 

36 comments:

  1. You have some truly beautiful foliage plants in your garden Angie; I'm a fan of covering as much soil as possible too; so I know about having to divide and spread things later. Epimedium is a very underrated plant, I love to see large swathes of them, it is too hot for me to grow them here unfortunately. Thank you for taking the time to join with GBFD and sharing your bounty!

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    1. Yes, the heat over there would not do for the Epimediums Christina. I could have a border full of them and not tire of looking at them. Speaking of dividing and spreading, my plants are now all reasonable sizes that I should be able to do a lot of than soon. I'll maybe start editing rather than adding to my collection.

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  2. Your foliage combinations are beautiful, Angie. I'm once again experiencing a severe case of Epimedium envy.

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    1. You can enjoy my Epimedium all you like Kris :)

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  3. I do like the foliage of the Epimedium and the variegated Iris. I bought one last year, it has just flowered.

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    1. I had no flowers last year, hoping to get some this year on the variegated Iris. I check almost daily for signs but none yet.

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  4. Dear Angie, gosh I always drool over your pictures! Your foliage combinations are just terrific! Even though you wrote, that you are having an unusual dry spring, everything looks so lush, fresh and juicy in your garden.
    I think that overplanting your garden simply works ;-)! Take for example the 3rd photo from the bottom: The way the epimedium picks up the dark blood red hues of the acer and the aquilegia and the bleeding hard continue in the red scheme by contributing some lighter pink/redish hues and some other blooms (plant names are unknown to me) echoing those colors in even lighter hues, just perfect. And completely fascinating. I feel always so inspired when I read your posts and believe I learn a lot, by just studying the photos, but somehow I can't repeat it in my own garden. You are doing magic! Thanks so much for sharing your lovely garden on the internet!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. Obviously not as dry as yours Christina but more than the norm here. I spent the afternoon watering as much as I can. Most of my plants prefer not to dry out and many were toiling today. We finally reached 20 on the thermometer! Thanks for the compliments, they truly are appreciated :)

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  5. I hate bare soil too, and as my garden is still mainly bare soil being less than a year old I am even more envious of your luxuriant foliage. It doesn't look overcrowded to me at all. Jungly is a much better description. Plenty of inspiration for me here in your wonderful photos. I especially admire your lush, healthy epimediums, must get some of my own. I agree it has been frustratingly dry here in eastern Scotland, and complicating that has been the relentless wind, which dries the soil and foliage out even faster. I pour endless can of water on the garden, only for it to look like the sahara 12 hours later.

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    1. You should try Epimediums Joanna - I now have around 6 different varieties and each one is a pleasure. Yes, the watering - been doing that myself all afternoon. Many plants were struggling with today's heat.

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  6. hmm, might I respectfully inform you that not all of Scotland has had a dry spring, ;o)
    you have some beautiful foliage Angie, I have Lamium maculatum Beacon Silver too and I planted mine where I hoped it would make a sizable clump but it has not, I've had it about 4 or 5 years, sorry to see your hosta, do you put sand around slug and snail prone plants? I find it helps as they do not like it, I love the iris foliage and your coral bark maple looks nice with the fence behind showing the lovely shape, Frances

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    1. Apologies Frances - I should have written the East Coast. I've tried everything to help stop the slug and snail issues but nothing seems to work except the pellets and I don't want to go back to using them. I don't have nearly as much damage as I used too and don't see a fraction of the slugs I used to either. We have hedgehogs around here, I hope they are responsible for their demise.

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  7. Great photos and some lovely combinations too, foliage is so important in the garden and you can create a real tapestry using only coloured foliage. The up side of close planting is there is less bare soil for weeds to colonise :) I do like how your foliage all merges together, too much bare soil here still.

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    1. You probably plant far more sensibly that I do Rona, therefore it will take time fill out those spaces. You are right re the weeds. It does help.

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  8. Gorgeous as ever, the coral maple and epimediums especially. Planning? What's that?
    Have a super weekend x

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    1. Yes, planning - a concept that is never in the forefront of my mind! I'm more a suck it and see kinda gal! Hope your weekend is a good one too.

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  9. I too tend to cram things in. Then they die. Then I have bare space. I'm impressed by the leaves of the Iris pseudoacorus variegata.

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    1. I have found on more than one occasion that plants have died because I've crammed too many things in Esther - you are not alone :)

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  10. Foliage plays an important role in the garden at this time of year between the spring and summer flowrering plants

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    1. You are exactly right Sue, everything is just waiting to burst into bloom.

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  11. Those Epimediums are looking really good. The new Spring foliage is really worth waiting for.

    I'm also someone who over fills, but it's so hard not too. Young plants look so small on their own, so add in some friends. The next thing you know it's a rave in the shady border. Will I ever learn? Probably not ;) And i have to say that I like the jungly feel with the Lamium orvala, Acontitum napelensis Gletcheris and Ligularia przwalskii. Keep on filling Angie!

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    1. Incredibly hard not too over fill Julieanne, that and my bad habit of buying too many plants. I live too near to so many wonderful nurseries! The Lamium etc started out as an experiment and one I think worked. Glad you like it too :)

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  12. Angie, I have fallen in love with the variegated iris. Well, let's just say that it's the only plant of yours that I have ALLOWED myself to fall in love with, because it's probably the only one that would have a fighting chance to survive in my climate. I absolutely love the jungly feel of plants bunched up. I do the same, feeling that it looks more natureal and hoping that each will provide a bit of shade for the other while impeding evaporation.

    As for planning, I only do so when I have a large, blank canvas of earth to deal with and have bought plants in multiples. Otherwise, I prefer shooting from the hip!

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    1. I feel the exact same when I see gardens in hot/dry climates too. Gave up trying most of them in pots - it all got too much work in winter. The foliage of the Iris turns green later in the year, which adds another dimension to the interest. It seems there are more of us that much prefer to shoot from the hip than not - I'm often guilty of not paying much attention to height either and then end up in real trouble!

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  13. 'Cramscaping' is what some of us call it, and it not only creates a wonderful tapestry, but also makes a pretty good barrier against weeds. I must confess that I like the look of some space around special plants, but the extra weeding is hardly worth the trade-off. If I could wind up with your "jungly" look, I'd be quite happy.

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  14. Not the least bit methodical - after all, one never knows which plants will thrive or what sizes they will eventually reach! Or is that only my excuses!! At any rate, I love your jungly look, and I can only hope to eventually get my plantings that dense ;-)
    I love the Astrantia and Polemonium combination, and the epimediums are just gorgeous! I tried E. rubrum (as I recall) in my earlier garden, but even there I think it languished for lack of moisture. But they are such exquisite plants :)

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  15. Thanks Angie for the new to me word in the form of 'daunder' :) You have some fine foliage plants there as well as most attractive combinations. I hope that the weather is obliging and that you are able to garden to your heart's content this long weekend.

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  16. Great display of foliage Angie, funny how the slugs will devastate any hosta with pale foliage but are less attracted to the darker grey/green cultivars.

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  17. That foliage shot adjacent to the Japanese Maple is ... wow! I'm a huge fan of Epimediums and Aquilegias, and you have some stunning specimens!

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  18. Beautiful foliage, especially that of the various Epimediums is stunning.

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  19. Pure dead brilliant pictures of your foliage plants Angie. I have been there with the over planting habit and I am sure it is starting over again, does look good in your garden though. Epimediums are a favourite of mine although as yet I have still to introduce some.

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  20. I love all your foliage, specially the epimediums. You are so good at weaving texture and colour together to make a gorgeous carpet. I am like you, I can' t stand bare soil and I like to pack' em in.

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  21. Beautiful foliage Angie. I like your Asplenium scolopendruim. I used to have one but lost it. I should look for a replacement.

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  22. Those Epimediums look great! And I love the Dryopteris fiddleheads.

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  23. Your garden is so bright now Angie. I love your fern, maple. I see you plan to grow different foliage plants very attentively.

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  24. Ferns, hosta and epimedium do make for wonderful foliage...you have some great ones especially Dryopteris affinis Cristata

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