Thursday, 2 April 2015

We all make silly mistakes, don't we?

A pretty little display of Chionodoxa nose their way out from beneath a stepping stone.  A stepping stone I hastily placed plonked in the border to help me negotiate my way through the border in winter and to aid me with the spring clear up.



In theory, it should have worked just fine.  In practice, well see for yourself!


A bit more caution required in future me thinks!

Are you in the habit of making silly mistakes?  Care to share?

34 comments:

  1. Your Chionodoxa will resurrect now that the stone has been rolled away. I make silly mistakes on a daily basis. Late last summer I put a large ceramic pot in a bed in a spot that needed a bit of something. This spring, I've been wondering where my dicentra is. Hmmm.

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    1. Yes, I've a Dicentra that has suffered the exact same fete Peter, fortunately I remembered quite early and it's now picking itself up! I'm sure yours will too.

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  2. I have always thought stepping stones are a good idea in a border to prevent me putting my size nines on emerging plants. I have never got round to placing them, Now what do I do? As for silly mistakes, how long have you got?

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    1. Learn from my mistakes Brian and make sure you know there are no bubls underneath. Mind you it's quite amazing that the bulbs just have a need to grow and will search out light regardless of such a heavy weight on top of them.

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  3. Yep I bought five new hostas and every time I jammed the shovel into the ground to plant them I saw another hosta just waitng to come up. Uh Oh sorry little hosta I'll move on. And over and over again it happened,I guess I didn't really need five new hostas after all.

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    1. I did the Hosta thing only the other day! It's too easy isn't it! I'm sure they will do ok, they are tough blighters.

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  4. I expanded my borders without creating any way to safely walk in and out while working on them. I tiptoe between plants, compacting the soil as I go...

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    1. Ah, I see I am not alone then Kris. I should have placed the stones before I moved the plants around and I might have missed these bulbs and a couple of others elsewhere. I'm sure you'll get round to it at some point. At least you don't have the wet mud to navigate through.

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  5. I've made that exact mistake, but I wasn't satisfied to stop there.

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    1. You tease us with a wee snippet Rickii - come on what did you do ;)

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  6. Hi Angie,

    I don't think you're on your own at all. Although I have managed to avoid covering anything with stepping stones, I have done things such as moving plants and taking bulbs with them by accident. I guess I can't complain as it's meant there's now bulb interest elsewhere... However perhaps when I dug up some hellebores and planted them in pots, it might've been best if the Anemones that came with them were kept in the border. Unsurprisingly said border seems a little sparse on anemones this year.

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    1. That exactly how the bulbs make their way around my garden Liz - it have single crocus popping up everywhere and spend an afternoon lifting them all and replaning in a good sized clump.
      I'm sure an Anemone shopping spree would solve your problem. Good old B&Q :)

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  7. The mistake I've made most often is slicing into spring bulbs while planting perennials. Hope your Chionodoxa survives.

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    1. Oh that old chestnut Alison! Yes, we've all done that haven't we.

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  8. Ha ha, normal. Yesterday I found a hosta in a smal border, I had forgotten it. And placed at her side an other one. Now I have to chance my mistake.

    Sigrun

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    1. I think the fact that Hostas are quite late at sprouting it's a very common mistake Sigrun. I'm sure you'll rectify it and find an alternative spot.

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  9. Oh dear, poor little things they are not looking their best. Still, let,' s hope they will recover. I' m always doing this sort of thing. Specially with treasures like Corydalis which disappear completely. I think I have a nice empty space to plant something and then whoops!

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    1. Yes, I make those mistakes too Chloris. I'm finding that's the exact reason I now have Corydalis growing in spots I hadn't planted them, rather than them seeding around.

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    1. At least you are honest about it Sue ;)

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  11. Good thing you snapped a nice pic before the mishap ;-) While looking for dead leaves, I cut off an anthurium bloom yesterday... fortunately just one hehe...

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    1. Not always a good idea Stephanie :)

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  12. I have lost count how many bulbs I have pierced with a garden fork, or worse still sliced in half with a spade. Also many of my tulip leaves have emerged rather crumpled because I didn't see them and trod on them.

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  13. Sat here pondering over which of my numerous silly mistakes to tell you about. Methinks Myra will get more pleasure in doing so if you have a spare morning sometime.

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  14. Definitely, too many to share, the Chionodoxa will recover and at least you know where they are now. Usually hoeing the top of some precious plant I know is there and in trying to avoid it I hoe it's top off anyway! Have a good Easter weekend :)

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  15. Haha, I make too many silly mistakes. Yesterday I hoed some new shoots of my Delphinium in the garden, grrr.
    Wish you Happy Easterdays!

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  16. How many silly mistakes? How long have you got?!
    I make mistakes all the time, but that’s how I have become a reasonably experienced gardener –well, that’s what I tell myself anyway! My memory is not as good as it should, I heavily rely on my online garden record to know what I have where. But it can only be trusted if I update it every time I have planted or taken something out. So I have pen and paper in my pocket every time I go out in the garden to make notes so I can later change my record on the computer. That is if I can remember where I put the piece of paper. A couple of weeks ago I could not find the paper I knew I had written on when out in the garden, I thought it was in my pocket when going inside but no, not there. Three days later when I dug up some more plants in the same area I found the note pad, quite deep in the soil. It had probably fallen out of my pocket. Planting a Post-it note pad was a new thing for me, maybe it could grow into something beautiful??

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  17. Like all the others, I have many. I just about avoided one this afternoon. I have a spot where I left some annual self seed last summer and autumn. I was about to turn the soil when I remember this spot was not to be disturbed. In my old garden I had Perilla frutescens purple coming up on its own. I hope to get it to settle here.

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  18. Such is life...! I refuse to get too conscientous about such things; after all, I usually find it's better to correct something on the fly than not to start it at all, which is my normal alternative... with results according! And chiondoxas are tough little fellas and will put themselves anywhere in the garden - planted or not :)

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  19. Ciao Angie! Non preoccuparti che sono cose che capitano a tutti penso, no? Poi sono piante così robuste che si riprenderanno subito e l'anno prossimo saranno già disseminate ovunque :D

    Un saluto :)

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  20. Ah I now understand the comment you left on my EOMV post Angie and will take special heed. Thank you :)

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  21. I probably make hundreds more silly mistakes than I realise, being such a rookie. Ask me again in a year's time! On a different note, thank you for the stepping stone idea. Now WHY didn't I think of that before?

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  22. Eek! They will recover though. I have some epimediums to plant out, and had earmarked the perfect spot, but when I was weeding it in preparation I saw a little shoot, and remembered just in time that I have an actaea there... Your stepping stones are a good idea though, I never get round to it because I always want to cram in more plants, which is fine until you can't get in to the border to weed or plant with trampling on something!

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  23. You haven't got a page long enough to list mine :-)

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