Wednesday, 1 October 2014

End of Month View September 2014

End of Month View August 2014
According to the press, we are, here in Edinburgh experiencing one of the driest Septembers on record this year.  I'd pretty much agree with that!

The only thing normal about the weather this week is the wind.  We've had a fair few good drying days - is that a saying those of you from other parts of the country or planet use?  It's regularly used by neighbours here abouts as a way of passing the time of day.    






Helianthus Lemon Queen, must have put on another foot of growth over the past 4 weeks - I just love the size of these beauties and they are doing a far better job of hiding fencing than the shrubs are right now.  The cardoons are long past their best, I read somewhere that the birds should enjoy the seeds from this plant,   I'm not sure how long those bone dry stems will last in this wind, so they'd best get a move on!  It's hard to miss the acid yellow berries on the Pyracantha (P. Golden Charmer) covering the back fence.  Both the Helianthus and Pyracantha really stand out when the sun has gone over the roof tops.

Cardoon seed heads
On a scale of 1 to 10, one being unhappy and 10 being ecstatic, I'd say I am probably around a 7.5 with this new border but putting together this post over the last 9 months will prove useful to me whilst planning what needs doing between now and spring. 
   
My favourite combo in this bed just has to be the trio of  Persicaria, Sedum and Helenium.  I removed Hydrangea paniculata Pinky Winky, as I had better use for it elsewhere in the garden.  When I get round to my autumn tidy up, I will move the clump of Crocosmia Lucifer back a bit towards the fence, where it will get even more room and make a sizable clump before too long.  Slap bang in the middle is a lovely grass, Chionochloa rubra (a native of New Zealand), commonly known as red tussock.  It makes a gorgeous mature specimen, as seen in my local nursery, whether or not it survives the winter wet in the ground here, remains to be seen.  I've grown this for 2 years in a container but have chanced it in the ground this year.   I think the pot was holding it back and it's enjoyed getting it's feet in the soil.  Keep your fingers crossed for it please.  



Butterflies and Bees enjoying the late summer sun.  Thankfully there is still plenty on offer for them. 




The little Aster that appeared from beneath the foliage of a geum a wee while back, is just now blooming it's little heart out.  Now why can't the others look this good?  I have these dotted around the garden and all of them are looking, well, rotten really.  That's as good a word to describe them as any I suppose.  This little clump is a remnant returning after the floods of 2012. 

Aster novi-belgii Purple Dome
If we do a 180° turn and look back down towards the house,  the young Rowan is just beginning to look autumnal and I was absolutely fed up looking at the rust ridden Kilmarnock Willow - it's been relegated to the great big garden waste container at the local dump.  The Laburnum I purchased for elsewhere in the garden back in spring has been moved into it's spot.  I am much more happy with this area now.  Those Laurels at the back are going to a neighbour just as soon as we can coordinate removal.   We missed the window of opportunity back in spring, hopefully she can get herself into gear and ready to receive them at some point in the next few weeks.     





Autumn foliage on Sorbus Autumn Spire
My plans over the next few weeks will be to cut back and tidy up what's needed in this area.  Since I haven't done any weeding in and around the plants since back in spring, I have noticed that there are a few clumps of creeping buttercup appearing here and there and the odd marestail popping up.  The buttercup will be easy to eradicate but the marestail no so!

Thanks for reading my End of Month View this September.  Please join me and other garden bloggers over at The Patient Gardeners Weblog who are posting this month.

40 comments:

  1. What a lovely blue sky features in your photos Angie. Everything is looking fab and still perky! I love Helenium 'Lemon Queen' and have seen it on several blogs recently, and everyone praises it highly. What better recommendation is there ?

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    1. Jane, blue skies at this time of the year are very welcome! I first came across Lemon Queen on a blog and immediately knew I had to have it. I am so pleased with it. I tend to avoid yellows but so glad I didn't avoid this.

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  2. The border has come together so well, I think you're being a little hard on yourself with only a 7.5. But we are all our own worst critics I guess. I love the foliage on the Sorbus, it looks brilliant with those yellow berries.

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    1. Thanks Jessica - I should explain why I chose 7.5 rather than a higher score. I divided the border into three sections and of those 2 I am really happy and the section to the right hand side needs work but gave myself 1 point for effort. Had I the foresight to place the cardoon where the verbena is and vice versa it would have been almost 10 :)
      I just love this Sorbus and so glad I spent time researching and sourcing it.

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  3. Non so nemmeno da dove cominciare, mi sembra tutto così perfetto! Per prima cosa ti faccio ancora i complimenti! Quel 'Lemon Queen' è bellissimo, l'ho visto in un vivaio in zona ma è troppo grande per il mio giardino :(

    Anche la Persicaria che hai messo in combo è interessante! Se cresce anche a mezz'ombra potrei acquistarla :)

    Infine: quel Sorbus, sono geloso ogni volta che lo vedo! Sicuramente lo devo comperare appena lo trovo :D Mi piace davvero moltissimo!

    Continua così perchè è sempre un piacere passare da te!!! Un saluto :)

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    1. Un peccato la Helianthus è troppo grande per il vostro giardino Pontos. E 'davvero brillare!
      C'è di male nel provare la Persicaria in ombra, sarebbe valsa la pena, se lo ha fatto prosperare.
      Spero si riesce a procurarsi il Sorbus - sarebbe bello nel vostro giardino.
      Ancora una volta, grazie mille per i complimenti.

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  4. Dear Angie, I really enjoyed reading your End of the Month View September post! I think the border that you are featuring is looking fabulous. I love the helianthus 'Lemon Queen', what a hard working and lovely plant. The a little aster is really a darling plant as well. Wired that this one is doing so well for you, versus others just don't. I really envy you how full and lush everything is looking despite that you had dry month. I have started with some fall clean-up in the front yard and almost everything looks exhausted from the dry heat without end that we were having. Can't wait for the weather to cool down consistently. Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. Thank you Christina.
      I do hope you get some cool weather to spur you on with your autumn clean up. One great thing about gardening in Scotland is that it's never too hot too garden. Our complaint is that it's sometimes too wet, so you can see why we get excited when it dry ;)

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  5. Your helianthus looks amazing and so tall - I wish I had room for another yellow plant. Those cardoon seed pods are great too. What variety of Persicaria is in the photo with the sedum? Is it the same one in the later photo which is really catching the sun? I think I might get another one if I can find a space for it.

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    1. Yes, Annette it is the same variety. It's P. amplexicaulis JS Caliente. Don't go buying it if you have the space. I'll send you some up. I'll drop you an email.

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  6. You give yourself only a 7,5........I think it certainly must be 8,5! Remember that this border is still very young and it looks already if it's there for years. I have this years problems with my asters too and have only one variety in flower, last year several different asterss flowering beautifully, may be the rabbits have eaten the new shoots in spring, very strange.

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    1. I hope you find out what's been going on with your Asters Janneke. It's so annoying when we just don't know what the problem is. I'm lucky in so much as rabbits tend not to venture from the fields and rural areas into the garden. I suppose one day they will.
      Thanks for awarding me an 8.5, I should be so critical should I ;)

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  7. Yours is the second blog to feature 'Lemon Queen'. She is definitely growing on me.

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    1. Does that mean you'll be considering giving it a try Rickii? It certainly makes a great statement at this time of the year.

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  8. Your garden continues to impress me month after month, Angie! My H. 'Lemon Queen' didn't have anything approaching the vigor of your plants - it might as well be a different species. Of course, your dry summer is probably wetter than our wettest winter, at least of late. We just racked up the 4th driest year on record in California with no indication that the new rain year (which runs from October 2014-September 2015) will be any better. I'm investing in succulents and other drought tolerant species.

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    1. Thanks Kris. Perhaps there is a different Lemon Queen available over there. This one's perennial - was yours?
      Your gardening conditions are far more harsh than ours in my opinion and investing the way you are is wise. A plant in the right conditions is far better than one that is toiling and looking the worse for wear don't you think.

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  9. Oh the autumn foliage is beautiful! Your lush garden is so impressive!! So good to have stopped by. Thank you for a great post, Angie! You have a wonderful day.

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    1. And thank you for stopping by Stephanie - glad you enjoyed your visit. Little signs of autumn here yet but it was very cold last night, so I suspect that will have an impact sooner rather than later.

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  10. If your garden looks that lush and stunning in the drought, Angie, you can't complain! ;) Lovely borders and I especially like the view back towards the house. Purple Dome is on my wish list too...I think I have to create new borders. Also to accomodate Lemon Queen which was such a star plant in my last garden. Enjoy the fine weather! PS: Are you happy with the results of the vote?

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    1. I certainly don't complain when we have gorgeous weather Annette. I'm a sun worshiper and just can't get enough of it.
      Will be looking forward to seeing your new borders. I've no doubt they'll be as stunning as the rest of your garden. The Helianthus looks so good because you gave me the advise very early on to make sure they are well watered - I followed that advice and am reaping the benefits so thank you very much.
      Am extremely happy with the result of the vote - I had always been a no voter as I am extremely proud to be both Scottish and British. Job security was my major concern. I'd love to say thankfully it's all over but I'm not convinced it is!!

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  11. it is all looking good Angie, the helianthus flowers with the pyracantha berries look lovely together, it only seems like yesterday you were putting up the trellis and moving the shed yet now it looks like it has been this way forever, despite your lack of rain it all looks very lush, enjoy your dry at least you can get out and work in the garden without ending up covered in mud! Frances

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    1. Thanks for the lovely compliments Frances, they are much appreciated.
      The rain is due to return tonight apparently so I doubt I'll be gardening in such dry conditions after tomorrow.
      I am really pleased I made the decision to move the shed now.

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  12. Surely an 8.5 Angie?! And that rudbekia + Persicaria + sedum is certainly a winning combo, I was struck by the use of persicarias in front of heleniums at Harlow Carr last month, which I suppose is similar, definitely a classic. And the combination of berries and helianthus in full bloom is really good, it must glow in the soft autumn sunshine. All very lovely.

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    1. Thanks Janet. Those Rudbeckia are actually Heleniums Janet ;) If it's good enough for Harlow Carr, it's good enough for me :)
      I'm hoping to make the 8.5/9 mark next year :)

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    2. I'd be putting that down to age Janet...lol!

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  13. The border looks beautiful in that light. Your purple dome is further in flowering than ours.

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    1. Crikey - here's me thinking mine are quite late, obviously not Sue. I hope yours don't struggle as much as mines do elsewhere in the garden. The ones out front are an absolute mess!

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  14. So many things to enjoy. Persicaria always catches my eye. I hope your cardoon seed heads last a bit longer, such beautiful structure, and it would be a thrill to see a bird taking its fill.

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    1. I love the Persicaria Marian. I can even remember the first time I saw it growing in the woodland garden in my local nursery and knew I just have to have it.
      I do hope the birds take the seeds but as I said above, the wind might put paid to my efforts in trying to keep them. The stems are very dry and are creeking each time they move.

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  15. Hi Angie,

    Well, I think your garden is looking wonderful - sometimes it's much easier to see the bad rather than the good in one's own garden! I do it all the time. Often think mine looks awful... I wonder if it actually does??? hrm. Perhaps that's not a can of worms I wish to open ;)

    I love Persicaria and Helenium together too. Discovered it a few years ago but this year the Helenium was a very poor show and those planted with the Persicaria have yet to bloom.

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  16. It's always easier to nit pick our own gardens Liz, I blame my short comings on my inexperience - I do wonder if ever I'll change. I doubt it. If it helps, your garden is gorgeous and too me, your combos always look great.
    The Persicaria and Helenium have been growing in a different bed for a few years but it was rather small, this year given more room it looks so much better.
    I read somewhere when I first planted the Helenium that giving them a right good soaking in spring just as the new growth appears really helps them on their way. It's what I do but whether or not it actually makes a difference I don't know as it's a practice I've always followed. I might, if I remember, leave some alone in springtime to compare. I hope yours that aren't flowering will eventually and it's not a bit too late weather wise.

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  17. Well, your garden is very lovely and full right now! Mine is slowing down for winter but you don't seem to be slowing at all. Great combos and photos.

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  18. I just read your previous comment about caring for Heleniums and I shall try that, yours look so good and mine were pathetic this year; I expect it was lack of moisture at the right time.
    I keep seeing that lovely Helianthus, it is so pretty. Do you think it is invasive? I have one called Russian Gold which seems to have designs on the entire garden.
    I googled Purple Dome and sometimes it is listed as Novae- Angliae and sometimes as Novi- belgii. The RHS site lists it as Novae- Angliae so I will go with that as I can' t tell the difference.
    I just love your SorbusAutumn Spire, excellent choice.

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  19. Argh - Google seems to have lost my comment! Ok, it was something like: the border is coming into it's own and looking great. Love the Persicaria, Sedum and Helenium trio, and the aster. Enjoy reading your monthly updates. I have used the term 'good drying day' in all places I've lived, Melbourne, Oxford & Sheffield.

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  20. Hi Angie, your garden is looking just great as usual, I am amazed that your Lemon Queen has even outstripped the Cardoon in height, it is a very useful plant and another one you are tempting me to add to my must have list. Down here I used to hear my mother refer to a good drying day meaning a dry blustery day that got the clothes on the washing line dry, I assume this is the same as your meaning.

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  21. Your bed is filling in nicely and looking so established already. And the sorbus is very pretty, it will be a majestic tree in a few years’ time. Loved your little aster, I have only one in my garden so haven’t got much experience, mine is in complete shade and is happy there. But I have 3 more on order for delivery next week, so I will have to read up on issues…. Oh, and give yourself a much better than 7.5, you deserve that :-)

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  22. I think your border looks great.. love the bee and butterfly photos :o)

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  23. Your September garden looks most bright and colourful Angie. Wasn't it just a fabulous month? We use the phrase ' a good drying day' in the north west of England. Doesn't look as if there's going to be many of them this week though. What are you feeding that helianthus on?

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  24. Angie look at the flowers taking on a bit of an autumn look...and I love the 180 degree view...

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