Sunday, 15 March 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day March 2015

What a treat I had for Mother's Day - a chilly afternoon spent digging some manure into the area around the front hedge.  It isn't the best of specimens and I have opted for taking the easy route of adding nutrition rather than a hard prune to rejuvenate it.  If feeding the soil doesn't work, the loppers and saws will be out in force next spring!  There is now a wonderful whiff in the air each time you open the front door.  Why am I the only one that appreciates it?

Temperatures here are still hovering around 4 or 5°C during the day and the garden is reflective of this.  While the garden appears to be stuck in limbo, comparing what I have in bloom today and what was flowering in Marches past it seems to be pretty much the same.  My mind is playing tricks on me.

Looking at their best right now - the oriental hybrid Hellebores add a bit of interest in various spots around the garden.  They all came into the garden via a tray of plugs I purchased 4 years ago.  All are now a good size and make a real difference at this time of the year.





Helleborus orientalis, Narcissus Tete a Tete and Galanthus nivalis


The only daffs flowering right now are Narcissus Tete a Tete.  The clump above in the shot with the Hellebores are new to the garden this week, they make a lovely addition between the snowdrops and hellebores I think.

Over on the sunnier side, paired with some Crocus vernus Jeanne d'arc, they cheer up a border where there is nothing else going on.  The bloom time of the larger dutch crocus generally signifies the start of the spring rains - in years gone by they are normally a crumpled heap by now!  It's been a change to see those stark white blooms upright for so long. 

Narcissus Tete a Tete and Crocus vernus Jeanne d'arc
A brief glimpse of the sun midweek brought out the best of the remaining Crocus chrysanthus blooms.  This grouping is a classic example of 'wrong place' - this spot was originally the front of a border but with the trellising going up last year, it makes their placing look rather odd.  New spots for them have been identified, some have already been moved, the remainder will be moved at some point over the next week.
Euonymus fortunei Emerald Gaiety and Crocus chrysanthus

Crocus chrysanthus and drone fly (Eristalis tenax) 
My earlier disappointment with Crocus sieberi Spring Beauty waned as the sun broke through the clouds.  The deep purple veining on the outside of the petals looks almost black when the blooms fully open.  I wonder if they over heard me saying that I'd need to move them elsewhere and find an alternative.
Crocus sieberi Spring Beauty
Down in the side garden, my espalier grown Camellia is the first to flower this year.  The delicately coloured pink blooms are tinged along the outer edge with a deeper shade are almost ready to burst open.  This solitary bloom has been out for a couple of weeks now.  The rest should be out in a week or so.
Camellia japonica Desire
This reliable little Primula blooms all around the garden sun or shade, its does well in all aspects.  It always blooms a week or two before P. vulgaris.  Seen here paired with yet another clump of N. Tete a Tete in the little bed outside the back door.
N. Tete a Tete and an unnamed Primula 
Corydalis are a favourite group of plants of mine.  They do well here and I am finding they are now spreading themselves around a little bit.  Which I hope means that they are happy.  They, of course, disappear in summer and tend to be forgotten about until just the right time in winter when the ferny foliage appears.  This pretty duo C. solida Beth Evans and C. malkensis get up close and personal beneath one of the Cornus.  Like the Primula will do well in either shade or sun here.



Corydalis solida Beth Evans and Corydalis malkensis
in the shadier side of the garden
The last bloom I want to share with you this month is currently blooming it's little heart out in the miniature garden - Saxifraga burseriana Gloria.  It always amazes me that something so little can produce so many blooms.  These lime crusted alpines would just not cope with the soil conditions in my garden, therefore I get the best out of them in a container where I can control the drainage.  Collapsed in a heap is the gorgeous Crocus biflorus Blue Pearl I shared with you all on Wordless Wednesday.  They have in years past flowered at the same time but not this year.   
          
Saxifraga burseriana Gloria
A big thank you for reading and please let me invite you over to May Dream Gardens where garden bloggers the world over will be sharing what's blooming in their garden this week.   I'm off now to see what's blooming in your garden.

58 comments:

  1. Beautiful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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  2. Your Hellebores are lovely, and the flowers are so welcome at this time of year. The Saxifrage is fabulous!

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    1. They are aren't they Alison and these ones are looking their best right now.

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  3. Crocus Spring Beauty is a delight, I love the dark purple on the backs of the petals. Do you find your Corydalis seed around?
    I love your Saxifrage, what a little gem.
    Despite your cold weather you have plenty of lovely blooms to enjoy.

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    1. Thanks Chloris. I am not entirely sure if the Corydalis are seeding around, I suspect it's more of a case of me moving those tiny bulbs around with other plants. They are now growing in places I know I did not plant them.

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  4. Your Camellia is beautiful.

    Native Corydalis just comes up here, with no help from me. It's here and then it's gone until next year. Love it. A tiny patch of Violets appeared in what was a tulip bed last year. I took it as a Mother's Day sign.

    Your Hellebores are lovely, something I admire in the gardens of others but do not grow here.

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    1. How lovely to have a tiny patch of Violets appear where you didn't expect them. Indeed, a Mother's Day sign. Hellebores are worth finding a wee spot for Jean but if they don't do well with you then it's probably not so practical.

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  5. Ah, I envy you those beautiful crocus!

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    1. We often envy other what we can't grow don't we?

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  6. Your crocuses are stunning and the hellebores are beautiful too, but I think the camellia is my favorite. I'll need to try to incorporate some of these into my Texas garden next year (if they are compatible with the location) so that I have more lovely blooms to look at this time of year.

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    1. Will they cope with your conditions Rebecca? They require lots of water in the summer when they are forming flower buds. Something we don't have a problem with!

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  7. Your hellebores are beautiful. You are a few weeks ahead of us here in upstate New York - we still have a bit of snowcover. I find gardens like yours evidence that spring will be here - eventually. Happy GBBD.

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    1. Yes, I think we are a few weeks ahead but I've no doubt your garden will catch up and over taken soon enough Alana :0)

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  8. Fabulous camellia, it's really unusual.

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    1. Thanks Jessica - I can't be held responsible for the Camellias I grow. They are mum's choice, she loves them.

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  9. I SO love those Crocus! They don't do well here - usually blooming only 1 or 2 years - and I keep saying I won't plant any more but I do love to look at them (and am easily suckered into buying more). Corydalis is the same, sadly. Happy GBBD and I hope you get a warm-up soon, Angie!

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    1. I can see why the Corydalis would toil with you Kris, it would not like those drought conditions one little bit. It will be nice when we finally get a bit of heat out of the sun.

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  10. It makes my heart sing to see all those beautiful Hellebores blooming! My garden can't be far behind. :) And Crocuses, too! Camellias, not so much, because my climate is too cold. But, wow--that peach-colored Camellia ... be still, my heart!

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    1. Beth, I take it the winter is the problem with you growing Camellias. From memory I think Camellia williamsii are the hardiest, might be worth trying to source one of those and seeing how it fairs. It won't be long until your garden comes alive with spring.

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  11. I have never thought of growing a Camellia as an espalier, it is a good idea and looks lovely along with all your other spring flowers, Angie.

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    1. I hadn't either Brian but it was bought as a climber and since I had no where else suitable, I thought I'd give it a go in the side garden, which is very narrow and it was my only option. It's still small and we shall see how it goes over the next few years.

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    2. Do you prune it after flowering like an espalier apple tree back to two buds?

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    3. I am unfamiliar with the method used in Apple Tree pruning but with the Camellia so far it's just been a case of tying in the stems to the wires as and when they reach them Brian. I have spaced the wires 6 inches apart so as not to have too much fence showing. To be honest, I have no idea if I am doing it correctly or not but am looking forward to learning more as the years go by.
      I did a post about it previously - you can read it here.
      http://mygardenblogs.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/attempting-espalier.html

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  12. That Saxifraga burseriana Gloria is doing very well for you, I love the vibrant colours of Crocus sieberi Spring Beauty and of Crocus chrysanthus.

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    1. Thanks Alain. These Saxifraga would cope well with your lime conditions would they not?

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  13. Some lovely flowers growing a camellia as an espalier is a good idea I've never seen it done before

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    1. The Camellia is a work in progress Sue - still small but alive and looking none the worse for it.

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  14. Loving your March blooms Angie, especially the Hellebores. I like the dark colours but always feel the pale ones stand out better.

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    1. I wholly agree Alistair, they do stand out better and they seem to cope a bit better with the wind I find.

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  15. Ciao Angie! Non sapevo avessi così tanti ellebori! Complimenti! Vedo che tu le foglie vecchie le togli, pensavo di farlo anche io! Il Corydalis è bellissim, qui i miei non si vedono ancora!!

    Un saluto e buona settimana :)

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    1. I think removing the leaves lets the flowers do their thing and you can see them better. Although it is advised only to do that with the Oriental hybrids. I've learned my lesson the hard way!

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  16. It's all looking wonderful, Angie! You're right - those Crocuses are fantastic. It's exciting that they came through after all :) I can't imagine being able to buy plugs of Hellebores; they were never that common where I gardened before and are unlikely to survive at all here, but I think they look great scattered around your bed like that! And that is such a happy combination of Tete-a-Tete and the primulas...

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    1. Thanks Amy. I've never seen those plugs again Amy, I suspect that they were not popular due to the fact that they took a couple of years to bloom.

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  17. Gorgeous blooms Angie.. very pretty :o)

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  18. I know what you mean about the limbo season of March here in Edinburgh. It feels as though spring will never come, and my tulips that were coming through the earth a week or two ago seem almost to have gone back down below! I especially liked your corydalis - so subtle and simple. I must add these to my list.

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    1. We seem to be at an impasse Joanne! The Corydalis are lovely wee things but don't last long at all. Mind you in this cold and damp, they should last longer than they have in the past.

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  19. I have an image of you out there with your shovel, moving things around. This is the season for it, before we get all wrapped up in other projects.

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    1. Don't forget the wellingtons Rickii - they had to be washed outdoors since they were rather smelly!

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  20. Never heard of growing a Camellia as espalier, but it's a great idea if you have little space. Your springflowers are wonderful, love the Corydalis and the Saxifraga Gloria which I have not in my garden and are very pretty.

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    1. Yes, Janneke - I am killing two birds with one stone so to speak. Little room and large expanse of fence!

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  21. Now was that manure your Mother's Day present Angie - you don't say :) Your hellebores are clumping up well. I've added a couple more crocuses to my wish list after seeing your fine display.

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    1. As it turns out Anna - kind of :) My son gave me GC vouchers and it was part of the haul! I much prefer practical gifts.
      I will be looking forward to seeing which Crocus you choose.

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  22. It's wonderful to have some hints of spring, isn't it? I too have some moving around to do in the next week or two. Beautiful pictures!

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    1. It sure is Linnae - good luck with getting those plants moved. I hope the weather is kind to you.

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  23. Love all your little crocus, especially C.sieberi Spring Beauty with its dark feathering. Your Hellebores have grown well from small plants, spring has certainly arrived in your garden!

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    1. I so glad those Crocus are doing well now. 3 weeks ago they were for the out Pauline!

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  24. What a treat! Everything so fresh and beautiful, spring is definately a season to be relished.

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  25. Your crocus crysanthus are a lovely shade of purple - beautiful. I see you also have Jeanne D'Arc doing well. I have a pot full this year which has been beautiful, but I will probably add them to some I already have in the garden when they are finished. That is a wonderful Camellia flower - I wonder if I could squash one in somewhere?

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    1. Thanks Annette. Jeanne D'Arc don't normally do so well here as I said above, the wind and rain usually has them flattened within two days of blooming but this year all is well.
      Maybe keeping a Camellia in a pot might be an option if you have little space.

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  26. A lovely collection of flowers. That Saxifrage is very impressive :)

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  27. So many gorgeous winter blooms! Spring is certainly near! What a wonderful mothers' day. To a gardener, few fragrances are sweeter than freshly spread manure. Perhaps you could create and market a perfume...

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  28. Your pictures give a true impression of spring Angie, I am particularly taken with your Saxifraga burseriana Gloria.

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  29. Your post reminds me that I need to snip off the old Hellebore foliage in the back garden tomorrow. Wonderful spring blooms, I hope to catch up before too long!

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  30. Spring Beauty is just that, don't you think? Your display crocus and daffs is most tempting, I really need to remember to plant more spring blubs.

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  31. I had to resort to buying bulbs in bloom this year as I was so desperate for some spring colour. Everything is so slow this year. Your spring blooms are wonderful.

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