Monday, 15 September 2014

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day September 2014



As well as my Bloom Day post, I'm kind of using this post as an update to what's been going on in the garden this last couple of weeks.  I'm having a hard time juggling everything at the moment and not had so much time to spend blogging.  I do try to keep up with what's been going on in your gardens, albeit I don't often have time to comment, please know I have been reading!

The promised Indian Summer, I think, got lost on it's way across the globe!  Granted temperatures have been a little higher than I'd normally expect here but from early evenings through to late mornings, it's been misty and damp, so a bit like India in the Wet Season.  The plants taking full advantage and I'm pleased that one or two are blooming for a second time this year.

Last post, there was a Hellebore flowering out of season.  This September, a Rhododendron and Cowslip have joined the party!  You are not seeing things.  This Rhododendron flowers at the end of every summer, I've read that Rhododendrons often rebloom if the season has been very dry.  Whilst it has been dry here, same can't be said of previous years and yet it bloomed bang on time in September the past 7 years.  I thinned out the Honeysuckle (L periclymenum Scentsation) in the larger picture and it seems to have taken exception and put on just as much new growth as I cut out, which kind of defeated the purpose really.  L Sweet Sue on the large trellis, flowered way back in May and that too seems to have found it's second wind.  I mentioned back in my July post that I was about to chop the Astrantia back to encourage a second flush of flowers.  A few of you commented on this at that time and as you can see - it works!  All now have lovely healthy foliage and pushing up a few flowers, which will continue right to the first heavy frosts.

Roses reblooming this September - the only two plants not new to the garden this year are The Wedgewood Rose and Princess Alexandra of Kent.  I've fallen head over heals with Apricot and Yellow Roses this year.      


Rosa: (clockwise from top left) The Wedgewood Rose, The Lark Ascending, Lady of Shallot,
Graham Thomas, Crimson Cascade, Susan Williams Ellis and Princess Alexandra of Kent
I'm sure I've mentioned previously that peach/apricot roses will be the main feature of the front garden in future summers.  My improvements have been popped on hold.  I ordered Crocus bulbs online almost a fortnight ago and have yet to be dispatched.  This is the first time I've ordered any sort of plant on line and thus far, I can say I'm not terribly impressed.  I want to get those Crocus bulbs in under the roses before I get the perennials in, it would make planting a whole lot easier.  I've also ordered an arch, which will define the entrance to the front garden.  This I had not expected to be delivered so quickly, allowing me to get on with the other jobs, alas I'm stuck in limbo - I just don't possess such patience!        

Out front at the moment, the Rudbeckia are still looking great, a yellow late flowering Kniphofia has finally decided to throw up some flower stems.  I suspect that these two will be a bit too zingy for my plans out here but lets enjoy them for now.  The pot of orange begonias covers some bare earth before the cats get their paws on it!

Rudbeckia and Kniphofia Bees Lemon
I'd like to introduce you to the culprit behind my latest plant addiction Rosa The Lark Ascending. The first rose I bought for the front garden, as soon as it bloomed - I was hooked!  Seen here with Salvia Amistad.  I have to say, of all the perennials in the garden, this newcomer has kind of taken my breath away.  I'm reading conflicting reports on it's hardiness therefore I must get some cuttings on the go tout suite!  The trellising is also new and doing a grand job of keeping back the neighbour's Kerria.  Now all I need do is concentrate on the suckers coming under the fence.  Whilst I detest this plant for it's growth habit, I don't mind the flowers.  Because of the way she prunes hacks at it, it flowers all year round.  I suspect, that's also the reason for all those suckers, her plant is trying its best to get out of the reach of those shears of hers.

Rosa The Lark Ascending and Salvia Amistad
A clump of Shasta daisies, having spent a couple of years in a container, struggled this year.  Now they have their roots in the ground are making a bit of an improvement.

Leucanthemum Snow Lady

The Buddleia providing much needed nourishment for the butterflies that are now starting to appear. The butterflies have obviously been about, just not in my garden, judging by the damage done on this red admiral's wings.

Buddleia davidii Empire Blue and Red Admiral butterfly
As we go through the gate down the side path, the side garden it mainly a spring border and along with the out of season Rhododendron blooms there are a few wee autumn treasurers too.

Inherited dwaft Rhododendron

Cyclamen hederifolium and Colchicum
Out in the back garden, thinning out the bumble bee border is finished.  I took full advantage of the cooling temperatures and got to work on it.  The over crowded clumps of daylilies have all gone (elsewhere), the mildew infected groups of Monarda have gone to the great bit compost bin in the sky and the Escallonia who's only purpose (not intentional) was too act as support for a Clematis has been chopped back.  Unfortunately, getting it out of the ground is not going to be such an easy job.  I need to look into treating it with something to kill the roots in situ.  Come to think of it, I'm not sure 'The Bumblebee Border' is a suitable description now.  I need to rethink that description and rechristen it.

Three roses (Susan Williams Ellis, Princess Alexandera of Kent and Rhapsody in Blue) were used as colour inspiration.  The colours theme in this border will be Pink, Blue and White.  The newly extended space will, I hope, give this border a bit more of a cottage feel.  The Honeysuckle and Clematis already growing there will cover the fence and trellis, taller perennial foliage will also do their bit.  I've kept and added to the collection of good old garden stalwarts, aquilegia, peonies, hardy geraniums, sedums, nepeta and oriental poppies - this far corner still has a fair bit of colour and one of my favourite late summer bloomers is just coming into bloom.  Even one single flower stalk fills the air with it's sweet, almost candy like scent.  Just wish I could put my finger on what it reminded me of.

Actaea simplex Pink Spike, Rosa Princess Alexandra of Kent, Sedum (unknown), Anemone Pocahontus
 and Sedum Purple Emperor.  Still blooming in September

Lemon Scented Perlargoniums have only just decided to flower!  These are the remaining plants from cuttings I took last year.  I had cuttings root in water and a few gardening friends and neighbours have been gifted the remainder. 

There is little to see in the left hand side of this border, new plants are still small and other perennials are currently in die back mode.  A couple of Sedums are however, just coming into their own.

Sedum telephium maximum Gooseberry Fool

Sedum cauticola Coca Cola

                 
Over the other side of the trellis - plenty of foliage paired with a few Clematis flowers.  The late summer flowering shrub Heptacodium miconoides is just coming into bloom.  You know it's been a good summer here when it flowers.  In general, this usually flowers later and the buds have been known to get caught by an early frost.  The Alchemilla is also throwing up a few late blooms too.


I had hoped Clematis Ville de Lyon would not suffer the powdery mildew it used to in it's old home but the move has not improved things.  I will, I think, need to source a replacement - a far more resistant form.
Clematis Ville de Lyon
You know it's been a good summer if the Heptacodium manages to flower before the first frosts hit them.  There are not many shrubs that flower this late in the year and the fact that it's scented is another bonus.  It's a cousin of the Honeysuckle, just in case you are interested.

Heptacodium miconoides
aka Seven Son Flower Tree
The top end, the sunniest spot in the garden and the topic of my EOMV is still looking in reasonable, I think. The perennial sunflower, Helianthus Lemon Queen, has exceeded my expectation.   New flowers are opening every day.  For the moment, I am leaving the tall stems of the Cardoon alone.  I am interested to see if the birds are attracted to those seed heads.  The yellow/orange berries of the Pyracantha adds a bit of colour to the back fence.  Sedum, Persicaria, Crocosmia, Verbena and Helenium still have their wares on offer for the pollinators. 
   

Persicaria JS Caliente, Chinochloa rubra and Sedum
In the purple corner, there really is a bit too much purple foliage going on here.  This was not intentional, it was the only place I had gaps in which to move a couple of plants back in springtime when I was planting the trees.  I had also forgot the left over foxglove plant, that had been temporarily heeled in too.  The colour of the strawberry foxglove pairs perfectly with the darker foliage. 

Digitalis x mertonensis, Sedum Red Globe and Persicaria Red Dragon
I love the Sedum and Heuchera combo - I do however need to keep on top of not letting the Heuchera flowers, otherwise it all gets a bit busy.  Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton, trapped between them and the Viburnum will be moved into the front garden pretty soon.  She flowered pretty poorly this year, I don't know if it's lack of sun or lack of space.  The foliage is healthy enough, which I would have thought was a sign she was happy enough.

Sedum Red Globe and Heuchera Palace Purple
More contrast and yet more purple foliage - this time Physocarpus Burning Embers makes a wonderful foil for the flowers of Kierengeshoma palmatum.

Physocarpus Burning Embers and Kirengeshoma palmatum
Well, that's just about it from my garden this September Bloomday post, as usual, it ends with an invitation to join myself and many other garden bloggers posting on the 15th of every month on what's blooming in their garden, regardless of where you garden.  We all love a nosy around other folks gardens don't we?  You can join in here too!

I end with a shot of the Fuchsias on the back steps. You can read all about how they came to my garden here.  I grow these for my mum (she lives with me), she loves Fuchsia and I'm not their greatest fan but for once I relented and to be honest, I'm kind of glad I did, they add a bit of colour to an otherwise dull stone step.

    

46 comments:

  1. Hi Angie,

    What a lovely garden you have and I wish mine was as lovely with all your combinations and interesting foliage and such. Of course also jealous that you still have so much happening, but such is life and I knew I'd struggle at the end of the season because everything was blooming just so early this year compared to previous years.

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    1. Hi Liz, yes as I've read blogs over the last few months, the thought of some southern gardens running out to steam, so to speak, late summer crossed my mind. I had wondered if my garden might do the same but as I said above, the bit of rain and mist has kind of revitalised it in places. Thanks for the compliments - they are much appreciated.

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  2. What a beautiful garden! One of the things I love about Bloom Day is getting to see how different climates affect gardens. I had no idea Scotland could be so floriferous at this time of the year. Just lovely.

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    1. CommonWeeder, Scotland is a great climate in which to garden - depends on who you ask though ;).
      Happy to hear you think I have a beautiful garden - you can't possibly know how nice it it to hear that :)

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  3. Oh what fabulous September blooms Angie - your garden is positively glowing with colour. I'm sorry to read that you've not been enjoying the same fabulous weather that we have in the north west of England. It has gone some way to compensating for an abysmal August. Now why didn't I chop my astrantias back in July? :( I love the green container in your last photo. Is it frost hardy?

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    1. Why, thank you kindly Anna! I think the misty weather was consigned to the east coast, I work with a few guys from Aberdeen and Inverness on a nightly basis and they we experiencing similar.
      Glad you like the green container, it's a cracker isn't it? You would not believe how I came by it and a few others......a neighbour was clearing out an elderly relatives house and had a pile of pots sitting waiting to go to the dump. I asked if I could help myself and the answer was yes. I have no idea if it is frost proof or not but I am doubtful. I don't plant it up - I just use it as a vessel to store a plastic pot. I pop it in the shed for winten, where it seems fine.

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  4. What a wonderful display of flowers you have, your garden is looking lovely. I like all your fuchsias, especially the one at the back, does it have a name?
    How strange that your Rhododendron is flowering now, I have a couple of candelabra primulas that are mixed up too and can't wait till spring to flower.

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    1. Pauline, there is rarely a season that goes by that I don't have something blooming out of course. This Rhoddie is very reliable at flowering at this time of the year.
      Wish my Candelarbra primulas would re flower - their cheery blooms would be most welcome.

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  5. Wow, Angie… what a great garden update for you to look back on! What a collection of plants you must have in your garden now – you’re a serious plants person it’s clear to see :-D

    Thanks, great tip on the Astrantias. I’m not a huge rose fan but it’s the colour that would attract me to them and I can see when you have taken to wedgewood rose and the apricot ones.

    Oops… I’ll need to redirect some butterflies back over the Forth to you ;-) Happy GBBD, Angie :-D

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    1. Glad you appreciated the Astrantia tip, it really does work. Please do send some of those butterflies south ward!

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  6. Oh, Angie! Your garden is going gangbusters! (Do you use that expression in Scotland?) I'm mightily impressed. Everything looks great. Misty and damp is clearly a more hospitable setting for plants than hot and dry. The condition of my Shasta daisies alone is proof of the comparison - I didn't think anything could kill Shasta daisies but, right now, they look like toast.

    I can see why you love that rose-salvia combination. Now you have me wondering where I could place a peach or apricot-colored rose in my drought-stricken garden. Happy GBBD!

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    1. Gangbusters is not a phrase we would use - 'going it's dinger' means similar I think.
      I hope your Shastas manage to survive. It's the wet that does for them here.
      Good luck if you decide to choose a rose - there's lots out there!

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  7. I really enjoyed your Sedums--especially the pairing with the Heucheras. Lovely! We have Red Admiral butterflies, too. It's nice to learn of butterfly species that we share. :) Nice of you to grow the Fuchsias for your mum. I am a fan, myself, and the hummingbirds love them!

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    1. The pairing of the Heuchera/Sedum was an experiment last year and I'm please it worked out. I do though have to keep dead heading the Heuchera or else it looses the look!
      I hadn't notice before just how much the bees love the Fuchsias too. I always thought their flowers too fiddely for them.

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  8. I was just admiring the Rosa Princess Alexandra of Kent and pink fuchsia. They are so pretty and sweet :-) What a wonderful and great garden you have!!

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    1. Thanks for your lovely comments Stephanie - I always associate pink in the garden looks sweet :)

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  10. Lovely to get the update on your garden, Angie. You have so many beautiful plants, all doing really well too. I can see why you don't have so much time for blogging. That red rhododendron looks like mine, but I have only ever had one flowering a year; do you have to feed it to achieve that?
    Glad you have finally got some butterflies - my garden is empty of them again, despite a dwarf buddleia finally coming into flower. Maybe when the sun comes out again they will emerge.
    Just waiting for some drier weather to get going in the garden again - thanks for the inspiration.

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    1. Annette - I seem to be chasing my backside lately and am missing out on so much in blog land. I jump back in whenever I can but trying to catch up on older posts is just not practical.
      I'm hoping the butterflies hang around a bit longer and as you say, a bit more sun might just bring them back.
      Like you I'm waiting for it to dry up - my grass growing at an extraordinary rate! Glad you found some inspiration.

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  11. Apologies for mis-post earlier Angie, your garden is not only full of colour but still full of interesting plants. I have never even heard of the Heptacodium so will have to do some research. My Kirengeshoma is at about the same stage as yours but many of the central leaves have been shredded by slugs, funnily enough the Digitalis x mertonensis finished about six weeks ago.

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    1. Do look up the Heptacodium Rick - it's a lovely plant. My local nursery grows it in their woodland garden where it makes a lovely sight at this time of the year.
      My other Digitalis x mertonensis had finished flowering but I noticed this morning it's sending up another flowering stem.

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  12. WOW!
    All looking fab Angie... late summer lushness in abundance.

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  13. You still have a great deal in bloom. Your roses are particularly impressive. So are your cyclamens. I wish cyclamens liked our place a bit better. They bloom but timidly.
    I would like to try Kirengeshoma but they are supposed to like acidic soil and we are alkaline so it would mean a lot more work preparing a place for them.

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    1. I'm quite impressed with how much I've got in bloom too Alain. A shame the cyclamens don't thrive with you - they are a lovely addition to any garden at this time of the year.
      The Kierengeshoma is supposed to like Acid conditions - this one isn't the healthiest of specimens - every other acid lover does well here but not this. I've been trying to compensate by giving it a feed but that's not helping either. I intend to try it in a bit more shade to see if that does the trick. Good luck if you decide to give it a go - it will be a lot of work given your conditions.

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  14. I’m sorry the Indian Summer didn’t get established in Scotland, it has been firmly in place for weeks down here and still is, only interrupted today with the first rain in more than 3 weeks – and what rain we had, buckets at the time with thunder and lightning too! My rhododendron Dopey also re-blooms every year, but usually in August, nice :-)

    I have ordered from Crocus many times before, they almost always have up to 3-4 days delivery, and will send everything in one go so if you buy one item with ‘delivery within 3 days’ and another item with delivery ‘within 3 weeks’ – your delivery will take at least 3 weeks. If you want speedy bulb delivery for a nice price, use eurobulbs.co.uk, they also sell most of their bulbs in the green in the spring, including crocuses, which is very nice as sometimes you can’t get to the right place to plant the crocuses in the autumn because the beds are filled with plants all autumn.

    Sorry to hear I am not the only one having a Ville de Lyon with a fungus problem, mine is already growing back like mad after having been chopped to the ground 6 weeks ago, already taller than me and with lots of buds, I think it will flower again, but like you I am considering replacing it with something else. I have had mine for 10 years.

    Your roses look fabulous, all of them, and I am so glad the fuchsias are looking so splendid, they certainly feel at home in your garden, that’s easy to see!

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    1. You hit the nail on the head re planting in autumn Helene - I often over come this by bringing them on in pots and planting out come spring time. It does help get the positioning right. Bulbs arrived safe and sound after an email from me prompting them. I wonder if the first lot got lost on their way here (not RM, I'm glad to say).

      I'm please you like the Fuchsias and as you can see they've been getting pampered. I am going to bring them into the house for winter I'd hate to loose them after putting so much effort into them for mum. Of course, all thanks too you.

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  15. I'm in love ... "the Lark Ascending' - name colour all gorgeous. deffo on my wish list ... I may have to buy it NOW !!

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    1. Jane - it's a beautiful rose. Worthwhile trying to source it if you can. I guarantee you will not be disappointed.

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  16. It's still looking so beautiful Angie, so much colour. When you cut back the astrantias is it just the old flowers or the foliage as well? I read it should be the latter, but I always worry about the resulting big gap in the border. I really must get 'The Lark Ascending' it's fabulous, form and colour.

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    1. Thanks Jessica - when I cut back the astrantia I take it right to the floor. The give it a great bit soak. You are o fcourse right about having a bit of a gap but I have plants surrounding it that compensates and the new foliage starts to reappear after a couple of days. It really does depend on whether or not you can live with that gap. I tend to live with it just so I can have more blooms later.

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  17. Hi Angie - sorry I'm late! Your post has just come through to me (again!). Your garden is looking great! So much in flower, and full of colour. Your colour combinations are lovely - well thought out! Your roses, as well, looking good! Yes, I am interested in you Heptacodium. I adore scented shrubs, and a climber too, so it's really caught my attention. Can't say I know that one! Time to investigate!

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    1. I often have the problem of not getting updated on some posts, I have no idea why it happens. One of those unsolvable glitches I suppose :)
      The Heptacodium is a lovely shrub - it's said to prefer acid conditions but I've read online that it tolerates any soil type. I had a feeling you'd get inquisitive - knowing how much you like your scented shrubs.

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  18. So many lovely things in bloom Angie. Sorry to be so late commenting, I read your post and promptly dashed into the garden to see if my Heptacodium and Kierengeshoma were out yet. They are not I' m afraid. I can' t think why not, I am so far south of you. Anyway, I just realised that I hadn' t left a comment.
    There is so much to love in your garden; all your lovely roses, Wedgewood is such a lovely delicate colour. I love that gorgeous Salvia.
    You are so good at colour combining. All your lovely sedums are planted with companions that really set them off. I love them with the heucheras but that Persicaria, grass and sedum combination is a winner too.
    You plant your garden with an artist' s eye.

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    1. Nice to meet another gardener here with a Heptacodium Chloris - there are not many of us about :)
      The one growing in my local nursery isn't flowering yet either. Mines always flowers before theirs - he gets quite jealous as his blooms are often caught by the first frosts.
      Thanks for the lovely compliments - they truly are appreciated.

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  19. wow Angie you have such a lot going on in your garden, I don't know where to start, the roses are lovely and the new area at the back has grown really well and looks as if it has been like that forever, I like the foxglove with the purple foliage, and the rudbeckia and kniphofia, Frances

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    1. Thanks Frances, I'm truly pleased with the garden this year - especially now that the shrubs are maturing and some areas don't look so bare.
      I can't take credit for the foxglove planting scheme - it was more by accident, as some of them often are!

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  20. So much going on in your garden! I love the sunflower with the Helenium, and I can understand why you have fallen in love with your yellow and apricot roses.

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    1. Jason, the trouble is I often fall in love with plants then go a bit over the top! I do hope I don't fall out of love with the roses, as I have done with other plants in the past.

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    2. But if you do fall out of love think of all the new plants you can try.

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  21. So many fabulous blooms Angie and a great update post! I really love 'The Lark Ascending' it's so pretty and the name is terrific!

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    1. Thanks Paula - I had not been aware of the music The Lark Ascending until I was pointed in the right direction. Classical music is not usually my style but the piece of music is lovely. It's on You Tube if you don't know it.

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  22. You always manage to give us a fantastic blast of colour from your garden Angie. Kerria, the very first shrub which we ordered online from a company named Hortico. The shrub was little more than a rooted cutting, I grew it on, flowered two years later and I was totally unimpressed. I was surprised to see one here starting to bloom in the month of February.

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    1. I wonder if your Kerria will flower early each year or if it was due to the mild winter this year Alistair. I doubt I could ever be impressed with it since it's such a pest here. As are many of her plants!
      Thanks for the compliments. I hope all is going well in your garden too. I've just noticed I've missed your post, I will pop over now for a wee read.

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  23. I can not get over how much is still blooming and how green your garden still is...and the roses are gorgeous.

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  24. So many beautiful combinations Angie, I lvoe all the pinks and purples, but that rubekia with the cotinus behind is fantastic too! I really must try to remember to cut back my astrantias more often, I mostly forget, though this year they just seem to have carried on flowering regardless.

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