Thursday, 9 April 2015

Tree Following April 2015 - Sorbus Autumn Spire

I'm a tad behind in posting my Tree Following post this month.  My body clock is all to pot - I've been on a training course at work, relegated to mid shift and a classroom!  Being stuck indoors, wasting precious gardening time does not sit well with me, especially as the weather has been sublime.

We are now into April and my wee tree doesn't look much different than it has done in previous posts. Talk about a watched pot!  It seems just as equally true for a tree - does a watched tree ever leaf?
Sorbus Autumn Spire
Round about everything else is coming on leaps and bounds.  To the left, Viburnum sargentii Onondanga and the gorgeously scented Philadelphus Belle Etoile to the right are well out of dormancy.  At the base, the Snowdrops and Eranthis I planted at the tail end of February are still green but will be pretty soon hidden by the surrounding perennials that are now on their way.
Primula denticulata Alba will be the first to flower.  Followed later by Trollius cultorum Cheddar, Ligularia The Rocket and Astilbe Deutschland.  There should also be Darmera pelatata off to the left but it doesn't appear to have returned this year.   Bittercress seedlings were sprouting up everywhere, the whole area has had a good hoe and hopefully I will be able to keep on top of them.  


  
Buds at the very top of the tree are just breaking.  All those at eye level are still quite tight.


Sorbus Autumn Spire buds bursting

By comparing it to other trees in the garden, there's not much in it.  The Hawthorn and another Rowan are a bit further on.  Even the Acers, which generally leaf out reasonably early here are still in bud.  Both the Birches (which are new) are tight in bud.  The twig that is Betula Crimson Frost worries me a bit, it hasn't even broken a bud yet.  It is so thin and fragile, I am apprehensive about carrying out a scrape of the bark to see what is happening beneath.

The tree I am choosing to follow this year, was new to my garden almost 1 year ago.  Just a week or so short of it's first anniversary.  It had very few flowers last year, in fact, just a couple of clusters.  It will be interesting to see just how much blossom it produces this year.
Sparrow and Greenfinch at feeder

The blossom will in turn, lead to lovely yellow berries for the birds later in the year but meantime they are still making full use of the feeder.  Just as I popped back out with the camera, I managed to get a snap of the greenfinch taking his fill.  The sparrow patiently waiting his turn.  This tiny feeder is well used, even the robin is now managing to take from it.  Only when he breaks from his mating ritual though, he's going all out this year.  Such a fascinating dancing act he puts on to impress his lady friends.  It's just a pity I can't manage to catch him on camera.

      

34 comments:

  1. Ciao Angie! Come stai? Ormai lo sai che da quando me l'hai presentata mi sono innamorato di questa pianta! Forse sono riuscito a trovarla qui in zona, speriamo :D

    Un saluto e un buon venerdi!

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    1. All good here Pontos - hope all is well with you too. Yes, you are rather fond of it, happy hunting. You must let me know if you get it.

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  2. It's lovely to see the Sorbus doing well and coming into leaf :)

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  3. What a treat that this tree gives yellow berries....I also am following a young tree this year.

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    1. I find birds prefer the yellow berries here Donna - red berries rarely get stripped from any of the berry bearing shrubs.

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  4. Great shot of the birds on the feeder from the fence--so cute! I know what you mean about a "watched tree." That's how I felt about my Shagbark Hickory about this time last year. Of course, they eventually burst forth with new growth. I'm glad you're having a lovely spring!

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    1. A lucky shot Beth! It's been a long time coming into leaf. Mind you, we are lucky here weatherwise. Unlike you lot over the pond.

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  5. Trees do take their time. My bet is the Sorbus goes to town within the next couple of weeks! I hope the robin snags a mate - you'll have to keep us updated on that too.

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    1. I'll keep you updated with Mr Robin's courting - I haven't seen him today, maybe he's busy ;)

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  6. Those top buds look like all is well :) Your shrubs are lovely with the new growth, and your shot of the birds is great...!

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    1. Thanks Amy - hopefully by next week, there should be more action.

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  7. Tree following is a bit like watching a pot boil this time of year, this warm period of weather will hopefully bring every thing on. How frustrating having to be in a class room during this sunny period.

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    1. I am hoping so Brian. Heard a comment on the radio this afternoon that we are experiencing far better weather here than they are on the continent. Out of the class room now, thank goodness!

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  8. Trees and shrubs are all behind schedule this year but things are growing now after a lovely week.

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    1. Aren't they Sue. I've a few shrubs that have not even got buds yet!

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  9. An interesting tree! Hopefully it will be greening by this time next month.

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  10. Spring is really kicking in now and the winter blues are lifting. My birds are not as discriminating as your Angie, they take the berries no matter which colour!

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    1. Tell your birds that there are plenty red berries here for them Rick :)

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  11. It's all a bit behind in comparison to last year, but the last few days buds are bursting and green shoots are popping up. The shot of the greenfinch is super on the feeder.

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    1. You are right Janneke - a bit behind but I suspect in a few weeks, we won't be able to tell the difference.

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  12. The Darmera peltata is always late to show up. Not there in my garden too.
    Happy Weekend Angie

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    1. Thanks for the advice re the Darmera Marijke, I'll not give up hope yet then.

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  13. Watched trees don' t do anything very much or if they do, they take their time about it. How lovely to have a greenfinch, I haven' t seen one for years.

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    1. I've read that Greenfinch population is way down, something to do with a parasitic disease. The pair visiting here seem to be somewhat regular lately, hopefully they'll continue to visit.

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  14. Your Sorbus is off to a good start this year. I'm jealous of your Philadelphus, I have one but it is the variety without scent.

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    1. You really need to get yourself one with scent Jason, they are hard to beat.

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  15. Hi Angie,

    My two small Sorbus aren't in leaf yet either, and I'm unsure whether I think it's unusual or almost on cue...

    How are other trees in your area? We've Hawthorn and others leafing up now - my autumn cherry has leaves. So I hope the sorbus aren't far behind!

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    1. Yes, the hawthorn etc are all leafing up now, even now 1 week on those buds are still closed. I noticed the path along the river is taking up a bit of a green hue, lined with Rowans, at least they are now getting going.

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  16. A lovely post, Angie - and thank you for your kind comment on my tree(s)! I think most of us have been waiting ... and waiting for the business of real spring growth this year. I have a hunch we will soon be plunged into summer, though! The leaves here are suddenly unfurling fast. I love your feeder and the way the birds can almost sit in it!

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    1. I think you are right Caroline, the plants will take a plunge right into summer. That feeder has been used constantly since I first put it out full of suet, now I refill with sunflower hearts.

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  17. It looks as if you will not have to wait too long for leaf opening Angie although the anticipation is exciting too. I hope that your body clock is back to normal soon. Himself works twelve hour shifts so I've witnessed the effects shift work has on the body clock.

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    1. Yes, a sudden change can mean your body clock is all too pot and thankfully I'm over it now but the whole week I was in a trance despite the fact my shift change only covered 2 days!

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