Wednesday, 15 April 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day April 2015

I began my gardening journey 4 years ago this month and it really pleases me that some of those first shrubs I ever planted in the garden are now making a reasonable size and make the garden feel a bit more mature.  I've always been very conscience of showing entire areas of my garden mainly because many of the shrubs were dwarfed by the perennials.

One such area is just to the front of the trellising I added to the garden at the beginning of 2014. Just about to come into it's own Camellia x williamsii Jury's Yellow is full to bursting with buds. There is a tale attached to the shrub.  I purchased it back in 2008 as a moving in gift for the garden.  I found it a temporary home in the ground until the builders were gone.  Sadly, run off from the cement mixer managed to find it's way into the spot where it was planted and the plant really began to suffer. At one point I thought it was dead!  I nurtured it for the next 4 year until I was sure it had fully recovered.  It's been in this spot now since 2013 and you can see for yourself that it's now none the worse for wear.   Hellebores, Narcissus Tete a Tete and a few self seeded Fritillaria meleagris (no pheasants here!) bloom together.  The gold leafed Cordyalis (C. Berry Exciting) is also just coming into bloom but they are very sparse at the moment.  More of this pretty thing in a later post I suspect.  You can also just make out a wee cluster of Leucojum aestivum  popping out to the left of the Camellia.  I haven't the foggiest what the bulbs are to the rear apart from the fact that they appear to be daffs. Looking back on my records contenders are N. Thalia or N. Tresambles - we shall see.
Camellia x williamsii Jury's Yellow
Nearby, off to the left, this small clump of Narcissus Mount Hood bloom happily in the edge of the border that catches the sun.  I was given 6 bulbs by my local nursery owner back in autumn, well who can refuse plants for free? - not me that's for sure!  I was rather skeptical about it's ID after seeing them on Chloris's recent post over at The Blooming Garden.  A bit more research, it appears that they do in fact open yellow and fade to white.  Phew!  These are generally much larger that any other daffodil I grow and I am not a fan of those huge in your face yellow blooms.  I was actually considering lifting them and giving them away but now that they are fading, they are much more pleasing to me.   They were supposed to be paired with some white Muscari but they appear to have come up blind.
The varying shades of Narcissus Mount Hood

Further round the same bed, Hostas are only just poking their noses from beneath the soil - no sign yet of the Kirengeshoma and Polygonatum.  Blooms are provided by way of a Bergenia and the purple leafed Corydalis.  To the back of the Bergenia, the Heuchera Binoche has been rather late in getting a tidy this year due to the cold weather.  They are intended to show each other off but just not this year!
Bergenia Overture
Corydalis flexuosa Purple Leaf (aka Blue Dragon)

Across the way on the sunnier side, both Muscari armeniacum Peppermint and Lady Blue mingle with the ever gorgeous Corydalis solida First Kiss.

Muscaria armeniacum Peppermint

Muscari armeniacum Lady Blue
Before we pop through the arch to the back garden proper, Dicentra cucullaria Pink Punk is just beginning to bloom in a terracotta pot that has been it's home for the past 3 years.  I think it's time to find it a home in one of the borders.


Just to the otherside of the trellising, I am pleased with how this corner looks right now, tucked in between the Heptacodium and Cornus: Primula, Fritillaria, Narcissus and Chionodoxa are blooming amongst fresh Aconitum and Aquilegia foliage.   A pot of Narcissus Jack Snipe had been looking for a home, I think they have made a lovely addition to this spot.

Primula vulgaris, Fritillaria meleagris, Narcissus cyclamineus Jack Sprite and Chionodoxa forbesii
When I filled this area out last year, I tried to pay particular attention to how and when the plants would bloom and at this point last year, the Dicentra spectabalis and Aquilegia were a mere 6 inches above the ground and had not hindered the view to all these spring pretties but this year, it's quite a different matter and you don't see them unless you get right up close and personal.  Zooming out, you can see exactly what I mean.  I won't start fidgeting around with the planting this year but will keep a close eye on behaviour next year.
Heptacodium corner

Getting the remainder of the Hellebores down on record this post.  They may have been late in getting started but they've more than made up for it now.   Checking back on last year confirms that they had all gone over by April.
Helleborus x orientalis Hybrids

April is always drumstick Primula time, they are, it seems unaffected by conditions and flower in April regardless.  Flanked by P. dentinculata Cashmeriana and Alba, is a plant that was sent to me last year by a follow blogger.  An unnamed purple variety, very nice and a big thank you Annette. I look forward to increasing what I have and spreading it around the garden.


Yet more of the same Primula on the top tier at the very back of the garden, I like these colours together, they need a bit of tweaking to get the grouping just right.  The Narcissus are N. Pueblo, scented and another new one to the garden this year.  The gargantuan Cardoon on the lower level is going great guns.  It will pretty soon do a good job of hiding all the foliage of all the early bloomers up there.

Primula denticulata, Narcissus Pueble and Helleborus orientalis hybrid
There are many more Primula dotted around the garden in bloom right now.  The Autumn shades Primula veris was a novely buy last year and I wasn't sure if they'd reappear.  The yellow Primula veris doesn't do well here and rarely returns for a second year.
Primula: Wanda, veris (autumn shades), Drumcliff, Don Keefe, bracteossa, unnamed single and unnamed double white
The Erythroniums I planted back in February are now flowering their wee socks of, it makes me wonder why it's taken me so long to grow these beauties.  I am still researching what to grow when they grow over and have marked the centre of the planting spot with a cane so I don't disturb the bulbs when I go digging.  What do others grow with their Erythronium to bloom later in the year? Right now I am thinking Hosta or another type of Lily.  I think I am too late to buy bulbs for planting and will probably need to wait to see what I can buy later in the year.

Erythronium Pagoda
Nearby, a new Epimedium this year is Epimedium Pink Elf, is just settling in and has thrown up it's first blooms.  This Epimedium is reported to be a variety that will flower again later in the year - August/September time apparently.
Epimedium Pink Elf
The obligatory shade loving blooms at this time of the year.  If you don't already grow Pulmonaria, give it a go, the bees love it at this time of the year.   Many gardeners report that Pulmonarias self seed around their garden yet I find them very well behaved and have never found a seedling.  Having therefore to rely upon dividing them to spread them around the garden and give them away to friends.

Pulmonaria unnamed varieties and Brunnera Jack Frost
Before we pop back through the arch, Camellia japonica Elegans is acting rather coy but you can get the gist of the colourful blooms.  Two clumps of Narcissus Thalia, my favourite are also blooming.
Camellia japonica Elegans and Narcissus Thalia

Narcissus Thalia
Popping down to the side garden things again are very slow.  No leaves on the Acers yet. Narcissus Jet Fire and Brunnera Hadspen's Cream are providing floral interest.  A self seeded Aquilegia seems to have made itself at home too.  If you are looking for a daffodil that does well in a fair amount of shade, then N. Jet Fire is one I can recommend.

Narcissus Jet Fire and Brunnera Hadspen Cream

I'll totter past the Magnolia, it is just about to come into bloom but the sun is glaring and it's difficult to get a good shot right now.  The espaliered Camellia has produced the most amount of blooms it ever has in the 4 years it's been in the garden.  Proof I think that it now has it's roots firmly down.

Camellia japonica Desire
Rounding up this month's post should be a few images of what's blooming in the front garden but the sun again is hampering getting some decent shots.  Not that there is a lot mind you.  Narcissus minnow and Fritillaria uva-vulpis are resembling head bangers at a Metallica gig in the wind. 

If you don't already do so, I know most of us do, why don't you join me and other garden bloggers who link their Bloom Day Posts on the 15th of each month over at May Dream Gardens.  Everyone's welcome.  See you there!

49 comments:

  1. I do like Erythronium Pagoda, do the slugs eat yours? Narcissus Thalia is an elegant flower and the espaliered Camellia is a great idea, she is very 'Desirable'.

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    1. Ah, slugs! Yes, they are considered a particular pest of the Erythronium and I noticed only today Brian that there has been a few nibbles, so the answer is yes, they obviously do!
      I love N. Thalia and you are right, she is elegant. I'm very pleased with how the Camellia is working out.

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  2. So much to look at! And it's only April - congratulations! Well done too for rescuing the Camellia. The Dicentra cucullaria is beautiful. I shall be adding it to my wish list, along with some drumstick Primula - I miss them here. This has been a bit of an expensive read for me!

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    1. Oh dear, hope it doesn't cost you too much Sarah :) Drumstick Primula are something every garden should have I think.

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  3. Very pretty!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. Thank you Lea and same to you :)

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  4. So many different beautiful plants in your garden, I love your variety of Primulas. I'm jealous on one plant, the Corydalis flexuosa. I tried it twice but disappeared both times after 1 or 2 years.

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    1. Thank you Janneke. The corydalis seem to do ok here, I think my soil conditions must be ok for them.

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  5. Angie, you have done so much in just 4 years, and I feel like I have done so little in the same amount of time. Your garden is so lush, and mine seems so barren. So discouraging. Congratulations on all your hard work!

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    1. Thank you. I'm sure your garden will come together. I may have rushed in a bit too quickly and feel as if only now I am finding out what I really like and what really thrives. It's been a learning curve, that's for sure.

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  6. You have good taste in plants! Lots of interesting blooms and foliage in your garden.

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    1. Nice of you to say Marian, thank you :)

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  7. Your Erythroniums look so healthy and robust compared to my solitary pink specimen. I shall have to try Pagoda.

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    1. Don't forget, these are quite new to the garden - heaven knows what they will look like next year Jessica.

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  8. What a wealth of bloom! I like your Camelia very much. I am pleased to report that here too we are finally having spring. Temperatures were about 20 C these last two days and the first bulbs are coming up.

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    1. Glad to read that you are now experiencing spring Alain, it's been along time coming, eh?

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  9. Wow, spring isn't shy in your garden, Angie. You have a bounty of blooms! I bought a Camellia 'Jury's Yellow' when the yellow(ish) forms were first introduced here - I can't believe I left it behind in my old garden but perhaps it's for the best as the Camellias are struggling here. I love Epimedium and Erythornium but, sadly, they won't grow here either.

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    1. I remembered you commented on the Camellia in your old garden last year Kris, yes a shame to leave it but as you say, probably for the best.

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  10. Happy GBBD! I'm stunned to hear that you've only been gardening there for 4 years. You've accomplished so much. I have a couple of Erythroniums in my garden, but I haven't overplanted them with anything. I need to work on that corner of the garden, it's all pretty much spring ephemerals, and when they die back, it's a very boring corner.

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    1. That the exact reason that I want something to take over from the Erythroniums Alison. Now that I am getting to grips with the plants, I need to focus on the succession of them.

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  11. So many exuberant blooms! Your garden looks amazing, especially for being so young. Happy GBBD!

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    1. Thank you Peter. We tend to have good soil here in Scotland and I think that helps the plants no end and proven by the fact that the plants grow well. Right plant, right place is one rule I do follow.

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  12. Gprgeous flowers, Angie! I'm thrilled by the dicentra, such pretty foliage. What is the plant with the fern-like foliage in fornt of the daffs in the first pic? Hard to believe you're still a young chicken in the garden scene as your garden certainly shows you've a good hand for plants and combining them.

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    1. Thank you Annette. The plant you are asking about is Polemonium yezoense Purple Rain. It has lovely foliage and worth growing if you can.

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  13. You have some really beautiful flowers, Angie. I have never come across a yellow camellia.i really like the white daffodils, I planted quite a few in my blue and white border but all except one or two have disappeared

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    1. Such a shame re the white daffs. I wonder has something eaten them?

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  14. Oh what a great journey you have been on over those four years Angie and you should be more than pleased with your progress! You have obviously put much thought, love and hard work into your planting. 'Jury's Yellow' is such a soft subtle shade. I'm ashamed to admit that I killed mine :(

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    1. A pity you lost your Jury's Yellow Anna - how did you manage to kill it? Mind you, you wouldn't be the first gardener to kill something. I know I've committed my fair share of horticide!

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  15. Hi Angie,

    Seeing your small, ferny bleeding heart reminded me I need to look to see if mine is emerging yet... It's called 'king of hearts'. And I've needed to move it for a few years now and hope I haven't lost it this year!

    Lovely photos, and I think your garden is extremely nice. I have zero planning or design skills so I generally plonk mine together and hope it looks nice. Perhaps not, but the flowers are pretty.

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    1. Liz - I also have King of Hearts and it's just about to come into flower, I hope it has returned for you. I've had little planning or designing going on either but only just now am I realising many of my mistakes and hopefully rather than continually filling out spots with new plants, I can now spread them around and get the garden to gel together, if you know what I mean.

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  16. It is amazing what you have achieved in 4 years. I have Jury' s Yellow too, I think it is stunning. I googled Mount Hood after your comment and was surprised to see how yellow they look on some photos. Mine are white from the start. How strange. I love those two Muscari which are new to me. Your Erythroniums are superb and I love Epimedium ' Pink Elf'.

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    1. Odd, how differently they behave Chloris isn't it? I found those Muscari at one of my local nurseries where you can always guarantee to find something just a little different.

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  17. Your description of finding white and yellow Mt Hood is the same as my experience with it years ago... I'm not sure I ever quite got over the shock of seeing so much yellow on it each spring ;-) It's a beautiful, very classic daff, all the same! Your camellias are just lovely; I might try some here eventually - especially if continually tempted by pictures like these ;-) I'm sure they wouldn't much like the soil, but they're supposed to be able to stand the climate so perhaps growing in pots would do the trick. I'm just wondering whether some of the smaller ferns might be a good choice around the Erythroniums? I really shouldn't weigh in at all, as I never successfully grew ferns, even in a moister climate - always wanted too though! Japanese anemones might be an option as well?

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    1. Yes, that yellow kind of shocked me Amy. I don't like big yellow daffs and I immediately thought to get rid. They are all white now, so much more pleasing to the eye and they've had a reprieve!
      Funny you should mention Japanese anemones as an option.....I did actually buy one to do just that and then found it another spot in the garden. I'll come across something eventually I hope!

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  18. Your garden looks beautiful - and again another nice Corydalis I want to have! We have a lot of similar plants in our gardens, but you have not the same names for it! Wish you a wonderful weekend!

    Sigrun

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    1. I've noticed that we have similar taste in plants Sigrun - great minds, eh:)

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  19. Angie your garden is now so colurful full of cheer.Like your Mount Hood Daffie.

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    1. Cheers Kath - glad you like :)

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  20. So many blooms - your garden is a joy to visit Angie. I'll be interested to see if Epimedium Pink Elf does indeed flower again. It looks very pretty and double-flowering, what a bonus.

    I agree with you - N. Jetfire is wonderful for shade.

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    1. I'll keep you informed re the Epimedium Julieanne - I hope it does too.

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  21. What a treat to watch blooms in your vernal garden, Angie. Especially lovely is Erythronium Pagoda, I'd like to grow this one in my garden too.

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  22. Angie, your garden is choc a bloc with Spring goodies. Just reminded me on how much I miss the erythroniums in the garden. Your Camellia Jury's Yellow isn't half looking good in spite of its earlier peril, yellow, now that is a great change from the usual pink and reds. Have a great gardening year ahead. Alistair

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  23. I can see we both like bleeding heart and daffodils. What you have that I lack: Camelia, Primula, Erythronium. Also, you have mature clumps of Hellebores while mine are still in the awkward gangly stage. Your garden really glows with spring colors!

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  24. Angie, I was going to say what a variety of plants, and how well they are doing in only 4 years. But on second thoughts, for people like us, totally bitten by the gardening bug, it's not really so surprising it's growing so well.

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  25. Angie, I was going to say what a variety of plants, and how well they are doing in only 4 years. But on second thoughts, for people like us, totally bitten by the gardening bug, it's not really so surprising it's growing so well.

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  27. I am still laughing at the image of 'Minnow' as headbangers at a Metallica gig!!
    Lots of gorgeous blooms - a real feast for the eyes! I must plant Thalia in the autumn as they are so elegant. Things were very slow here, but a good sunny week has hastened lots of things. Your perennials look very well grown, Angie.Well done nurturing your camellia back from the brink - it has repaid your trouble !

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  28. A beautiful collection of spring plants, you garden sings with colour. I've been trying to take photos of everything in bloom but the sun is so strong, not that I'm complaining about the weather, it's brilliant and especially having the time to be out in the garden enjoying it. I too have epimedium 'Pink Elf' and it will be interesting to see what it does.

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  29. Four years well spent. I don't think I have accomplished as much in ten.

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