Sunday, 8 February 2015

Tree Following February 2015 - Sorbus Autumn Spire

As I strolled up the garden to get a couple of shots for this month's I'm Following a Tree post, I knew that there would be little to report.  My wee Rowan Tree looks exactly as it did last month.  

It will be March before there is any signs of growth, despite the fact that the buds look promising, the sap has not risen to fatten them up yet.  I'm willing to bet most of us will be in a similar situation this February.  Last month was the first time I took part in this meme, maybe this month would have been a better time to start joining in.   Still, it's done now, I can't change that, can I?   
       
Sorbus Autumn Spire - February 2015



Had the ground not been so regularly frozen, I'd have risked moving some snowdrops into the bare earth underneath.  There's also a pot of Eranthis waiting to go in too.  The snowdrops should cope with the occasional waterlogging (they do so elsewhere in the garden) but the Eranthis will be a bit of a gamble. 


Tubby the resident back garden Robin came down to see what I was up to.  He's used to me putting out his treats at this time of the day. Not this time Tubby!  You'll need to wait a while until I put the camera way.  


Thinking about how little there would be to write about this February it dawned on me that perhaps some birds would make my post a bit more interesting.  A rummage around in the shed for something small enough to hang, the empty coconut shell would do the job I'm sure.     

Feeder with sunflower hearts

Filled with sunflower hearts, it was light enough to do no damage to those branches twigs.  It didn't take long and within seconds, true to form, the wee blue tits were first to investigate.


   



It took a while before a lone Great Tit got in on the act.  He ventured back and forth between the trellis and the feeder for quite some time.  Savouring every morsel he got, no doubt.  By the end of the day, more of his friends were visiting to.     


  

Tubby, of course, isn't able to perch upon the shell, he has to sit patiently waiting his turn to forage on the ground for the spoils.

   

Thankfully, the squabbling starlings are not interested in this feeder, I'm not sure my wee tree would appreciate the gang of 30+ ascending upon it.  

Thanks for reading and thanks to Lucy for hosting.  There's a link at the top of the post should you like to pop over.

30 comments:

  1. I did not remember those delicious red buds being so prominent in your last tree following post Angie but have just has a quick look and see that there is a photo featuring one. Well a bit of tree decoration is always a good idea at this time of year especially if it's bird friendly :)

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    1. Anna, the birds probably would have appreciated the feeder weeks ago. It's used all day long now, still only the GT and BT the coal tits haven't ventured there yet. A bit of decoration especially if it gives it another purpose is always useful.:)

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  2. Sweet. What a great idea for a bird feeder! I love this meme, and hope to join in soon. :)

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    1. Coconut shells are popular as feeders here Beth. You buy them like this or halved and are filled with suet, it's been useful to reuse this one.
      Look forward to your tree post.

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  3. Great idea for a bird feeder. Nice pictures of the Great Tit, also. We call Sorbus Mountain Ash. Does yours have orange berries?

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    1. The name Rowan is more popular over here but it does get called Mountain Ash too Jason. Im not sure if you caught my first post about this tree but I gave a brief account of the folklore that accompanies this tree. It has bright yellow berries, very pretty and of course one for the birds.

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  4. I loved seeing your Sorbus Autumn Spire, Angie, along with Tubby and his friends. We were re-watching 'The Secret Garden' dvd last night: I just love the way that robins endear themselves to those who have an eye for things wild! Thank you so much for your kind comments on my Silver Birch. It isn't particularly elegant of itself, and we were advised to get it a 'haircut' two years ago, but it brings me so much pleasure and is a whole eco-system within itself!

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    1. Thanks Caroline. I could spend all day watching the birds, unfortunately not conducive to running a home! A neighbour had a large silver birch cut down, rather badly, a few years ago - I got the benefit of it in mygarden. I've recently planted a white stemmed birch at the very back of the garden for which I have high hopes and hope it becomes a whole eco system like yours. Thanks for visiting.

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  5. What beautiful birds! And the tree, too. Very nice pictures, and the red buds on the tree are so pretty. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks Anna - the tree was new last year and as I bought it just as it was coming into leaf, I had no idea it had such lovely buds.

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  6. Well, you livened up your post! Great photos. I don't think it was a mistake to start your following exercise in January - many people plant new trees and the twig-phase is always a concern so seeing how your tree progresses will undoubtedly be helpful and reassuring. And I'm pleased to have an introduction to Tubby the Robin.

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    1. Kris, Tubby has 2 frenemies ;) One called Skinny and the other Stripe - I know not which is male or which is female but they are becoming a bit more tolerant of each other this last week or so. They are obviously gearing up for breeding season.

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  7. I started my following this month and as you sat nothing much is happening yet especially as our trees are both babies. Those birds adopted the new feeder quickly as often they take a bit if time before they feel comfortable with new things

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    1. I find the Blue tits take to anything new feeder wise almost immediately Sue, the other birds take a bit longer but generally get there in the end. I'm just so pleased the starlings are leaving it alone!

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  8. A great idea to hang a bird feeder on your tree while you wait for those nice plump buds to open. It doesn't t take the birds long to find it. Lovely tits and nice to meet Tubby.
    Some nice snowdrops would be just the thing to plant underneath.

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    1. I think the snowdrops will make a lovely addition Chloris, even better if the Eranthis survives. There are some large clumps needing splitting so I can spread them around a bit up here.

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  9. I stand in awe of people who can get such great bird photos. When I move (soon I hope) I am definitelygetting a bird feeder.

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  10. What a fun way to liven up your tree post, and great pictures of your little friends! I love newly planted trees, I would have a whole lot more they grow so fast and I have so much trouble commiting to a spot.
    To be on the safe side I've sown some sorbus seed this winter. I suspect I will have plenty if time to think about placement :)

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  11. Hi Angie,

    Haha, I imagine you might be waiting until April or May for the first leaves on your tree, but it depends on the species I guess... I'd like to follow a tree, maybe in the future. I often follow one of my Acers, especially in spring as its leaves change colour so dramatically as they unfurl and then mature over summer.

    Have you tried the 'globe' feeders - they stop the Starlings - so will give the other birds a chance to feed. The only time I ever get Starlings are when the juveniles are around, they visit for a week or so, then never come back. It's very odd, I don't understand why they avoid the garden (but I know they nest in surrounding gutters and hear them calling every day). Although I can't say I'm upset, as they are nuisances, but at the same time I don't discriminate against any of the birds - we have feral pigeons as well as collared doves and wood pigeons. Even Magpies and Jays are welcome.

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  12. It has been chilly, so I guess the tree is thinking it will hold out a bit before really bursting forth. Still, I can see the buds, so it's getting ready.

    I love your Tubby and the other bird photos. I know Robins are supposed to be ground feeders, but I have one that goes into my hanging seed feeder with it's squirrel proof cage all the time. Maybe it thinks it's a blue tit!

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  13. I love your feeder (nice recycling) and those fat red buds are so full of promises.

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  14. I always love seeing the British robin, ours are so different. I see you have a coconut feeder too, we have 3 in the garden and the birds love them. I fill one of mine with homemade suet and it attracts all sorts of birds.

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  15. Those red buds do look fantastic - it seems they will burst open at any moment. And what charming visitors! They look well fed... We have few interesting birds here where I live in winter. Most of the colorful ones migrate south. I can't wait to hear some cheery birdsong again!

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  16. Adding a bird feeder was a wonderful way to enliven the scene :) I meant to start tree-watching the first of the year and am now two months behind, so I admire your prompitude, Angie! And there are tiny buds on it :)

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  17. So Angie is this a tree post or bird post? I know my tree will not change rapidly it is all part of the observation to me, your tree is working hard on the inside, be patient, Frances

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  18. Angie what a great idea to share your tree with some birds...love the feeder.

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  19. Good thinking Angie, you instantly extended the interest with your bird feeder ! I have wussed out this month as my fig tree is absolutely unchanged and I couldn't think of a word to write which would have any value ! usually my fig tree has experienced some trauma or disaster so the posts usually write themselves !!
    Lots of buds on your little tree - I bet there is much exciting stuff to write about next month!

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  20. Well Angie, perhaps Autumn spire hasn't changed much in the past four weeks but I love the use you have found for it. last Winter we planted a Rowan named Wisley gold, apparently the berries are yellow, similar to Joseph rock, hoping it has berries this year. It became reasonably sturdy in its first year, but it seems to be a form that is very late in coming into leaf, in fact, it was just about into May before the leaves developed.

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  21. È una pianta spettacolare! Questo autunno e inverno l'ho cercata molto ma pare non esistere da queste parti... Magari la ordinerò in internet :)

    Un saluto!

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  22. I'm glad you started when you did - waiting is part of the watching. As is observing creatures which gather around your tree and you seem to have expanded their population as part of Tree Following too. (I hope those tits don't take an interest in the beautiful red buds. That would be embarrassing.)

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