Tuesday, 4 November 2014

To pot or not to pot?

I'm in need of a wee bit guidance - can you help?


rooted Salvia cuttings November 2014
I took some cuttings of my gorgeous Salvia Amistad back in mid October, as was suggested by a few of you when I raised my concern re getting it through winter.  I rooted some in water and also the more conventional way in compost.  The ones in water rooted rather quickly (50% success rate) and were potted up into individual pots 2 weeks ago.  Those that have successfully rooted in the compost took a bit longer but are now showing signs that they have rooted.  Tiny roots are now appearing from the holes in the base of the pot.

This is where I get stuck!  Do they need individual pots now or will they happily survive in the same pot for winter?  - and - At what point to I nip them out to make them bushier?

These are my first attempts at taking cuttings so am quite excited that I've had some success.  Any advice greatly appreciate.  Thanks.

Salvia Amistad and Small Tortoiseshell Butterfly



22 comments:

  1. Ciao!! Io mi sento in colpa perché non ho fatto le talee quindi spero che la pianta madre passi l'inverno :) io aspetterei che i nuovi germogli raggiungano i cinque centimetri e poi la separerei in vasetti diversi, le salvie radicano bene e non avrai problemi :) buona fortuna e speriamo in un inverno tranquillo :D

    Un saluto :D

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    1. I do hope you have a mild winter and your plant survives Pontos. You will need to be prepared next year.

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  2. I'd say it was time to separate the cuttings into their own little pots so they have room to grow. By the way, that's a gorgeous shot of the butterfly on the salvia :) Elizabeth

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    1. Glad you like the shot Elizabeth, I do too. I was just in the right place at the right time.
      Thanks for taking the time to respond to my cry for help. It's much appreciated :)

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  3. I was pondering over exactly the same dilemma yesterday Angie!!! My salvia cuttings are possibly even bigger. I did not imagine that September/October would be as warm and that they would make so much growth. I trimmed some of the lower leaves off when I took the cuttings but they are now looking rather crowded. With the weather set to turn colder I've decided against repotting now as I think that the cuttings would struggle to root down in new compost before the winter. It's a hard card to call but I think that there will not be enough warmth now. Congratulations on your first ever cuttings - isn't it magic? :) I am keeping my fingers crossed that this comment appears. Commented twice on your EOMV post a couple of days ago and twice earlier on this post but although the status changes to published nothing appears. Now trying using a different browser.

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    1. To be honest Anna neither did I and I hadn't expected the cuttings to survive. Judging by the comments from yourself and those below, I think the safest thing to do it to for now is to leave them be. It has been really cold this last coupe of days and I suspect we shall have no more warm days no.
      I tried to respond to your email last night on my phone but for some reason, my phone would not send. Blasted devices and software!!! I hope you've got to the root of your problem.

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  4. I would hold off potting them up until Spring. It's turning cold (finally!!!) and they should stop growing anyway. From past experience I have found that potting them on now was too much of a shock and risks killing them. They can handle being a little crowded until Spring.

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    1. Your opinion seems to confirm what others are saying Julieanne. It's at time like this my inexperience shows and to be honest glad I asked now. I had been very tempted to pot them on but last minute doubts set in.

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  5. I don’t have much experience with salvia cuttings, but I often take cuttings very late in the autumn and I always leave them together in the pot until early spring. When the cuttings start to put on new growth in the spring I know it’s time to carefully break them apart.

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    1. Thanks Helene - this is what I love about blogging, advice is only a click away :)
      Roll on spring!

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  6. Gosh, I am so not an expert with potted plants--except, surprisingly, one tiny Cyclamen plant that continues to amaze me. My Lemon tree is still alive, but I think it's happier inside than outside. So, anyway, good luck! And I'll look forward to reading about your results!

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    1. I do hope I have success to write about Beth. Watch this space.

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  7. Congratulations! Always a bit magical getting cuttings to root. I'd go with Anna and suggest you leave them until spring now, its what I do, with seedlings too.

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    1. I think because it's my first time I don't want to fail Janet. I had read online somewhere that they would need a heated propagator this time of the year and when I weighed up the cost of such, I would have been far better of just buying new plants in spring.
      Thanks for taking the time to give your opinion, it truly is appreciated.

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  8. If the weather is sunny and warm I'd pot salvia in different small pot, Angie.

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    1. I think we've seen the last of the sunny weather here Nadeza, therefore will follow the leave them until spring opinion but thanks for taking the time to advise. It's much appreciated.

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  9. I am not sure I can completely help you with your problem, but by shear coincidence I have just updated minutes ago my own post about Salvia 'Black and Blue'. This is an herbaceous salvia and my post addresses the problem of late rooted herbaceous salvia cuttings!
    The link is at the bottom of my current post.

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    1. Thanks for pointing me in the direction of your post Roger. It was educational.
      I am hoping to have some success to write about in spring. The fact that they are to be kept on the kitchen windowsill might help them along. Fingers crossed!

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  10. Often plants do often continue to grow roots when the tops are not growing. I think it depends where you are keeping the plants over winter as I am assuming they will be protected. If they 'd have made lots of root I'd have been tempted to pot them up into small pots but not in compost that is very cold and has been kept outside. Having said that the pot that you have them in looks to offer a fair amount of room so I think in this case I'd wait until spring to pot them on.I'd nip them out in spring too unless they start to grow sooner and become leggy. Usually cuttings are pinched back to two pairs of leaves.

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    1. I would never have given a thought to the temperatures of the compost Sue, for pointing that out too me, I thank you very much. It's given me a new understanding of how these things work.
      The cuttings are in the kitchen on the windowsill so I'm hoping this should help. It's only just dawned on my I should have mentioned that in the post.
      Thanks for the advice about pinching back too.

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  11. Yes, I agree, leave them for now but watch for new growth in the spring when they will be itching to grow! Repot them and also pinch them out at the tips to make them bush out, you will have a fantastic display next year.

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  12. I am still learning so I can't say but have enjoyed learning from what others have said, Angie that is a lovely purple blue salvia and the photo with the butterfly is beautiful, Frances

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