Wednesday, 15 October 2014

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day October 2014


In some ways mid October has crept up on me but weather wise, it has come with a great big wallop to the back of the head.  It's got remarkably cold this last couple of days and I'd be surprised if we don't get our first frosts quite soon.

Something I rarely do is compare the previous year's bloom day post, purely because I really only have 1 full years worth of posts as a comparison.  I thought the garden was looking so good  this October, I wanted to see just how different things were this time last year.  Lo and behold, things are not that different really.   My mind is obviously playing tricks on me.

The work I've been carrying out in the front garden is almost complete, the new arch was put in on Friday.  I had hoped to get it done a few days before hand but could not coordinate time with my son to hoist it into position.   The planting scheme in the front garden is loosely based, I say loosely, because my plans to have peach and yellow roses accented by the deepest of blue/purple perennial
Liriope muscari Royal Purple
hasn't quite gone to plan.  I have been attempting to source reliably hardy perennials in same shade as Salvia Amistad but they are scarce.  Of course, I set out on my search a bit late in the year.  I've already under planted all the roses with purple crocus, so come springtime I will be on the lookout for more.  In the meantime to fill the gaps, I have used blues, yellows, oranges and reds.  Following advice from a couple of you last bloom day post, I have successfully struck some cuttings and even after just 1 month they appear to be well rooted.  I only need to get them through winter time on the kitchen window sill now.  I live in hope that this sunny spot, between the hedge and fence is protection enough.

Salvia Amistad in October 2014

It's a toss up between the Salvia and Rosa The Lark Ascending as to which is my favourite new addition to the garden this year.  I just love both of them!  This rose is extremely healthy and very sturdy, it holds it's blooms upright remarkably well.  It hasn't stopped blooming since I brought it into the garden back in June.

Rosa The Lark Ascending October 2014
Of all the other Roses, which are I'm sure putting down roots rather that blooming again -  Port Sunlight and Lady of Shalott have lots of buds and the blooms that manage to open are pretty soon spoiled by wind.
Rosa Port Sunlight

Rosa Lady of Shalott

The only other blooms right now in the front garden are the Rudbeckia and Sedum Autumn Charm, charm by name, charm by nature.  This sedum is always the last one to flower in my garden.  I'm suspecting it may be a bit too pink to be out here but I'm letting it have it's moment before I move it round the back.  I spent an age the other day looking for the label for the Euphorbia griffithii Fireglow - no wonder I couldn't find it, it's balancing itself on top of the Sedum, can you see it?  I hate loosing plant labels - I like to keep them all for reference.

Rudbeckia Goldstrum and Sedum Autumn Charm

Wandering through the gate, the side garden has some mixed feelings towards autumn.  The Acer generally doesn't begin to turn bright red until nearer the end of the month and the star Magnolia is as fresh as ever.  The Hostas and deciduous ferns have began their decline, whilst the Primulas are refreshed and perking up now that the air is cool and damp.  I was complaining recently that the couple of Asters I grow were looking awful.  They generally don't do well but I had completely forgot about this one growing round here.  It's looking none too bad.


Under the Asplenium a few Cyclamen hederefolium flowers linger.  I like the leaf on this one, it's silver coloured centre is quite attractive.         

Cyclamen hederefolium
The honeysuckle further down the fence is holding onto a few blooms this late in the year.  It flowered beautifully back in June and has been producing blooms sporadically since then.  I thinned this out quite a bit and in my over zealous pruning, have lost most of the berries.   

Lonicera periclymenum Scentsaction
Round the back of the kitchen extension the secret shady bed is still looking remarkably well.  The Leucothoe have yet to show some Autumn colour but the Heuchera continue to flower this October.  Sadly the variageted Euonymus has almost reverted to pure green foliage.  Getting no direct sun I suspect is the cause. 

Left to Right: Heuchera Crimson Curls, Caramel and Marmalade

The gravel area outside the back door has had a bit of a redesign.  I've extended both the shady and sunny side this summer.  

The revamped shadier bed - a few Honeysuckle flowers on Lonicera periclymenum Sweet Sue at the top of the trellis.  Heuchera and Astrantia blooms are hanging on in their but the star of the show here right now is the Mahonia.  It's flowering earlier this year.  I'm pleased it's now making a sizable plant.  This bed now has better proportions I feel.  I had no real need to buy any new plants, everything growing in this bed before had got a bit cramped and just needed spaced out a bit better.  I did though treat myself to a lovely white flowered Japanese Anemone.  Her name is Andrea Atkinson.  She is full of buds but they refuse to open. 




Mahonia x media Charity

Astrantia Snow Star
The sunnier side is looking rather bereft of blooms at the moment.  I won't feel the benefit of my changes here until early next summer, in the far corner Astrantia Buckland and Sedum are flowering. The Sedum has been taking a bit of a battering.  Not from the weather but from the cats casing the few remaining bees that are around the garden.

Unnamed Sedum, Astrantia Buckland and Euphoria characias White Swan
This blue sage has been flowering all summer.  I almost ripped this plant out in springtime but am kind of glad I kept it now.  The dry year has really suited it.

Salvia x sylvestris Blue Queen
Sedum Gooseberry Fool is a favourite sedum of mine.  It's creamy white flowers have a tinge of bronze.  It flowers later in the year too.  The only down side is that the dying flowers look rather dirty and are not really very attractive.

Sedum telephium maximum Gooseberry Fool

Through to the back garden proper, the climbing rose on the arch has thrown up a few flowers but they look awful, I didn't waste my time taking any shots.  In the far right corner - also in need of extending since most of the plants have outgrown their allotted space.  I'm not sure how much scope for extending there is here but I'm loathe to loose this planting combination.  I had hoped to take Lady Emma Hamilton round to the front of the house but there really is no more room. 

Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton, Sedum Red Globe and Heuchera Palace Purple
in front of
Viburnum tinus Eve Price and Physocarpus opulifolius Burning Embers
Lady Emma just fills the air with her citrus scent - you don't have to get up close to appreciate it, you can sniff her out at one hundred paces!   Her bronzy foliage is just an added bonus.

Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton
Further round in this bed a couple of late flower stems of foxgloves have appeared.  They certainly don't have the stature of earlier blooms but are more than welcome this month.  No signs of autumn on the Enkianthus yet either.

Digitalis x mertonensis
Directly opposite, a clump of Persicaria is refusing to give up this year.  Sunlight squeezing between the houses opposite just catch the foliage at just the right spot.

Persicaria amplexicaulis JS Caliente
   
The hot sunny bed at the back of the garden, which most of you are familiar with, as it's the subject of my End of Month View.  It's still giving it's all.  Helianthus Lemon Queen stood up to the winds much better than I had anticipated.  A few stems have bent over but I can't be sure it's the wind too blame - it could have been the cats up to mischief!  I haven't the notion to struggle in there and tie them up.  The Persicaria and Helenium have been flowering non stop since the middle of July.  That's not bad going in my opinion.  Any plant that flowers for 3 months just has to be invaluable in the garden.  

Persicaria JS Caliente, Helianthus Lemon Queen, Helenium Moerheim Beauty and Sedum
Verbena bonariensis and Red Admiral butterfly
We are still seeing some Red Admiral butterflies in the garden on sunny days.  They are taking advantage of what blooms are left on the Verbena.

Before I invite you all over to May Dream Gardens to see what's blooming in everyone else's garden this October, I thought I'd share with you some sunflowers standing out against the bright blue sky this afternoon.   Thanks for reading.

Helianthus Lemon Queen
 
Helianthus Lemon Queen

 

41 comments:

  1. Ma quanto è bella quella Persicaria! La Amistad è molto soddisfacente, soprattutto in questo periodo! Anche qui sta fiorendo una Astrantia bianca come la tua!
    Complimenti per tutto! Sempre un piacere passare da qui :)

    Un saluto :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ancora una volta, grazie per i bei complimenti Pontos e come sempre è un piacere per hav visitare il mio giardino.
      Contento che ti piaccia queste piante e avete ancora Astrantia in fiore in questo periodo dell'anno.
      Grazie il mio amico italiano :)

      Delete
  2. Angie I am just loving your fall garden...your helianthus are giants and those peachy colored roses I want so bad in my garden. I think I may have to get one for a birthday present next year once I find the perfect spot for it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Donna. What a lovely birthday present to get. Are you like me, have a list of all things gardening for everyone to choose from.

      Delete
  3. The Lark Ascending is top of my want list for next year. Lady Emma Hamilton with the sedum and heuchera is stunning!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You wont be disappointed with it Jessica. It's a beautiful rose. I'm pleased with the Lady Emma combinations too. She's another gorgeous rose. If memory serves me right, you already have her in your garden don't you?

      Delete
  4. Beautiful, Angie. I love the way you put plants together. You really have a talent for it. I love Lark Ascending, it is superb. I am delighted to see you too have Andrea Atkinson. I think she is so much better than Honorine Jobert that one usually sees.
    You have a Persicaria which is new to me.J.S. Caliente. It is lovely. Your Salvia is looking wonderful but I think you are very wise to take cuttings. It would be awful to lose it.
    A lovely post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Chloris. The Anemone was a bit of an impulse buy since the GC didn't have what I wanted and it was just so wrong to come away empty handed, in fact rude! I read up about AA when I got it home and found 2 or 3 garden sites with the same opinion as you. Hopefully she will flower before the first frosts.
      JS Caliente was sourced at my local nursery, he grows it in his woodland garden. I'm lucky to live within 10 minutes drive of 2 top quality nurseries when you can always guarantee great plants and often some that are not so popular. Which is nice. I've a gardening friend that lives in Bristol and he often gets quite jealous I have such places right on my door step.
      I'm hoping the cuttings succeed too. They might save me a few pennies :)

      Delete
  5. We didn't manage to keep salvia Amistad over winter so maybe some protection would be a good idea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Much appreciate you letting me know re Amistad Sue. I will mulch the plant and possibly provide it with a fleece. I'm holding my hopes that the cuttings make it throw winter.

      Delete
    2. I took cuttings which rooted well Angie and then left them in the cold greenhouse and guess what happened

      Delete
    3. I'm presuming they died too Sue! I'm going to keep the cuttings on the kitchen windowsill. The kitchen is never too hot and is airy and light enough. I live in hope!

      Delete
  6. Hi Angie, your garden is sooo... lovely in October! Great photography in this post, too! Where to start? I think planting peach and yellow roses together with blue and purple perennials is a great color combination that really rocks. I love your salvia 'Amistad' and your yellow and peach roses are just a dream. Maybe 'Lady Emma Hamilton' is the most appealing to me. There is just something about the contrast of her bronze foliage and the very lovely color of the blooms. The more shady parts of your garden look absolutely terrific as well. Thanks for a great, inspiring post. I really want to get out into my garden now and get my hands dirty! Warm regards,
    Christina

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know exactly what you mean about LEH Christina - she has incredible likeabilty!
      I do hope you manage to get out and get some dirt under those finger nails - it's a drizzly day here today, perfect gardening weather but I've too much to do indoors today.

      Delete
  7. A couple of years ago when Salvia Amisatd was in every nursery, and everyone around here was buying it, I resisted. I haven't seen it that much this year. I keep wondering if I should have succumbed. Excellent rundown of what's blooming in your garden right now. I have a large clump of Helianthus, not sure what variety, but one very large branch bent right over and cracked.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 10 out of 10 for resisting Alison. Obviously I had no such restraint! I wonder if it proved just to tender to be so popular. I'm reading on different website comments re it's hardiness but here in Scotland it's generally the wet that does the plant in!
      I hope the branch of the Helianthus didn't do too much damage. You've just reminded me to sort out the cardoon stems. They are veering towards the horizontal now!

      Delete
  8. I'm eating up the sunflowers against bright blue sky. You would think we'd have gotten our fill, with the summer we've had. Now that the rains have set in, I'm missing it already. Things are still looking fabulous at your place.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It doesn't take long to miss summer Rickii, does it? We are having drizzle today and although it's delightful to watch the trees turning, I know exactly what you mean.

      Delete
  9. Very colorful assortments in your garden. I noticed the Asplenium nidus or bird's nest fern, i didn't know it thrives in temperate climes. It is a tropical plant, have lots of them here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Kalantikan. The Asplenium I grow here is Asplenium scolopendrium a northern hemisphere native. I googled A. nidus and see it's a tropical plant and would only last outdoors here in summer. They are very similar in looks, as you'd expect being from the same family I suppose.
      A. scolopendruim's common name here is Hart's Tongue Fern and so called because the frond looks like a Hart's (deer) Tongue. Evergreen too so that's a bonus.

      Delete
  10. Fabulous. I think my favorites among the plants you've shown here are the Astrantias, the Mahonias, and the Heucheras. But everything looks quite healthy and full. I'd never know that you were near frost. A very nice post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Beth. The Astrantias are one of my favourites too and nice to have them bloom this late in the year. The Mahonia is a plant I never used to like but has kind of grown on me and it provides interest at this time of the year when everything else is just about to go to sleep for winter.

      Delete
  11. Your garden is incredibly beautiful, Angie! You should be very proud of the work you've done. I sit here asking myself why I don't have any peach-colored roses - I must fix that (drought or no drought)!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kris - I looking foward to seeing a peach coloured rose in your garden sometime soon ;)

      Delete
  12. You certainly have a gift for combining your plants so well, your borders all look so lovely. Your roses are so beautiful, at one time, many, many years ago, I lived near Port Sunlight! I hope the frost stays away for a bit longer so that you have more time to enjoy your blooms.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a lovely thing to say Pauline, thank you. Yes, I do hope the frost keeps away but for the fact that I've yet to sort our where to put everything that needs put away for winter. The neighbour hasn't emptied out their greenhouse yet and I really want to get my Fuchsia in there. It's a great arrangment. I give her plants for the garden, she uses her greenhouse in summer and I use it in winter. Everyone is happy. Should she ever move, I might need to get my own!

      Delete
  13. Angie you have such a beautiful full garden, I really like the idea of peach and yellow under planted with blues and purples, the later 2 colours being my favourites and I've always thought how nicely yellow complements them, as would peach too, and thank you all your mention of roses has reminded me that I can now think about adding another couple of roses to my species rose border,
    you have some lovely foliage in your shady areas and your hot and sunny bed looks fabulous, personally I think a few floppy flower heads look nice and natural, some staked flowers are fine but not too much as for me it becomes ridged, I'm glad you got the arch up now, Frances

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Blue is my favourite colour too Frances and am always drawn to those colours in the GC. I have to make sure the plants out there don't clash with the Tropaeolum as it makes such a statement in summer.
      I don't go much for staked plants. It's not a good look.
      Good luck with choosing some species roses for your border, I will look forward to reading about your choice.

      Delete
  14. I like your ascending lark and as usual there's much to see and admire in your well planned plot, Angie. Your Liriope look fab - just moved mine in the hope that they'll do something some day. The Persicaria are stunning and I also like the Heuchera corner and the way you weave in ferns. Very inspiring!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm reading mixed reviews on the Liriope Annette. I hope yours loves it's new home and puts on a good show for you next year..
      The Heuchera corner started out as a necessity as I had bought too many shade lovers and didn't have enough space for them. The Heuchera really like it and it's where I bring on the plants I have divided when they been munched by the VWB!

      Delete
  15. Hi Angie!
    I'm here in your blog, reading and watching your photos. You have lovely blog and garden! Your Heuchera is very pretty and I saw the hosta leaves are yellow as mine are, we have very low temps today +6 C. Thank you for following my blog. I will follow yours!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Oooh, Port Sunlight is really pretty! Great scenes from the garden as well. Good luck with the white anemone you mentioned in your comment - I have killed 5 or 6 types in my garden, and only A. robustissima has made it through a couple of winters.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Still plenty of interest in your garden and the roses are stunning.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Angie-You still have so much going on in your gardens for this time of year. Your roses and Salvia Amistad are outstanding as well as all your other blooms! Happy GBBD!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Oh how I love 'The Lark Ascending', the name, the flower ... oh, just everything! However, the salvia looks fantastic too. Do you know how hardy it is Angie ? The lack of hardiness has put me off in the past, but I am happy to be converted !

    ReplyDelete
  20. It’s always a delight to visit your garden Angie, and all your planning is certainly paying off. I also save all my plant labels, I have a big box of 12 years’ worth of labels, even for those plants I no longer have. It’s great fun to go through the box and look at the plants I bought in the early days of gardening here, plants no longer in the garden for all sorts of reason.

    Your Lady Emma Hamilton is a lovely rose, one of many I wish I had room for in my own garden, and I love your colour scheme for the front garden. I hope winter is a looong way away still for you, fingers crossed we get a repeat of last winter both of us :-)
    (And no flooding for any of us!)
    Take care, Helene.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Your garden is still looking very beautiful Angie. The liriope in my garden is a strange one. The year before full of beautiful flowers and this year not one. I love the roses you are showing.
    Have a wonderful weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Oh some beautiful autumnal blooms Angie. Any flower that flowers for three months or more is certainly what could be a "good doer". Glad to read that your salvia cuttings have taken as so have mine :) Now as you say it's just a matter of getting them through the winter which will be a challenge. I do like your new rose. I only came across mention of 'A Lark Ascending' in another blog yesterday and wondered what it looked like and now I know :) A beauty. Does she have much scent? 'Port Sunlight' is just down the road from me.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Still so much colour in your garden Angie, my Mahonia japonica is just coming into flower such a welcome sight as even though it flowers in the winter the yellow colour makes me think of Spring. Unfortunately I suffer from the same problems as yourself with Euonymus, one I have had for several years is destined for the dustbin, although I have pruned out the green stems religiously over the years I have given up the battle, the reversion has won, the garden is just too shady.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Wow, Angie – your borders were stunning last week! Hope today’s winds haven’t done too much damage to your taller plants. You must be thrilled with the way your borders have taken shape now – what a number of plants you have there too :-)

    Too many plants to comment on so I’ll pick out the first one that caught my eye - Liriope muscari Royal Purple :-) I’d like to put that one on my wish list but can’t decide on where it would go in my garden. I always admire a planting strip of this at Edinburgh Botanics (top path above Chinese Garden) – perhaps you’ve seen it there too :-)

    ReplyDelete

Your comments are appreciated. My blog is currently experiencing issues with some readers reporting problems when posting their comments. Please bear with me whilst I try to rectify the problem.
I have temporarily switched on word verification. I apologise for this, personally, I don't like it either, I am hoping this may help.