Sunday, 31 May 2015

End of Month View May 2015

April 2015
It dawned on me a couple of hours ago that it was the last day of the month and I had not prepared any shots of the front garden this week.   The wind is still very persistent and making it extremely difficult to take pictures.  Wider shots are fine but going through the many close up shots I've taken, I probably could have saved my time and not bothered.


Looking west and you can really see everything is filling out now.  I can't get over how lush and thick that front hedge is looking.  I do note though that the plants in the bed to the right (nearest to the house) are all reaching inwards towards the centre of the garden.  I thought that the sun came round the house early enough not to have such an effect, I was obviously wrong!   I finally got round to removing the Nandini domestica Gulf Stream, it did not like this windy site at all and had looked absolutely rotten for months.

Looking west End of May 2015

You will see that I have failed yet again in getting some grass seed down.  An Iris has sprung up almost slap bang in the middle of the arch.  It does look odd but I will let it do it's own thing until autumn and then find it an alternative home.  The bearded and dutch Iris all have buds but are still rather shy.  It's still cold here during the night.  In fact three mornings this week (when I've finished work at 3am) the frost warning has come on in the car. 

The view towards the house shows Rosa The Lady of Shalott, I just wish I could remember one L and two Ts without having to look it up each time I write it, she is by far the fullest and tallest rose right now.  All are looking reasonable right now but they too are very slow at putting on buds.  They were fed with Toprose back in spring and it's my understanding that they should not be fed again until after the first flush of blooms.  What do other UK gardeners do with their roses?  Might they benefit from some sort of liquid feed to encourage them a bit?


Standing by the front window the view outwards clearly shows how lush and healthy the privet hedge is looking.  I am fair impressed with how well the manure has worked, a job worth doing if you are ever considering it.
 

The shape of the lawn is most apparent from this angle.  It takes me longer to get the mower and edge trimmers out and set up that it does to mow it.  The flymo glides over this whole area in less than 3 minutes.  Mowing this lawn is no longer a chore.

Pleasingly the strappy Iris foliage is no longer annoying me, as predicted by one or two of you, they would be softened by the other plants as they filled out.  Instead, my annoyance this month turns to Geranium renardii.  You can make out those white blooms at the far side.  I debated and deliberated over adding white out here and it appears I should have taken heed.  There are one or two other white blooms still to come.  Namely Anthemis tinctoria Sauce Hollandaise and a couple of Leucanthemums.

There are a few gaps here and there which will be filled with some of my Salvia Amistad cuttings just as soon as I can get them in the ground.  Sadly, the parent plant did not make it through winter.  Other winter casualties are Achillea Terracotta and one of 3 Achillea Feuerland.   I did not expect either of these to perish.

What's blooming out there right now?

If my money had to be place on any plant not returning Verbascum Clemantine would have been favourite.  However, it is just coming into bloom.  Another plant that is not liking the wind.  I've stuck in a bit of support but that isn't working.  I will need to wait until a calmer day to untie it and see what I can do about it.  V. Clematine's colours are perfect for my scheme.

Verbascum Clemantime

Erysimum Walberton's Fragrant Star is still looking good.  The silver edged Lady's Mantle, Alchemilla conjuncta is also putting out some frothy blooms.  This is my favourite Alchemilla and in all honesty was another I was rather sceptical about how it would look out here but I think it's looking ok.
Erysimum Walberton's Fragrant Star and Alchemilla conjuncta

Euphoriba griffithii Fireglow is one plant I could not be more pleased with.  Despite it's Tower of Pisa list, I love it!

Euphorbia griffithii Fireglow

I had hoped that last month's newbie would have opened it's delicate little blooms for this post.  Almost!  Lathyrus transsilvanicus, I've been told will cope well with the wind out here.  There is no mistaking this little thing as a member of the pea family is there?

Lathyrus transsylvanicus

Stuck in limbo Podocarpus x Young Rusty is neither in summer or winter colour.  It's at that in between stage.  I had at first thought the paler growth was some sort of bloom or cone but closer inspection allowed me to see it was just new growth.  This plant is, as I've only just discovered, is as toxic as Yew.
Podocarpus x Young Rusty

That's my lot for May's End of Month view so please join me over at The Patient Gardener's Weblog where many more bloggers post about their chosen views.  There's lots to see, it's a very popular meme.

51 comments:

  1. Angie your front garden is looking lovely, I love the cheeky iris that popped up under the arch, the soft apricot of the verbascum is beautiful, lots of lush varied and textural foliage, your hedge is looking great, I wonder if I could get hold of some manure for mine which is still see through,
    I enjoyed reading your plant buying post Friday morning and I wrote a comment but when I submitted it, I had a problem, BT have been messing with my connection again and cut me off, anyway, I love your new cornus and can see why you could not resist it and I'm glad you eventually did get your camassia, Frances

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    1. You must be so peeved off with BT Frances. What a bother you are having. I'll bet your hedge would be grateful for a good dose of manure - how do you purchase your compost? Do the same stockist not sell bags of the stuff. I bought mine by the bag at good old B&Q.

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    2. buying compost is not easy as the shop in town does not deliver outside of Stornoway and I am a long way out, I make my own and I used to collect seaweed in winter but the last 2 winters there hasn't been any washed up, I found out when a magazine I bought had a discount offer for Robert Dyas that they deliver for £4.99, which has been great, I ordered 5 bags of compost about a month ago, I just check B&Q and they do not deliver to the islands, in my last order to RD they were offering 2 chicken pellet manure boxes for the price of 1 so I have them and if I can get to weed under the privet I think I will use the chicken manure,
      thank you Angie for the offer of the Alchemilla, yes please, I love Alchemillas, since writing the post I have been thinking of some plants I already have that can be moved like the lamium that isn't growing too well in the middle front garden, it's interesting that talking about it (even though on the internet) has got me thinking of things I previously hadn't, even though some are in front of me, thanks Frances

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  2. It's easy to see things are filling in nicely, Angie! I would do just the same with the surprise iris ;-) The Erysimum is a real standout; I'll have to try some one day as I keep noticing how lovely they really are. I've never heard of Lathyrus transsylvanicus - it looks like a sweetheart! How big does it get?

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    1. That poor Iris Amy has probably been trodden on for month, I'm surprised it's actually managed to get this far. L. transsylvanicus reaches a height of 30cm according to the label. I've chosen to grow it at the front of the border where I hope it will fill out. I've taken some cuttings of the Erysimum but on reading further yesterday, I think I've done them wrong. I shall have to see if they root. If not, I'll try again.

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  3. Dear Angie, your front yard looks absolutely fabulous! It has filled out so much in comparison to last month, it is always a miracle that nature performs each year, isn't it? I really like the neat round lawn in the middle of the beds and your predominant color scheme of yellow, bronze and green is very exciting that yo don't get to see that often. I think it is a rather difficult color scheme to work with, but you nailed it!
    Talking about color schemes, I feel that the white flowering Geranium renardii adds just the right amount of interest. I observed in others blogs that even though there is a strict color scheme it is good to break it at times. I think otherwise the garden can become too sterile and rigid. Just my two cents and maybe I am biased anyways because I like the color white so much ;-).
    My favorite plant in your garden in the moment is the verbascum 'Clemantime', gosh, what a beauty that is!
    Thanks for this inspiring post, again!
    Wishing you a nice start into the beginning week!
    Christina

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    1. Because the front garden is so sunny I thought the colour scheme would work also everything needed to complement the species nasturtium that grows up through the hedge when it flowers. It was tricky deciding what to do out here, I just hope I've got most of it right as the climber is very in your face when it blooms.
      I just knew you'd like the white flower. It's going nowhere right now so it may grow on me or I might not take issue with it for too long.

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  4. Tower of Pisa List, you made me laugh!!! My Euphorbia is spreading quite rampantly and I will have to start editing soon. Thankfully it's in a small, confined border. What do you grow on your arch? I love the verbascum, beautiful colour!

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    1. I've been told and read that this Euphorbia is a spreader but thus far only the two stalks that was there when I bought it is what it has at the moment.
      Growing on the arch, only one side has anything growing on it at the moment. Rosa Teasing Georgia, although I planted a shrub version rather than a climber as I had read it makes a good size and since the arch isn't too big I didn't want to over whelm it. I may have to expect not too much from the roses this year, we shall see.

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  5. There is such a big difference between April & May - plants really got growing in May. I've got quite a few plants that are behind with their flowering because of the high winds and cold, and I'm guessing your roses are just waiting for it to be a bit less cold and windy.

    I really like the colour of that Verbascum Clemantime flower, and your photo of Euphorbia griffithii Fireglow reminded me how gorgeous this Euphorbia is. One for my list, definitely.

    I can't see the Geranium renardii so unable to comment. It might be one of those plants that you notice but not anyone else. Probably worth waiting to see how the other white plants look before deciding to remove it.

    Spring has arrived in your front garden and it's looking great Angie.

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    1. I hope you are right Julieanne, bad weather set too continue - is there any light at the end of the tunnel?!
      I am so pleased I chose that Euphorbia. I had admired it for a long time but did not really have the best conditions for it round the back. It should do well here with the good drainage. As for the Geranium, you are probably right - it's difficult to see in the shot above.

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  6. We have paving block set lower that the grass round the border edge so can mow above the and have very little edging to do.

    You beds looks lovely and have filled nicely, and the front garden looks great. Must admit our roses are only fed at the start of the year.

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    1. A block around the edge is a good idea Sue. I've probably got more than enough to do that here, something worth thinking about in the future. I've only ever fed my other roses once in the year too. All the ones planted out here in the front were done so with a good helping of manure. I maybe don't want to over do it do I?

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  7. The bed is certainly swinging into action now, Angie! I think it looks great. I've recently fallen in love with the Euphorbia, although I've yet to find it locally and it's questionable if it could handle my climate. That Verbascum may be the prettiest one I've ever seen.

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    1. I'd have thought the Euphorbia would have done well with you Kris. I always thought they were drought resistant plants. I stand to be corrected of course. The Verbascum is a pretty one, a lucky find in a nearby GC. It was quite expensive, so am glad it's lived for 2 years! I've been reading up on doing root cuttings for next year.

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  8. Your front garden is looking fantastic Angie, Love the shape of your lawn! Euphorbia Fireglow will spread, but I think it depends on your soil. Mine spread for the first couple of years but now seems well behaved. Love the colour of your Verbascum!

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    1. Thanks Pauline. I am hoping the Euphorbia spreads a little bit and in the past they've struggled with my garden, we shall see how it goes out there in the front where drainage is far better.

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  9. Despite the relentless cold and wind, you garden has come along a great deal, Angie, and is looking lovelier every time. I have kept an eye on the weather forecast and battened my half-hardy annuals, delphs and experimental dahlia in the cold-frame for yesterday, today and tomorrow, as frost was indeed forecast, and I'm glad I made the effort since your car has been agreeing with it! Gale force winds tomorrow, then warmer days and nights after that, so everything can be left outside again. As for your roses... mine are slow too. I am sure they are just waiting for some warmth, then they'll be away. I feed mine once in March and once after the first blooms, and that does them fine. This time last year my roses were a disaster, covered in every type of pest and pox imaginable and not a bud in sight, then with some TLC they recovered and were in bloom by mid-June, it was quite amazing how quickly they got on once they were happier.

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    1. I hope you are right about the improvement with the weather Joanna - I am really fed up with it now. All the roses were new last year and I do worry a bit since there is a fair bit of cash invested in them!
      I will give the roses a feed when they've finished flowering for the first time and see how that works out for them.

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  10. Your front garden is looking great Angie with all the different shapes, textures and colours of leaves. I love the spiky iris leaves too, but then iris is one of my favourite plants. I too have a Nandina domestica which is looking very sickly. I bought it as a bargain, half dead and it never really got going. It didn't produce lovely red leaves which fell off in the winter either. Did you move yours or just get rid of it?
    Don't give up on your Erysimum cuttings - I did some of Bowles Mauve and I don't think I did anything special. They are growing beautifully, though I think that one is more robust than the yellow or orange varieties. I am going to try the others this Autumn. Your verbascum is a wonderful colour - it is not a plant I have tried yet.

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    1. Thanks for lifting my confidence re the Erysimum cuttings Annette. I stupidly read up on how to do it afterwards. Apparently I should have left what they call a heel on but I didn't I shall see how they work out and might give more a go if nothing happens after a few weeks.

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  11. Oh well done, your front garden looks so lovely. So many interesting plants. I love the colour of the Verbascum. I think we just need a bit of warm weather to bring on the roses. It has been so cold and wet.

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    1. You are right Chloris, heat and sun should see an improvement for many things.

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  12. I enjoyed reading your EOMV post Angie. What a fabulous and aptly named verbascum. I've not heard of that one before so off to investigate forthwith. Congratulations on getting the salvia cuttings through the winter :) Like you I've lost the mother plant too even though it was also kept in the greenhouse over winter.

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    1. I intend to take root cuttings of the Verbascum later in the year Anna. After the success with the salvia cuttings, it's onwards and upwards.
      Strange that you lost the Salvia after keeping it in the greenhouse. I had read that the hardiness was borderline but would have expected it to survive with you.

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  13. Your neighbors must love living next to you, Angie. Your garden is lovely. I use composted manure on all my beds and swear by it to make everything lush and healthy. Also, I advocate getting rid of as much lawn as possible, and love yours. P. x
    (This is the 2nd time I've tried to comment. Hope it goes through this time!)

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    1. Thanks Pam. This wee lawn is just a nice size to be too much bother! Glad you finally managed to post, I often have that trouble with wordpress blogs due to signing in and out.

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  14. I am sure Verbascum Clemantine is on my wish list - where did you get it from? I have daffodils which pop up in the middle of one of my paths and every year I say I will move them and I never do!
    I am most impressed with how well shaped your lawn is, I tried to do a circular one once and it was always wonky. It all looks very good and I think you are being super critical about the poor geranium!

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    1. Thanks Helen. The Verbascum was bought at a local nursery. New Hopetoun Garden Centre. I intend to take some root cuttings later in the year. If they are a success I should have a few to give away. I'll let you know if and when. I tend to be too critical and often get proven wrong, so watch this space!

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  15. Your front garden is looking lovely.. that Verbascum Clementine is gorgeous, my verbascums are bowing in the wind too! Be glad when the weather is calmer.

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    1. Thanks Julie. the weather continues to be rotten here. Here's hoping for good weather soon, eh!

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  16. Quanto sono cresciute nelle prime immagini!! Complimenti! Io quel Verbascum l'ho perso 2 mesi dopo averlo piantato :D certe piante è meglio se non le compero nemmeno :D!! E il Podocarpus rimane sempre un sogno, chissà se un giorno avrò spazio per lui :)

    Un saluto e sempre complimenti per il giardino!

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    1. One day you will have your Podocarpus I'm sure Pontos. I hope you are having a good weekend in your garden :)

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  17. Everything is filling out beautifully in your garden, it's looking lovely, it is so cold for the beginning of June, I'm back to wearing all my winter layers again. And the wind! Our patio is littered with green leaves and bits of tree.

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    1. It's so disappointing having to bring all the winter gear back out Rona isn't it. I work outdoors all night and have not taken off my winter clothes yet, even my hat is still on each night. Brrrrrr!

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  18. Hi Angie,
    I like your verbascum. I bought a similar one recently but pink.
    As for your Euphorbia griffithii Fireglow it puzzled me for a while as it looks quite different from mine which I bought as Fireglow. I went outside to have a look at them and I think what happened is that the original plant has disappeared but it had selfseeded. However the new plants did not come true to seed. The look is identical but the colour is chartreuse with red stems. What makes me think they are a next generation is that some have red stems and other green ones - I had never noticed it before!

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    1. I tried a similar pink one years ago Alain, Jackie I think it was called. It rotted during a wet summer!
      I think some or maybe all Euphorbia are prolific self seeders Alain. Maybe you'll have a couple of nice plants out of them all. You could be sitting on a gold mine!

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  19. Hi Angie,

    Your front garden is looking very nice. I dont know how uou have the patience for cutting your lawn. Mine is a little larger and drives me insane having to bring the mower round just for 5 minutes of actual mowing. But i also know I can't get rid of it.

    I'm enjoying your euphorbia... Which is strange for me as in general I'm not a fan. But i do like the orange. Hrm. Where could i shoe-horn it into my garden???

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    1. I can take or leave Euphorbia usually too since they tend to struggle here a bit and always horrid with rust. So far I'm quite please with Fireglow, I hope that doesn't change. I'm sure you will find a spot if you look closely enough Liz :)

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  20. Your color scheme is coming together nicely. The keyhole shape of the patch of grass is a nice touch.

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    1. Thanks Rickii - the scheme is just as I imagined, which makes a real change. I don't think I could live without lawn, a garden always need a bit of lawn in my opinion.

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  21. Alchemilla conjuncta is a new plant to me is it widely available? I use a liquid seaweed feed as a boost to any plants in need, it is suggested it helps keep roses healthy. I would lay another stepping stone/slab into the lawn to cope with the foot traffic instead of reseeding.

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    1. Alchemilla conjuncta is one I've seen for sale in a few nurseries up here Brian therefore would think it is. If you fancy it and have no luck sourcing it, let me know I will happily send you down a wee piece.
      Was thinking the exact same thing re a slab, I think it may work. Watch this space!

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  22. Hi, Angie!
    How your garden changed this May! I love Erysimum Walberton's Fragrant Star and especially its leaves. I see your roses are tall and mine are mostly growing too. The lawn shape is interesting!
    Happy June!

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    1. Thank you Nadezda. I'm sure your roses will be coming along just nicely, as will mine when it heats up a bit!

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  23. Your front garden is looking so lush and colourful Angie, I really like your golden scheme and that verbascum is a beauty. I have had ‘Fireglow’ on my wish-list for a while, perhaps I can find a space for one in my new garden, it’s lovely.
    As for the roses, I must admit I am a lazy gardener when it comes to fertilizing, I use slow-release on almost everything except vegetables. My roses get fed twice a year, in early March and in July. But I have a longer season than you, I cut down the roses in last week of January, they start to flower in April and go on until December. Feeding twice is definitely necessary down here, not sure if you will need the same. How is your ‘Crimson Cascade’ doing? I left my original one at my old house and will have to go back in the autumn to make myself a cutting as I have none – didn’t think I would need one when I gave away all 3 I had :-) It’s prone to blackspot down here though, have you got the same issue with it? Hope it/they flower beautifully for you this year!

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  24. Angie I really enjoyed seeing your garden as it has grown in so nicely...lots of color and lush foliage....but ouch still cold weather. Your garden seems to like it though!

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  25. Hello Angie and thank you for stopping by my blog : )
    I love that wooden arbor that makes such a beautiful statement piece for your gorgeous garden !
    Your plants look very happy indeed , wind or not ... they are special .. I almost got that euphorbia myself .. I don't have one in the garden so maybe if another spot comes up ? haha ... I painted myself into a corner with all the plants I have now .. and a few more to come! yikes !
    Lovely garden !
    Joy : )

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