Friday, 1 May 2015

End of Month View April 2015

March ended with showers of rain, hail and sleet, lo and behold April has ended the exact same way! 
March 2015
The high daytime temperatures we had a couple of weeks ago are a mere memory now.   Don't get me wrong, any rain is welcome and has saved me a good few hours with the hose. 

Looking through the arch, it's obvious that the plants are now coming on leaps and bounds.  The privet hedge it seems has relished from the couple of bags of manure I dug in there early March.  This I think is as lush as I've ever seen it.   Twice now I've been out to buy some grass seed and came home without it.  Easily distracted me!


Looking west - End of April 2015



Cotinus Grace in the right hand corner is not making much impact right now.  Cotinus are very slow to get going here and it can be nearer the end of May before it finally gets going.  The blooms I am none to keen on, which is just as well as Grace will need to be kept in check out here. 




A plant I am loving right now and can't wait until it matures and really shows itself off is Euphorbia griffithii Fireglow.  What a fascinating creature it is.   I paired it with the Cotinus hoping that the dark foliage would be the perfect foil for those greens/red and oranges.   From what I can remember at time of purchase it flowers over a long period, so watch this space!


Standing at the front of the house and it's very clear from this angle that I have chose too many plants with strappy/sword/grass like foliage.  It's all a bit too vertical.  The daylilies, iris and kniphofia stand out like a sore thumb, the Iris in particular.  After years of longing for Iris blooms, I have finally found a spot in the garden that they seem to enjoy.  I wrote before about how they struggle round the back garden and a home out here in the front was their last chance.     They have been moved around quite a bit and which one is which will only become apparent when if they bloom.  
 


The view from the front gate, Rosa Lady of Shalott is romping away.  I'm sure that now we've had rain, the others will catch up.  The roses are intended to be the stars of the show a little later in the year.  There are 7 roses in the border and one growing over the arch.  I'm not sure if I've given a comprehensive list of them yet but they are Rose: Lady of Shalott, The Lark Ascending, Lady Emma Hamilton, Port Sunlight, Graham Thomas, Jude the Obscure and lastly Teasing Georgia grows against the arch.  All were selected to compliment the Tropaeolum that scrambles through the privet hedge.  The winter flowering jasmine I bought back in January has finally found a home too.  I will attempt to grow it over the trellis.  It was an impulse buy and as I had nowhere else suitable to grow it, it's getting a bit of a try out here.             







The clump of tulips that have came up blind have all been removed. I checked my records and they were a pot of T. Queen of the Night that I had hoped would improve if they grew in the ground, it seems not.



So what's blooming out here right now, not a lot, as you can see.  There are many plants poised, just waiting to burst into bloom.   Capturing a break in the weather, I took the opportunity to get a couple of shots.

This little geum has been a pleasure in my garden for a few years now and does well where ever I grow it.    The apricot/yellow blooms of Geum Dingle Apricot contrast nicely with Berberis Bagatelle.  In the foreground a dwarf Iris, I. pumila Cherry Garden is gearing up to bloom.   For the first time this year, I tried some Fritillaria Uva vulpis.  I'm not sure about them.  At this moment in time I could take or leave them.  Small groupings of around 10 or so bulbs were dotted around the garden and in each group there was a lot of foliage and very few flowers.  A bit disappointing really.


Near the front path, the yellow wallflower is just coming into bloom.  This was a cutting from a friend last year.  It looks rather lonely on it's own, I might just give some more cuttings a try and see how it looks in a larger group.  Aptly named, Erysimum Walberton's Fragrant Star, is indeed very fragrant.



The yellow perennial Potentilla that made it's way down from Aberdeen last year (thanks Annette), was divided into 3 plants.  Two have taken and the other is struggling just out of shot.  I look forward to seeing how these do and how they look when they spread and fill out a bit.



Podocarpus Young Rusty has finally been moved.  It's winter foliage makes it quite difficult to see.
I know it looks dead but looks can be deceiving.  It is very much alive and won't turn green until it warms up a bit.

Taking first prize in the 'Foliage of the moment' award just has to go to Epimedium x warleyense Ellen Willmott.  New to my garden in autumn, shy in flowering this year but all is forgiven.  I am hoping it will thrive out here, shade will be provided by Jude the Obscure when it finally gets going. Named after the gardener and plantswoman Miss Ellen Willmott.  At time of purchase, I actually went to buy E. Amber Queen but was told I'd like this more.  I'm glad I listened now.  



That's about it for my April End of Month View post, all I need do now is point you in the direction of The Patient Gardeners Weblog, where Helen hosts this extremely popular meme each month.   Pop over to see what others are posting about from their garden month.  See you there!

51 comments:

  1. Lo sapevo che non dovevo guardare questo post! Ora voglio tutte quelle piante :D il geum è una cosa spettacolare e quell'euforbia è il mio prossimo desiderio!! Intanto mi godo sempre il tuo Podocarpus che non avrò mai :D

    Un saluto e complimenti per tutto!!

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    1. I take it you have been unable to source the Podocarpus then Pontos. I will make sure I include a picture of it every month just for you :)

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  2. Hi Angie,

    Lovely catch-up with your garden. I'm way too nosey and love watching other's gardens grow. It's so much harder to appreciate your own and see only the bad some times.

    Looking very nice at the moment, I think you've done really well!

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    1. You've hit the nail on the head Liz - it is much harder to appreciate our own space and like you I''m nosy and really enjoy seeing what others are doing.

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  3. Your frontgarden is already looking very nice, the irises are doing great. Cotinus is always slow, the sam in my garden. You have a nice collection of roses planted, can't wait to see them flowering.

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    1. Those Iris are doing well Janneke, I do hope that they all flower this year. I've noticed in one or two gardens that Cotinus are slow, so it now doesn't make me feel so bad about mine.
      I look forward to seeing all those roses flower too :)

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  4. What a different a month makes. It's really taking off now. I love that Euphorbia and agree that the Geum Dingle Apricot works well with Berberis Bagatelle. I love the way the light hits the flowers and leaves of all three and the Epimedium (gorgeous). I've noticed in my garden that the mid-Spring light has been really good this year, lighting my plants like yours above. Maybe it's like this every year and I've not noticed before...

    The sword-shaped leaves would work weaving through other plants with different foliage, so maybe look for a few bolder foliage plants to add to the border? Do remember that it's still early in the year though, and they will fill out more, no doubt by the end of May.

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    1. I know exactly what you mean about the light Julieanne - we don't often get so much of it up here in April. Usually cloudy with rain!
      I hope you are right about the plants filling out, it's what I was aiming for but hadn't taken into account how it would look at this time. What I also need to remember is that many of the plants are small and have yet to fill their allotted space too. Hope you are feeling better today :)

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  5. So many roses - and each with an interesting name.

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    1. Roses do have interesting names don't they Lucy - I should delve in to that some time, would make a great post.

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  6. I enjoyed your EOMV Angie. It's a wonderful time of year with things changing daily or hourly sometimes or so it seems. I thought about you last night when I hurtled in from greenhouse to house with my salvia 'Amistad' cuttings which are making good growth now. How did your cuttings fare?

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    1. Thanks Anna. My cuttings and cuttings from cuttings are coming along. I think I now have about 14 plants. Glad yours have succeeded too. I was looking at the plants for sale in the GC last week and they look far superior to my cuttings. I am trying hard not to let it worry me, as those will have been in poly tunnels etc.

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  7. I knew I'd seen that epimedium on your blog, Ellen Wilmott has wonderful foliage and those gorgeous deep orange blooms. Your front garden is certainly starting to fill out now, it will look fabulous when the irises flower.. did I spot a bloom or two coming on there?

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    1. Isn't Ellen a beuaty Jessica. I am so glad I listened to the advice from Billy at the nursery. He said it was a better one that Amber Queen. Those blooms are lovely, albeit quiet sparse here. How well did yours bloom? Yes, a couple of Iris buds. Cherry Garden, which did flower round the back unlike all the others!

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  8. Dear Angie, your front yard looks fabulous right now! It is fascinating to me how much its look has changed from March to April despite your turbulent weather.
    I actually have to disagree with you in a sense that I don't thing you have too much strappy foliage plant growing there right now. To me it looks quite balanced.
    My favorite plant in your post is the geum 'Dingle Apricot'. What an adorable plant!
    I think you have chosen a fantastic collection of roses for your front yard. When they all bloom it will look quite wonderful and I can't wait to see pictures of them.
    Wishing you a nice weekend,
    Christina

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    1. It has changed quite a bit Christina and I hope looks wonderfully full and lush in the near future. That is a pretty wee Geum, something just a bit different too. Which is always nice.
      I had a feeling you'd appreciate the Roses. They flowered rather sparsely last year and not all that the same time. I'm exciting about seeing them altogther this year.

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  9. It's lovely to see all your plants exploding into growth, Angie! I have to smile about the spiky/sword-shaped foliage, as it doesn't bother me a bit. In fact, I did the same thing in my earlier garden for the simple reason that I love so many plants in the bulb/rhizome families - and they grew well there. And now here I'm having a bit of trouble growing them... I need more spikes...! That Euphorbia "Fireglow" is wonderful, and I can only imagine how good it will look a bit later on with the Cotinus!

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    1. I am glad everything is now in explosive mode Amy, it's been a long winter here. I am obviously drawn to plants with spiky foliage, since I have so many. I hope you manage to source more spikes that do well with you. It would be a shame if you had to do without.

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  10. Oh, what a beautiful Geum, Angie. I fall in love with them in the last year and baught something new. Do you know Mai Tai? Your frontgarden is looking beautiful.

    Sigrun

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    1. Yes, Mai Tai is a popular one Sigrun. Still quite expensive though. I saw it for sale recently at £10 a pot. It is a lovely one, maybe I might add it to my garden one day.

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  11. Your garden is so green and well organized, Angie. I love combination of flowers and stones.

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    1. Thank you Nadezda, the stones were a necessity to stop the cats pooping in the bare soil but I rather like them there too.

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  12. Angie we have had similar weather during April, your plants are a lot further along than here though, your garden is looking quite lush with all the sprouting foliage, and I see lots of contrast, I especially like the photo of the iris leaves against the darker leaf plant next to it, nice that your privet hedge is coming on, mine could probably do with a good feed too, Frances

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    1. I am so please that the privet has enjoyed the feed. I am going to go with your previous suggestion of renovating it with a hard prune if I can't get it to improve by feeding. It will be a real pain if I have to but needs just might!

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  13. I have seen Epimedium x warleyense Ellen Willmott on other blogs, I must look out for it to join the Epimedium I have
    in our shady corner at the rear of the house.
    Your roses will make a wonderful display during the summer.

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    1. I was recommended that particular Epimedium Brian and not disappointed with it as I am sure you won't be either if you are able to find it.

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  14. I moved some irises from the garden to yto plot. They rarely flowered in the garden but love it in the plot surrounded by weeds!!!

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    1. Good idea to move them to the plot if they do well there Sue.

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  15. Lovely to see how your garden is coming along Angie. I could identify with a lot of what you said. I too struggle with irises and move them around hoping they will do better. Mine, too, have good foliage this year - sometimes it all gets eaten, so lets hope we get some flowers. The iris bulbs I have, on the other hand do really well. Glad you are enjoying the Euphorbium Fireglow. I have had it for quite a few years and it has spread wonderfully. I tried moving it around the garden this year and it seems to have taken - I am trying it is some difficult places to see whether it will work. Let me know if you want any more of it, though yours will spread too. I love your little Geum - if we ever do another plant swap please add that to the list if you have enough. Glad to see the yellow Potentilla flowering. Mine are just out too. The blue Primula you gave me is just out and looking lovely. Looking forward to seeing your front garden in another month.

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    1. We can will each other's Iris to bloom Annette :)
      I do hope the Euphorbia spreads, I saw a massive clump of it on the drive up to Binny's this afternoon and it looked stunning. I'll sort out some of that Geum for you. It's a pretty robust wee thing and you won't be disappointed with it.

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  16. I find I plant too many plants with sword like foliage as I love irise and other bulbs too, but there are so many things you can contrast them with such as geraniums, hosted, ferns, geums. The front garden is looking fab

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    1. I had hoped there were plenty plants with contrasting foliage Helen but it appears not. I don't know if it's just because everything is still very small and if it will improve as the year goes on. I'm not going to start moving things quite yet - I'll give them a chance.

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  17. I'n sorry to hear that you've had a difficult spate of winter-ish weather but your garden looks gloriously spring-y. I love that fiery Euphorbia, the Geum (which don't want to grow here), the Erysimum and the Epimedium.

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    1. Glad you like the Euphorbia, it's a beauty isn't it Kris.

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  18. I love Irises and it is a joy to see these little ones coming into bloom. Cherry Garden is always the first out in my garden and it spreads more than any of them. Lovely to see you have Ellen Willmott' s Epimedium. I have become fascinated by her story and it is great to see plants with her name.
    That is a pretty Erysimum and I love your Geum. I love the way you put so much thought into your plant combinations.

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    1. I remembered your post about Ellen Willmott Chloris and reading her fascinating story. There are many plants with her name, a nice tribute to her.

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  19. I know that feeling of everything being in bud, just about to burst into flower. Your garden looks great even so, especially the Geum and Wallflower. I love your arch. As for hybrid tulips, I also find that frequently they are not reliably perennial when it comes to flowering. Species tulips and Darwin hybrids are better on that score. The Berberis foliage is great - are you sure you give higher marks to the Epimedium?

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    1. I wondered how long it would take before someone mentioned my choice of best foliage Jason :) It was a close run thing and I think I chose the Epimedium because it's new and it's the first time I've really appreciated it that plus the foliage stays all winter where as the Berberis is naked for such a long time. Either way, both I suppose are lovely.

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  20. What a delightful arch, Angie! We inherited some rather old decking when we moved in ... with some rather battered trellis, but the foliage it attracts is great for wildlife.

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    1. The trellising in my back garden is constantly in use by the wildlife Caroline - I love how the wee wren flits about feeding into the crevices for beasties. I have a huge deck but as yet have no budget, which would be large, to remove it and replace with something more practical. One day!

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  21. actually think I want to start a garden this year so this is a great tip for me. We don’t do enough to reduce, reuse, and recycle, but we try our best. Great post!! very informative. Thank you very much for such a lovely and informative post.

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    1. Good luck with starting your garden this year Calvin. If I can be of any help, just ask :)

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  22. Oh, I have seen Euphorbia griffithii ‘Fireglow’ and I really want one! Your front garden looks great and is starting to fill in – those 7 roses will look absolutely gorgeous when they all are in flower :-) And I love your Berberis Bagatelle, must have one! Enjoy the spring, hope you get some really nice weather soon!

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    1. I can only imagine that your new garden will make a huge dent in your wish list Helene and so far I can thoroughly recommend Fireglow, it's gorgeous. Mind you if you read Alistair's comments below - it may not be such a beautiful plant in a few years time :)

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  23. Cotinus really struggled in Aberdeen Angie, I used to over winter a standard one in the greenhouse, seemed to do the trick. We had Euphorbia griffithii Fireglow, it really is a great looking plant, I am going to find a spot in our our Cheshire garden for this one. I will plant it where I am not concerned about it spreading, look out for the runners (it runs wild).

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    1. I remember your standard Cotinus Alistair and yes, can imagine that in the greenhouse it would come into leaf quicker. I will bear in mind your comment re the Euphoribia and keep a close eye!

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  24. actually think I want to start a garden this year so this is a great tip for me. We don’t do enough to reduce, reuse, and recycle, but we try our best.

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  25. Great blog, it's great to see colour, growth, and plans coming together over time. Lets hope May warms up soon. I had to give up on Cotinus in my last garden, they lots more growth from frost every year than they ever put on, shame, as I love them.

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  26. Wow Angie, you are certainly packing a lot of plants into your garden! It’s looking great too. That little Geum Dingle Apricot caught my eye and I've just done a ‘Binny Plants’ search and see they have it there so I've added it to my list for my birthday visit using the voucher my daughter gave me for my birthday – thanks for sharing that one :-)

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  27. Love the yellows Angie, with the little Potentilla and the Geum and I am definitely taken with the Euphorbia griffithii 'Fireglow' I have seen then before for sale but it is much better to actually see how they look in your garden. With Epimediums you are very much talking to the converted, they are one of my favourites, so easy as long as you remember to chop down the old foliage before the new becomes too advanced or it becomes a job for a pair of scissors and a lot of concentration :-)

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  28. I had to give up on Cotinus in my last garden, they lots more growth from frost every year than they ever put on, shame, as I love them.

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