Thursday, 29 January 2015

Just a dusting.

With January coming to an end, we finally had some winter weather.  Winter is just not winter without a light dusting of snow at least.  I know we rarely have it as bad as some but it's always nice to see the wintery effect it brings to the garden.

Clumps of Galanthus nivalis are dotted around the garden at varying stages of growth, who can fail to love Snowdrops in the Snow?
Galanthus nivalis in the snow
More G. nivalis in the snow
Not quite ready to flower yet, Galanthus Jaquenetta under the witch hazel should have 2 flowers this year - it's all good!
Galanthus Jaquenetta
I was pleased that I managed to get the new Eranthis in the ground at the beginning of the week. They look far better in the ground than out and those yellow blooms are like beacons - I can see them from the house.



 Crocus are standing tall whilst the snow melts round about them.  Aren't they brave wee soldiers?  
Crocus chrysanthus

Crocus chrysanthus Romance
In the side garden, the Cyclamen coum had only just got started and has been flattened by the weight of the snow.  I'm sure it will pick itself up again.  Cyclamen coum doesn't like my garden as much as C. hederifolium does,  this is all that is left from 3 good sized pots planted a few years back.

Cyclamen coum
Bowing under pressure - Helleborus x ericsmithii Pirouette began to pick up as it thawed out once the sun hit it.

Helleborus x ericsmithii Pirouette

Remnants of the earlier snow fall, the ice acts as a bit of bling around the cones of the Abies koreana Silberlocke.

Abies koreana Silberlocke
In a pot outside the back door the monochromatic effect of the snow dusting Ophiopogon nigrescens looks rather dramatic.  The shoots of Iris reticulata Harmony are just beginning to poke their noses up into the light.
Ophiopogon nigrescens
Out in the front garden, a bud from Rosa Jude the Obscure, wears a little white cap courtesy of the snow.

Rosa Jude the Obscure
To round of such a lovely day - I spotted Woodrow the Woodpecker in a tree over the back.  Poised with the camera to capture a few shots, I spotted something quite different hopping around on the snow covered lawn.  A new species to visit the garden, this Pied Wagtail hung around for a long time helping itself to what ever it could find.  I hope it's not just a one off visit.  Woodrow never did appear however!

Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba)

29 comments:

  1. Isn't it wonderful to watch the bright colour of the Eranthis? And perhaps with the snowy weather yours will stay fresh longer. In the Midwest, mine regularly bloomed much later than this and then were gone within a few days. These look promising - as do the rest of your gallant, snowy flowers :)

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    1. I'm hoping so Amy, I am quite unfamiliar with them as I've never grown them before. I will be keeping an eye on them.

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  2. That's a dusting? Snow is basically a foreign concept for me so that looks like a heavy snowfall to me. It's wonderful to see the flowers standing proudly about the snow.

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    1. Believe me Kris, in comparison, this is just a dusting. The snow of course adds moisture and minerals to the soil, making it all good!

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  3. Snow here too today Angie accompanied by a rather windy fanfare. Crocus chrysanthus 'Romance' has a most attractive soft glow about her. Here I noticed some flashes of blue against the snow which turned out to be irises just about to open. It's always so exciting to see glimpses of colour in mid winter :)

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    1. I work outdoors all night Anna and was out in those blizzards - it's fun to work in horizontal snow!
      Romance does have a soft glow, a nice buttery yellow. How lovely to have your Iris out so early. Mines are miles away yet.

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  4. I have been watching the weather and you have been getting so much snow, we might get a sprinkling on Sunday!
    The flowers do look lovely piercing the snow, especially your crocus. Stay warm, cosy and safe!

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    1. Snow makes the environment look ever so lovely, it's always nice to get a bit. Hope you aren't over come with it down there Pauline.

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  5. How fun to see the early spring blooming plants with a dusting of snow. For some reason, that rarely happens here. Our early spring doesn't happen until March, and by the time things start blooming, the snow is usually all melted. Thanks for sharing these lovelies!

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    1. It's amazing at just how different our Springs work isn't it Beth. On saying that, we don't regularly have spring bulbs blooming when we have snow.

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  6. Jude the Obscure looks happy in the snow along with the Pied Wagtail.

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    1. Yes it does Brian. I bought this rose back in the summer and believe it or not, this is the only flower I've had from it. It had been cut back when I brought it home.

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  7. We just had a dusting too. For some reason pied wagtails seem to frequent school playgrounds. Messy children dropping snack crumbs.

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    1. Now I know what they are, I recognised them from the car park at our local Tesco and B&Q Stores Sue.

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  8. snow does make the garden look pretty, I hope it doesn't make getting around difficult, I always think how delicate these early flowers look yet they seem very robust, Frances

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    1. These plants have to be fighters don't they Frances. Thankfully the snow isn't too bad that it's hampering getting around.

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  9. Your photos are pretty Angie and reminded me April here when I see the same pictures of crocuses and snowdrops. When will spring come in my garden? Pied wagtails are often guests here too when snow melts.

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    1. I'm sure April won't be too long in coming around Nadezda - the upside of seeing them in my garden now is that you get to enjoy them twice :)

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  10. That's about what the snow looks like here, but we don't have the wonderful late winter blooms that you have. Lovely photos!

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  11. Always amazes me how plants manage to survive under the snow, but they do. Better than being exposed to frost and icy winds I suppose. I don't think C. coum is up here yet, I will go and check tomorrow.

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  12. Nice all these brave early little flowers in the snow. Especially the Eranthis drew my attention, I don't have them in the garden because they won't grow in my acid soil. Hope your new ones are stayers.

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  13. Angie your winter garden looks like mine in late March as the snow starts to melt and the early bulbs emerge...so lovely to see it now.

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  14. Lovely to see all the spring flowers against the snow :-)
    I wish people down here could agree that that’s ‘a light dusting of snow’ too! They close schools, roads and airports for something like that. Madness. I saw a reporter on BBC the other day, talking about the ‘masses of snow’ that had come down so far that day, almost 4 inches!! Oh my, I call 4 inches a dusting of snow.

    I can’t get cyclamen coum to thrive in my garden either, I have planted 6 corms every year the last 3 years and even though some has come up, they don’t really look much, and most have only lasted the first year for never to been seen again. I wonder if they perhaps don’t like my acid soil. Or maybe they want more sun? Perhaps I should give them one more go and buy ready plants this time, instead of corms.

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  15. Lovely to see your bulbs coming up through the snow. The French name: 'Perce- neige' is a good name for snowdrops isn' t it? We have snow too, although not a lot, and I am afraid I don't accept it as graciously as you do. I want to get on out there and catch up with all the neglected jobs. You have Abies koreana, what a great choice, I love the cones sitting like candles on the branches.

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  16. So beautiful all your early flowers in the snow! You are a bot more early than in my garden in the middle of Germany! In Scotland it is not so cold in winter than in my region.

    Sigrun

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  17. It's great how a dusting of snow enhances the Spring flowering plants and bulbs, they are obviously made for one another.

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  18. Snowdrops, crocus, hellebores, and cyclamen blooms -- how they warm my heart, Angie, at this time of the year. Here everything is blanketed with snow and I can't expect to see shoots for 2-3 months more. Beautiful posting. P. x

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  19. The cones of Abies koreana Silberlocke are wonderful, so plump!

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  20. Lovely photos - I really liked the one of the rosa. I did go to the garden centre last week and yes they did have some Eranthis. They also had some Hebes on their bargain bench that I have my eye on for the top of the front garden. It was freezing cold though so I ended up coming home without buying and am planning to go back on a slightly better day. Doesn't look as if it is going to warm up any day soon though.

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