Sunday, 8 March 2015

Tree Following March 2015 - Sorbus Autumn Spire

Buds March 2015
My rowan tree, Sorbus Autumn Spire, is showing the minutest signs that spring is advancing. The tiniest of speck of green is proof that those leaves are about to burst.  If you look closely at the bud on the right you can just make it out.  The remaining buds on the tree are still tightly closed. I may have been a tad hasty in hoping that those buds would have burst by now.  Joining in with Lucy's Tree Following meme will go a long way in educating me in the tree's cycle of life.  Although I am only posting about one particular tree, I am observing others and taking notes.  Not something I've ever done before.  The wee coconut feeder continues to be well used by the smaller birds.  I had trialed a small suet feeder here too but I worried about the detrimental effect 30+ starlings would have on my fragile wee tree.  It's probably tougher than I think but i am not willing to take that chance.    
Sorbus Autumn Spire


At the beginning of the year, I envisaged snowdrop naturalising around the base. I've been busying myself lately by lifting and dividing a few of the more mature clumps of Galanthus nivalis. There has been plenty to go around.  This small grouping should fill out over the next few years.  It always amazes me just how little G. nivalis flinch when lifted from the ground in their prime.  I think technically you are supposed to wait until the flowers are about to go over but I generally tend to seize the moment as and when and have never found it hinders them the following year.

I am trialing some Eranthis in this spot.  I mentioned in my previous post that this area can be prone to the occasional water logging.  Everything I try here is experimental for the first year or so.  Over the years I've had failures and as my experience and knowledge grows I am having more positive results. The snowdrops will fair just fine, they cope with the same conditions further down the border. It will be a long wait until next year to see how the Eranthis do.  Nothing ventured, nothing gained, right?

Galanthus nivalis, Eranthis cilicica and Primula denticulata Alba
Primula denticulata Alba are one of the successful plants I've trialed here.  Growing here for 3 years now, they are now spreading themselves along the stone edge of the border.  Trollius, Ligularia and Astilble that provide early and late summer blooms are as yet showing no signs of new growth.  In the gap to the left, last year's experiment, Darmera peltata, is not showing either.  The soil is probably not warm enough quite yet.  I was given a piece of this by a friend a couple of years back, I grew it on in a pot until it was bigger.  Last spring was it's first in the ground and I look forward to those huge architectural leaves adding a bit of impact this year.

Over the years it has been difficult choosing plants that thrive in this spot.  Conditions here vary, depending on rain fall.  They cover both ends of the scale.  Moisture can be excessive or the ground is very hard and dry.  Since it's easier to introduce moisture than it is to take it away (without prohibitive costs that is) I opt for plants that cope with the water rather than those that don't.  The excessive rainfall of 2012 saw this area under water for almost the whole summer.  The Philadelphus, Persicaria (growing nearby) and Primula are all the remain post 2012.

I am hopeful there will be more to report next month and just in case you missed the link at the top of the post, please join me and other garden bloggers who on the 7th (or thereabouts) of each month link their post to Loose and Leafy's Tree Following meme.  See you there!

 

21 comments:

  1. You are almost watching the buds outof your Sorbus Autumn Spire, after winter we are all so impatient to see new growth, it will come, sooner than we think.
    Lots to do now in the garden, wish you happy gardening!

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    1. Same to you Janneke - spring has just about sprung!

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  2. The excitement of early spring :) Actually, I love those weeks when the very early bulbs can come out into full sunshine under the still-leafless trees so am enjoying seeing your snowdrops and all under the rowan. I'm sure the drifts will be wonderful as they spread!

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    1. The garden is full of anticipation at this time of the year isn't it Amy.

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  3. Mi piace quello che dici della Primula denticulata! Ora che so che sopravvive più di due anni proverò a coltivarla anche io :) Grazie del consiglio :D

    Un saluto :)

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    1. They are reliably perennial here Ponto and as I said, multiply well too. I look forward to seeing them in your garden.

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  4. Lovely to see those buds!
    I've got bulbs and other plants that need to be moved around too.

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  5. Wonderful post. The buds look beautiful!

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  6. From my records we are running a good two weeks behind compared to last year, they say spring can start as late as April, the last few days of sun has brught things on realy fast, so it should not be to long for your little tree.
    Amanda xx

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  7. Hi Angie,

    Good luck with your little Sorbus; I do hope it's full of leaves this time next month!
    I haven't checked my small Sorbus' yet, but I don't think either are budding yet (my Acer continues to open its leaves though!)

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  8. I'm so tempted to get a Sorbus this year. In the limited time I've had in the garden this month I've been moving snowdrops too. It's great to do it when they are in flower and create an impact in the new spot from day 1.

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  9. Signs of spring, definitely. I love to see those swelling buds--on any tree! Can't wait to see an update on your Sorbus next month!

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  10. The tree that I am following is showing even less activity,

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  11. It is indeed a great Sorbus to have in your garden and should cope with the varying soil conditions. One of the secrets of successful gardening is finding what works with the conditions you have, we can tweek Mother nature a wee bit but never completely, I found this in my last very exposed windy garden. It's a learning curve :)

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  12. Oh, a little sorbus! I wish you, that it grows well. We have to big one, the must go the next autum, to bigh for your garden. Not enaugh space for big trees.

    Sigrun

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  13. Your little tree will soon be a real feature in your garden, I will look forward to seeing your photos through the year. I'm so glad you are going with the flow in your damp border and planting plants that will enjoy living there. I really love my bog garden here with its lovely colourful flowers.

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  14. Thank you for your kind comments. I love Rowans, which always remind me of Scottish holidays. Thank you, Angie, for your kind comments. What a lot we are all learning from our TF (ad)ventures! I was getting a bit despondent at how little there seemed to report here ... and then all of a sudden, things seemed to happen, though I hope the Sparrowhawk will find its food elsewhere once we get to the egg and fledgling season!

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  15. I always enjoy seeing the first buds appear on dormant trees. I think the snowdrops surrounding your Sorbus will be wonderful.

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  16. Watching a tree is a lot like watching a pot that never seems to boil, until you turn your back for a moment and it boils all over the stove. Tree-watching is more fun though.

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  17. Once they start opening, there'll be no stopping it! All will be green again, before we know it! :)

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  18. How exciting to see the buds swelling. By next month many of us tree followers should have the satisfaction of seeing these lovely buds opening.

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