Monday, 18 August 2014

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day August 2014

I thought for a wee change I'd start by sharing with you a little area in my garden that I've never shown before.  This wee border came out of necessity rather than planning.  Have over purchased in the shade loving shrub department more than once, will I ever learn?  I doubt it!  I lifted a row of 3 x 2 slabs round the back of the house and over the years it's kind of become a shade lovers plonking ground.  I've also found it is the perfect spot in the garden to keep poorly Heuchera, they seem to thrive round here and as you can see last years invalids are doing remarkably well and are flowering now.

left to right: Heuchera Black Beauty, Caramel and Marmalade
and on the other side of the path, 3 more fully recovered Heuchera Caramel, albeit less floriferous.  This part of the garden is never used, it's mainly the thoroughfare between me and next door.  I legally have to allow them access to my side path but they never use it, except to pop over for a blether.      


and more!


The late flowering Clematis are now blooming.  Does anyone remember the Clematis I moved in springtime?  The one with the humongous root ball that caused me to have a high blood pressure reading at the docs a couple of hours later.  As you can see in the large picture, it has done remarkably well, reaching up and along the trellis.  I'm so glad I took that risk now.  It looks great meandering it's way along the top.

C. Princess Diana, Macropetala, Mme Julia Correvon, Rhapsody and Ville de Lyon
In the sunny bed outside the back door, many plants are looking rather tired, I commented last month that this border is in need of thinning out.  My autumn preparations have began and I have widened a small part of it and it's ready for some new occupants.  One of those new occupants is a white rose.  I wanted a pure white rose and chose R. Susan Williams-Ellis.  Trying out the bed for size, with her soon to be neighbours.

Phlox paniculata Violet Flame, Lonicera Fragrant Cloud and Rosa Susan Williams-Ellis
In the same bed, the seed heads of Clematis The Vagabond look every bit as interesting as the blooms. There is an Escallonia iveyi struggling to flower beneath the mass of Clematis foliage.  Another issue that needs addressing come autumn.  Does anyone clip back their Clematis by half in autumn, does it spur on new growth?  I'm thinking I would be doing the Escallonia a favour, giving it a bit of breathing space, so to speak.  It can't be happy under there.  I suspect it's almost bald under there!
Allium sphaerocephalon, Veronicastum virginicum roseum Pink Glow,
Monarda Croftway Pink and Leucanthemum Broadway Lights
Across the way on the shadier side, my teeny tiny wildlife pond is covered with pond weed and certainly about the only thing that thrives there!  Mainly with foliage interest, Kirengeshoma palmata is just coming into flower and the Cotinus is now of reasonable size that it's producing a bit too much shade for the Stachys under planted there, it is said to take a bit of shade but it's now reaching out for light.  This plant will benefit from a move over to the sunnier side in autumn.  Another plant that is loved by the bees and copes much better with the growing conditions in my garden that it's cousin Stachys byzantina.
Kirengeshoma palmata and Stachys officinalis Wisley White
There isn't much else going on in this bed, it's predominantly filled with Astrantia and having had a chop back a couple of weeks ago, are now putting on new leaf and they will flower again before they die back for winter.  A couple of Heuchera and a Hosta are blooming this bloom day.
Heuchera Paris, Hosta So Sweet and Heuchera Marmalade
As we go through the arch into the back garden proper the pot of trailing Begonias are still flowering away, granted at bit windswept and interesting.  I've grown rather fond of these and might give some more a go next year.  They certainly add a splash of colour where there is little else in flower.

 
The top bed, which is the subject of my EMOV, Persicaria overload, just about describes it.  I used the Persicaria to fill the gaps between the shrubs.  They like it there, as you can clearly see!

Persicaria amplexicaulis JS Caliente

Yet more Persicaria, along with Crocosmia Lucifer and Helenium Moerheim Beauty providing for the pollinators.  Interestingly I've seen very few butterflies.  With the perfect summer last year and the even more perfect summer this year, I would have thought they'd be about in their droves this year.  Alas, this is not the case.


I'm surprised that Helianthus Lemon Queen is shy at flowering.  You can see the Cardoon and Verbena are not so coy.  I wonder if I expect too much from them in their first year.  The recent high winds had me a bit concerned but all is good and still vertical! 

Heading back down towards the house, Persicaria Red Dragon, is making a bid to out grow everything round about it.  It's flowers are like the Helianthus are rather sparse.

Persicaria microcephala Red Dragon

If we head down the side path towards the front garden, in the side garden, which is predominantly a spring/early summer border, the Cyclamen are sprouting here and there. Bought and planted in flower last year, I'm glad to see their return.  Nestled in amongst some ferns, they brighten up this wee spot.

Cyclamen hederifolium
Out into the front garden, last year's gap fillers made a return.  I had formed no attachment to these plants, knowing that I'd probably never see them again.  It's nice that they have returned.  Sadly, they will not fit in with my plans for the front garden come autumn time.  Speaking of autumn, can you see the peony foliage taking on some autumn colour.  Where has the year gone?
      
Scabious Beaugolais Bonnets 
 
Rudbeckia
On the other hand, three plants flowering now that will fit in with my plans are a couple of Crocosmia and a dwarf daylily.  The Crocosmia were corms given to me last year by a friend.  The yellow is C. George Davidson and the bi-coloured one was supposed to be C. Emily Mckenzie but obviously not!  I like it and it has a reprieve for now.  The Daylily is one I've had for many years and long lost the label.  It's a dwarf evergreen, so there's every possibility that it's H. Stella D'oro.


Well that's about my lot this bloom day.  I'm joining with other garden bloggers over at May Dream Gardens that are sharing what's flowering in their gardens in the middle of each month.  See you there!

37 comments:

  1. I must get to the bottom of why heucheras just don't 'do' for me. Perhaps I need a shade lovers' plonking ground! Love the cardoon, what a statement!

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    1. Jessica, I wonder if it's too dry for the Heuchera, they do prefer a situation that doesn't dry out. I love the Cardoon too. I wouldn't be without it.

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  2. Your garden is growing so well, the red leaves of the Persicaria microcephala ´Red dragon´ are beautiful and of course the Cardoon is a stunning focal point in the garden.

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    1. Janneke, the red leaves of the Persicaria are wonderful, especially against silvery foliage. It really makes them stand out. Glad you like the Cardoon too.

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  3. Hi Angie, your garden looks so beautiful in the middle of August! I love the huge the variety of plants that you are growing. There are so many interesting plants and beautiful flowers to admire at this time of the year in your yard, it is just awesome!
    I have to admit, that I envy you a little that you can grow heucheras so well. I love these plants very much, but in my garden they decline after a while and need to be replaced by new plants. If I want to grow them I have to treat them almost like an annual.
    As a rose lover I am pleased to see that you go a new one! I am eyeing 'Susan Williams-Ellis' for quite a while now myself, but holding back since I have still roses to plant that are sitting in my pot ghetto. I hope this rose will do well for you. I think combining it with the violet phlox and the crimson/white lonicera is a great idea. Wishing you a nice week! Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. Christina, I've lots of plants still sitting in limbo. I really must do something with them soon. I don't want the hassle of keeping them over winter as I don't have much room in my wee cold frame.
      Susan Williams Ellis is a pretty rose, glad you like it too. A nice scent too boot.
      I can understand why the Heuchera don't do well with you, it's a shame because they do add something a border. There are so many plants we need to treat as annuals here, the winter wet usually finishes them off!

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  4. So much going on in August Angie - you have planted well to achieve so much at a time when it can be a bit quiet.

    I was relieved to read that your Helianthus Lemon Queen as mine has been too. It's grown massively and I can see buds, but they aren't coming out. Maybe the recent cooler weather is affecting them? Let's hope for a return of more sun so they flower.

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    1. Phew, I thought it was something I did wrong with the Lemon Queen. I don't feel so bad about it now I know I'm not alone. I think you are right re the cooler weather. It's turned pretty cold up here. We shall see what happens in a couple of weeks. Hopefully they will be flowering well for my EOMV.

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  5. Every time I see beautiful Heuchera like yours, I miss it in my own garden. The fancy hybrid types do well for one season here and then shrivel up in our heat, never to be seen again (at least not in a form you'd like to see them). Perhaps I also need to try them in deeper shade. The bed with the Leucanthemum and the Monarda is absolutely perfect - I so wish I could grow Monarda here!

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    1. Kris, maybe more shade but perhaps if you can source moisture retaining gel to use at time of planting it might give them a better chance. Thanks for liking the Leucanthemum and Monarda combo. Whilst I love the Monarda, it suffers greatly with powdery mildew and I've already got rid of some that were a right eyesore. These pink ones have their cards marked!

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  6. I've been looking out for a white climbing rose and chose White Cloud which us doing well. I'll have to try cutting back astrantia next year - when do you do it?

    One of the cardoons on our plot is flat - it happens every year even without gales, The other ius still standing proud.

    As for clematis I think it depends which pruning category it belongs to bit I wouldn't imagine reducing the size would hurt it.

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    1. I just had a google for White Cloud Sue, it's a beauty isn't it. I cut back my Astrantia just as the flowers start going over, which is dependent on our weather here. I cut them right down to the ground and by 2 weeks they foliage is all renewed and a further fortnight after that I get new flowers. All mine are now coming into bloom for a second time now. I think you are right re the Clematis. I just wanted to run it by someone just in case it was a no no. Such a shame about your Cardoon, when mine was in a shadier spot it flowered so late that come September the winds always did some damage. Good luck with the Astrantia next year.

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  7. You have so much of interest in your garden, Angie. Your Rudbeckia are looking great - I managed to bury mine at the back of the border and you can't even see them. Will have to do some serious rethinking soon. I hate taking plants out, but I think some things will have to go - I wonder when the Autumn plant sale is?

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    1. Do you manage to get the Rudbeckia to come through a second year Annette? Interesting if you do. They don't normally here. Luckily mine are at the front of the border as I bought them last year in Morrisons in a sorry state and just wanted to get them in the ground asap. For once taking a chance paid off!
      I'm at a similar stage, there are plants that need to go - I just need to be quite brutal and stop impulse buying! I'm not sure about the Autumn sales but the GCs down here already are stocked to the gunnels with spring bulbs! Thus far I've managed to refrain. Will be looking forward to seeing what you buy in the sales.

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    2. A dwarf Rudbeckia came again the second year as good as ever, even though I moved it. The larger plants at the back didn't flower the first year and only one of them has flowered the second year. I wonder if it will flower if I move it. I will have to risk it, though.

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  8. Hi Angie, your garden is looking to be full of colour, particularly impressed with 'Red Dragon', that is a must get. The heucheras are also working well 'Caramel' is one of my favourites.

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    1. Glad you like the Red Dragon Rick - it certainly does as it says on the tin. It should like the conditions in your garden too. I do like Caramel but really struggle to get it to pair nicely with growing partners. It's said to like full sun and I'm thinking it might go well in my front garden with my new apricot roses.

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  9. You have a great way of combining plants especially foliage, Angie. That shady corner looks great. Heucheras also do very well for me in the sun, depends on the variety maybe. Just adore that bed with the Persicaria - it's so subtle and beautiful. Our alliums and veronicastrum are over so enjoy yours while they last. Fab garden, well done :)

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    1. What a lovely thing to say Annette. I'd love to say the shady corner was planned but sadly not! Such a shame your alliums and veronicastrum are over already. One of the benefits of living here in Scotland is that we tend to get a bit longer out of our plants and it's generally the cold rather than the heat that finishes them off!

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  10. Your gardens are really lush and lovely. Glad weather has been accommodating for you. Love the Heuchera, they are definitely one of my favorite perennials.
    Cher

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    1. Thank you Cher, I like heuchera too although I tend to chop and change my opinion in them occassionally, especially when they are not doing so well.

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  11. Ciao Angie! È tutto bellissimo! Anche a me hanno dato una piccola Red Dragon da piantare :D

    Una domanda: Nella seconda immagine c'è un arbusto variegato dietro alle Heuchera. Che pianta è?

    Un saluto!

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    1. Grazie Pontos. La pianta dietro la Heuchera è Leucothoe fontanesiana Whitewater. Leucothoe sono amanti di acido e questo mi alleno a crescere come copertura recinzione.

      I hope the translate got that right :)

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  12. Everything looks beautiful and so healthy. I love all your Heucheras. Having so much foliage makes the garden look good all year round. I love Veronicastrum Fascination, it looks fabulous with the Monarda.
    I love Crocosmia, I suspect your imposter Emily Mckenzie could be a seed grown one. I think it is pretty. They don' t come true from seed but that is part of the fun of growing them. I am very fond of George Davison too. My favourites this year are Limpopo and Hellfire which is like Lucifer but better.
    A great selection of plants Angie. You' ve made me realise I need more foliage.

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    1. You could well be right re the self seeded Crocosmia Chloris. I must ask her for some more before the plants loose their flowers. Haven't heard of either Limpopo or Hellfire but having just googled, very nice!
      Is it a good or a bad thing that I've made you realise you need more foliage. Bad if it makes more work for you I suppose.

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  13. So many beautiful plants Angie, and they're all growing away together happily. I love your little shady border with the rescued Heucheras. The trailing Begonia is also gorgeous!

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    1. Thank you Paula. I'm rather fond of the Begonia too. My first time in trying them and am pleased with it.

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  14. There's plenty going on still - and doesn't it look gorgeous? I like Phlox paniculata 'Violet Flame' - I will certainly be adding that to my wish list and the Veronicastrum is a beauty too.

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    1. Thank you Sarah. Violet Flame flowers quite early and lasts well into autumn so worthwhile growing it.

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  15. Hi Angie,

    Lovely, and you seem to have far more of interest than I do... No fair. Nice to see you've got yourself a lovely Susan Williams-Ellis. I think I need to get out in the garden again and reconnect with it. I'm feeling somewhat detatched at the moment as I've barely spent any time outside for a couple of weeks now. There's probably plenty for me to tidy up!

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    1. I know what you mean about feeling detatched. There was a couple of weeks a while back that I could not bring myself to go out to the garden. Good luck on getting back out there and reaffirming your connection.

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  16. Marvelous. I am jealous of your late clematis, I may consider one of them for my tuteur for next year. I also love the Helenium and the cardoon. Here's a dumb question, is a cardoon the same as a thistle?

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  17. I remember both the clematis and the high blood pressure Angie - the former looks as if it responded well to treatment and I hope that the latter soon settled to a more even plateau and did not require any treatment. The shade lovers plonking border must be a treat for your neighbour to walk through. Have read a few favourable reports on your new rose - it sounds as if she is a gem.

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  18. Angie your garden still looking fantastic.

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  19. Hi Angie, how lovely to see your shade lovers plonking ground, I have one too! And Susan Williams-Ellis is a lovely rose, mine is in its third year and still quite small, probably because I grow it in a container in semi shade, but in my garden the plants are fighting for the sunny spots! I have cut down my clematises pruning group 3 a couple of times in August, usually because I had relaxed the fungus treatment too much and they no longer looked nice. I have done that this year too. The result has been varied, some years they grow and flower again, some not. I guess it depends on the weather during the autumn.
    I have also noticed very few butterflies this summer, there were many more last summer and you should think with the mild winter and good summer there would have been more.

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