Saturday, 15 November 2014

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day November 2014

Unsurprisingly there are more blooms this November than last.  The extended warm days and nights have helped a lot I think.  We are now experiencing a more November like feel, yet the thermometer contradicts that!  We've only had a couple of measly little frosts and they've had no effect on the plants at all.

As well as sharing what's blooming in my garden, I'm using this post as a useful record of what I've been getting up to in the garden this last couple of weeks.

The shadier side of the gravel area has seen the removal of the small pond.  Half of this bed had been planted up in my previous post but everything is in and has been settling in.  I will not begin to see the fruits of my labour until spring.  It doesn't sound too far away if you say it fast, does it!

For obvious reasons, I can no longer call this border The Pond Bed, therefore it has been renamed The Mahonia Bed.  OK, The Mahonia Bed may be a tad unimaginative but it does exactly as it says on the tin.

The Mahonia Bed
Much to my surprise delight Anemone Andrea Atkinson has finally managed to open some blooms. Seen here mingling with Astrantia Ruby Wedding.  The Heuchera have been flowering all summer.  I moved Heuchera Binoche here 3 weeks ago and it didn't even flinch.  If you are in the market for a very dark, almost black leafed Heuchera, I can thoroughly recommend it.  Heuchera Marmalade is also flowering but I couldn't get a decent shot of it in the light available.

Left to Right: Astrantia Ruby Wedding, Anemone x hybrid Andrea Atkinson, Heuchera Paris
Mahonia x media Charity, Astrantia Snow Star and Heuchera Binoche

On the opposite side, the Bumble Bee border, has also been extended.  In all honesty, I think I was perhaps a bit too cautious at the time I carried out the work.  I'd have gotten away with adding more depth to the middle section.  The young Hawthorn tree planted earlier this year, will at some point in the future dictate the way this bed is planted but for now, there is still plenty of room to enjoy the perennials.  I've cleared out a few that were, quite frankly, clashing in terms of colour and replaced them with new Roses.  The two Escallonias that had struggled along have been removed.  For fence cover I'll be relying on Clematis and Honeysuckle.  Other than the Astrantia flowering in the back corner, you'd be hard pushed to see many blooms right now but there are one or two.  I'm also trying out the bird feeders here.  The lawn up in the top end of the garden has only just recovered from last year's mess.  I'm hoping that the sprouting seeds will be far easily removed from the gravel.  Despite the fact I do buy 'no mess' bird feed, this is indeed not the case.  Where it is now will also make replenishing the feeders far easier, especially when the weather is bad.




Campanula poscharskyana, Sanguisorba obtusa, Astrantia Buckland and Potentilla nepalensis Ron McBeath
Clematis texensis Princess Diana

Fuchsia magellanica Alba
Through the arch and into the back garden proper, The Wedgewood Rose continues to put on buds but sadly, when they open, they are not lasting very long.
The Wedgewood Rose
On the shadier side, the Enkianthus autumn colour has finally arrived.  Digitalis x mertonensis is still flowering and the Lupin blooms, which are a bit misshapen due to the fact that the stems had been caught under the Enkianthus.

Digitalis x mertonensis and Lupinus The Page
Emma and Eve!  Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton and Viburnum Eve Price that is, happily bloom together this November time.  I rather like them together.  Earlier in the year, Emma was paired with the blooms from some Heuchera and Sedum.  This little corner has really pleased me this year.  

Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton and Viburnum tinus Eve Price
Providing a little greenery in front of the shed, a selection of evergreens (in containers) along with a yellow chrysanthemum and some white lavender continues too bloom.  It's difficult to get a picture of the yellow chrysanths as the sun just glares against those yellow blooms.

Chrysanthemum and Lavender flowers in November
 At the other end of the deck, my miniature garden sits and basks in the sun all day long.  The alpine wallflower, Erysimum kotschyanum, is enjoying the extended good weather.  Those little yellow blooms look just like miniature yellow butterflies.  It's full of buds, a few more sunny days and they might all open.

Erysimum kotschyanum
The top border, which is the subject of my EOMV, I cut down the Helianthus and Cardoon.  You can now see the top tier clearly from the house.  Climbing rose, Warm Welcome, really doesn't belong up there.  My attempt at growing this rose together with Clematis montana has been a bit of a disaster.  The more I look at it, the more I can see how pruning is going to be an issue and even more so when the Cotinus grows up!  The Verbena bonariensis has been left in the hope that it self seeds.  I do this each year and each year it doesn't happen.  I always have to end up replacing the plants.  Luckily they are not too expensive.  Lupins and Persicaria are also still flowering away.

Rosa Warm Welcome, Lupins and Persicaria
Yet another clump of Persicaria flowering a bit further round.  Geum Bell Bank has spread out nicely, a bit too nicely and is just about to smother Bergenia Overture.  Note to self: find the Bergenia another home in spring.       


 
Persicaria JS Caliente and Geum Bell Bank blooming in November


Lady's mantle flowers continue to bloom beneath the Heptacodium.  The Heptacodium shows little signs that it's autumn other than the fact it has finished flowering.  When it's finished flowering the red sepals are supposed to remain for some time.  I've never experienced this as they just don't seem to appear.     


There's not a heck of a lot going on in the side garden right now.  It's mainly about the foliage right now but a few Cyclamen flowers are lingering and a late flowering Saxifrage.  It does suffer somewhat with the wind and never quite puts on as good a show as the other Saxifrage that bloom profusely in containers. 

Cyclamen hederifolium and Saxifraga fortune Blackberry and Apple Pie

The new layout of the front garden makes it's Blog Debut this November.  I've been working away in the front garden since early summer.  Some of the roses are still flowering away.  Namely, Lady of Shalott, The Lark Ascending and Port Sunlight. 

Front garden almost complete November 2014

I think my garden has exceeded all expectations this November.  It's nice to still have a few reminders of summer.  I thank you for joining me in a wee stroll around the garden and all that's left is for me to invite you over to May Dream Gardens where bloggers from around the world share what's blooming in their garden on the 15th of every month.   See you there! 

    

48 comments:

  1. What a fantastic garden you have, with such a wide range of beautiful flowers.

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    1. Thank you Jannibele. I do like growing lots of different plants and am having fun learning what likes and what does not like my garden.

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  2. Your garden is looking absolutely smashing Angie, especially considering how far north you are. Love the new front layout too, I can see the arch and fencing completely covered in glorious colour next year!

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    1. Thanks Jessica. I am surprised at what's still looking good too. The arch should be covered by next year but I've yet to choose some climbers for the trellis. I can't make my mind up on what I want. I think Clematis will probably win in the end.

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  3. Thank you for taking us on a stroll through your lovely garden and pointing out some of the delights found there.

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    1. I'm pleased you enjoyed the stroll as I enjoyed sharing with you all.

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  4. Oh, I do like dark Heucheras, I'll keep an eye out for Binoche. Your flowers are all beautiful, especially the roses. Thanks goodness there are some bloggers who have only been barely touched by frost, and still have plenty to show.

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    1. Dark leafed Heuchera are rather lovely aren't they Alison. The trouble is though there are too many!!
      We had another frost this morning, so I suspect what's left won't last too long now. I just need to keep up with clearing away all the mushy remains.
      I do hope your Polar vortex goes gentle on you!

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  5. I think it is amazing how many blooms you have Angie, you are so far North and you have had a couple of frosts. You are the only other person I have come across who grows Anemone Andrea Atkinson. I think it is lovely and much better than the ubiquitous Honerine Jobert.
    Your garden is still looking lovely.

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    1. It amazes me too Chloris. Honerine Jobert is rather popular but it's always nice to have something that's not so popular. Andrea Atkinson is new to the garden this year, I just hope she likes it enough to hang around.

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  6. Your hard work is paying off Angie... looking great and there's more to come. Spring'll be here before we know it.

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    1. I think you are right re spring Jane. My mind plays tricks on me this Autumn. The fact that it's still so mild, in comparison to previous years, I often forget we are mid November.

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  7. Wow, so much pretty for November, and in Edinburgh. I think your garden is growing just splendid. I do like a dark Heuchera, I'll look that one up.

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    1. Julie anne, it is a surprise to have so much going on up here. I think my garden has surprised many folks.

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  8. I've thoroughly enjoyed my tour of your garden, Angie; you have done a magnificent job and it all looks so good with SO many plants still flowering too! Thank you for giving me a few ideas for my own garden.

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    1. You are welcome Alison and thank you for stopping by.

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  9. Your gardens are beautiful! Really great for November.
    Most of us in the USA are experiencing an earlier than usual bout of really cold temperatures.
    Have a wonderful week-end!
    Lea

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    1. It amazes me how quickly the weather turns over there Lea. I have read a few blogs where temps have dropped. I hope it doesn't get as bad as it did last year for you all over the pond.

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  10. Dear Angie, your garden looks simply fabulous this month! I can completely see why it exceeded all your expectations, it is just plain lovely. I really admire that all the beds that you featured have something interesting blooming in them right now. That is quite an achievement! Since I am a rose nut, of course, I am particularly interested in yours and think that the Wedgwood Rose looks very pretty. The combination of Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton and Viburnum Eve Price is one of the most beautiful that you are showing in this post in my opinion. Congratulation also on your front yard. You must have worked so hard to get it to this point. It looks beautiful right now, but when the plants come into their own next spring it will knock your socks off. Great job! Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. You always say such nice things Christina. I had a feeling you'd like the roses. I hope you'll enjoy them more next year when the front garden fills out a bit more.
      I do try to have interest throughout year, it doesn't always pay off but it has this year.

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  11. You've done a great job in designing your garden Angie! You've created good structure and, given the success of your plants, you've also made great plant selections. You have a lot of plants that I can't grow successfully due to climate or drought or both, like the Heucheras (which look good for maybe a month, then wither up) and those gorgeous Astrantia (which I've long coveted). Happy GBBD!

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    1. Yes, those Heuchera are extremely thirsty plants Kris, suited to be grown here. They are however, loved by the Vine Weevil and her larvae, they can decimate them in just as short a time. I do love Astrantia too and I grow 6 different varieties.
      You do grow many plants that I covet too Kris, we can't have everything sadly, can we. :(

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  12. I love your miniature garden! And the wide shots of the bigger garden are beautiful. And the Roses!!! November is good to you. Usually November is quite morbid here, as well. But winter is here early this year--it's snowing tonight, so we'll wake to a winter wonderland. That's better in my book than a gray, plantless day. ;-)

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    1. You can't beat a sprinkling or two of snow Beth. I love when the world outside is covered in a blanket of snow . I'll be looking forward to you blogging about the snow.

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  13. You have obviously worked hard and it looks great! I love the miniature garden too. I planted a few alpines this year - must have picked the wrong ones because they haven't stayed beautifully compact like yours!

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    1. Thanks Patricia. I often cringe when I see plants labelled as alpines when deep down I know they are not after a short time. All mine's have been picked up at specialist alpine growers stands at plant shows.
      Most of the plants have been in the miniature garden for 3 years, so truly are small and compact.

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  14. Oh my, Angie, you've been a busy gardener. Everything looks so good in your Eden and there are lots of things still in bloom even in November! Happy GBBD!

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    1. Thank you ever so much. I'm really quite surprised at how good it looks in November.

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  15. There is so much still looking good in your garden, your flowers are so beautiful. You must have been working so hard in your garden, the results are there for us all to see.

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    1. Thanks Pauline, it's very pleasing to see the results of my effort.

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  16. The front garden looks lovely. Verbena bonariensis does self seed in our front garden bed (See I name borders imaginatively too)! and in between pacing stones,

    I'm think of getting an astrantia - Ruby Wedding for our new to be red and yellow border. Would you recommend it, Also I think I'll get a persicaria - which variety uis your red one?

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    1. Sue, Astrantia Ruby Wedding is a nice one, nicely shaped leaf too. The new foliage in springtime often has a tinge of grey. A. Ruby Star is another nice dark one. They are more of a pink red rather than an orange red, if you know what I mean.
      The persicaria is JS Caliente and like the Astrantia, the red is verging on the pink end of the scale and fades to a nice brick red.
      I would recommend both of them, they grow well in my garden. I don't think either like dry conditions though. If you fancy some of the Persicaria, drop me an email via the contact button and I'll send some down to you come spring if you like.

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  17. So glad to come across your blog! Your garden is just 2 months older than mine, and I am in the same frustrating stage: waiting for the plants to start filling in. Congratulations, because it seems that you have quite a lot more done than I do! I love how you've given your garden structure and "rooms". I still have lots of hard-scaping left to do myself, which is slow going because of the expense. I'll be taking a look around your blog.

    Saludos from Spain,
    Karen

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  18. Oh the mahonia bed could just as well be called the heuchera bed Angie - by whatever name it's called it is positively glowing with colour. I've not heard of heuchera 'Binoche' so off to investigate forthwith :)

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  19. So nice to see all your hard work presented here, it is looking absolutely fabulous! Can’t wait to see those arches covered in flowers, both at the front and at the back. I know what you mean about those bird feeders, I have moved mine several times and still haven’t found a good place for them – besides that, it seems like I am feeding more squirrels than birds so not sure what to do with them this winter.
    And as for spring, yes – as soon as we are past New Year ’s Eve I am in spring mood, waiting for my spring bulbs to flower, even though many won’t flower until February. But not long to go even so :-)

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  20. Hi Angie,

    Sounds to me like you've still been getting all the good weather up there. Here it's so soggy I can't do anything, and it's also speeding up the decaying process so my garden has far fewer plants blooming than yours - it also looks more dead in general. No chance of doing any sort of digging work here as it'll just damage my soil too much.
    Here I get very little in the way of bird seed - I feed sunflower hearts so there are no shell husks, peanuts and sometimes niger seed - but they are very messy and I do tend to get a lot of seedlings but are easy to pull out. So the only real mess is from the actual birds pooping.

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  21. You've done a marvellous job, Angie, congrats and it'll be great to follow the development of the new borders. Why did you remove the pond? Your design is a great example of how you can create different areas with different moods in a small plot. The Anemone and Astrantia are delightful as are all your plants really. Pleasure to visit your garden really and it's still full of interest. One plant has great autumn foliage, it's in with the Lupin and must be Enkianthus but I think it prefers acid soil which I don't have. Weather-wise you must have had a great year up in Scotland.

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  22. Love your Mahonia bed. In fact all your gardens are really looking great. Shows the determination you have to keep on changing whatever needs changing. Had to do a lot this year also with all the losses from last year and have some more I will make next year and hopefully will be done then.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  23. I enjoy your autumn garden Angie. The most I liked is your mini alpine garden, what a treat to look at! I also think these trellis and arch suit well to your front garden.

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  24. Hi Angie, your garden is a delight! And with so much still in bloom too. Love your miniature garden and with it's miniature yellow 'butterflies'. Many plants have incredibly beautiful names but I think The Lark Ascending has got to one of the best. Thanks for sharing and for leaving a comment on my blog earlier. About having time to craft ... I had to retire to find time :) Elizabeth

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  25. Oh Angie this is just so beautiful...all of it. I love hte The Mahonia Bed and the front garden too....my I am just swooning at your incredible work!

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  26. So beautiful Angie a real pleasure to see.

    Watch the height of your Mahonia I have 1 that's been in same spot in garden for 24 yrs its over 6ft tall and been pruned many times.

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  27. Hi Angie, You have a wonderful amount of colour in your garden'Up North'.
    I gave up feeding no mess bird food because of the weeds? I now feed Sunflower Hearts, all birds seem to eat them, with the bonus of the odd sunflower going in the garden.

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  28. Terrific November stroll around your garden Angie Your front garden is looking great and I love the arch. I equally like your Mahonia bed in fact I pinned your first picture, (get me) I just signed up with pinterest and to be honest, I haven't a clue. Seems like they already have loads of my pictures without me even adding them, ah well anything for an easy life.

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  29. I'm coming to your blog after such a long time though I am not yet back at my blog. How have you been? Wow! so many blooms in November; here everything is dead. The garden looks gorgeous as usual. By the way, my blog name has changed from beautiful boonton to http://world-and-novice-naturalist.blogspot.com/

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  30. How lovely! Thanks so much for sharing, and warm greetings from Montreal, Canada!

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  31. Your have a gorgeous garden ! I love all your flowers !

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