Sunday, 31 August 2014

End of Month view August 2014

End of Month View July 2014

There is now a distinct chill in the air of an evening. Many of the plants around the garden are gearing up for autumn.  However, if the press are to be believed we are in for an Indian summer come September....roll on Monday then!  It's chucking it down here right now, early Friday evening.  We are experiencing a few more rain falls here and there and of that I am glad - keeping this new border and lawn adequately watered in it's first season has been a long slog!  Lack of water here in Scotland is certainly not the norm.  We are renowned the world over for our miserably wet summers.    


End of Month View August 2014
For this month's view I decided to take a couple of steps back and capture the entire area up there at the back of the garden.

Sorbus Autumn Spire
yellow berries
I wanted to include the Rowan tree in the shot.  New to the garden earlier in the year.  It should have been planted last autumn or at the lastest early spring but by the time I had made up my mind we were well into late spring, knocking on the door of early summer.  This year has been one of the driest I can remember, I've had to be very diligent when it came to watering.  I was doubtful of getting berries this year.  Although the Rowan flowered, the blossom didn't last very long, over in a matter of a day or two to be precise.   I had put this down to stress of me possibly not providing quite enough water.  I did up the watering considerably from then on in and it hasn't looked back.  You can just make out in the large image the little bunch of yellow berries.  I'm glad I chose this variety (S. Autumn Spire), I like the yellow berries way more than the red - it's nice to be different.  We've lots of Rowans growing nearby and all of them produce red/orange berries, I hope the birds appreciate something a wee bit different.

The new  lawn, although it doesn't show in the picture, I feel could do with a little pick me up - it's looking rather parched close up.  I'm not one for feeding lawn, lawns generally do just fine here on their own but only this morning, as I was mowing, I thought it was looking a bit miserable.  I've given it a general lawn feed and just hope I don't live to regret it.  Although the instruction said it can be used right up until September - it's at the back of my mind it's late in the year and don't particularly want growth to go into overdrive.  Mind you, it won't the the first time I've had to mow the lawn in winter.
        
There have been two minor changes since last month.  The first, was to do away with the Sambucus Black Lace on the back tier.  There had been a niggling doubt in the back of my mind at the time of planting - I was betwixt and between the Sambucus and the Physocarpus. The Sambucus won on the day of planting but the niggling doubt just didn't go.  I've now swapped it for the P. opulifolium Lady in Red - I like it far better than I did the Sambucus.  I think the reddish tones of the foliage fit better and the fact that it will grow no where near the massive  proportions of the Sambucus, is another plus.  I don't think you've seen this back tier since the early summer growth sprut of the perennials on the lower level.  You might be wondering what I've done with the Sambucus - it's found a new home in the neighbour's garden.


The Clematis montana Marjorie and Cotinus Golden Spirit have also settled into their new home well. Whilst the jury is still out on the Pyracantha as fence cover on the back fence, I have been tying in the growth from the clematis away from it but should I feel the urge to remove the firethorn if it gets out of hand, then it won't take too much effort to redirect some of the Clematis growth that way.

The contrasting difference I was hoping to achieve between the Sambucus and Cotinus is still achieved with it's substitute.  The observant amongst you will spot an out of place Verbascum.  Well not entirely out of place but certainly not reaching the 1.5m as promised on the label!  The Verbascum being raised a further foot higher than the perennials on the lower tier was supposed to make height that it would still be seen behind the taller perennials below.  What happened? Too much shade created by the other plants, I think.  I've been doing a bit of reading up on this plant and it is said to be more reliably perennial than other verbascums, if it returns next year, I'll find a new spot for it.  Verbascums generally don't do very well here in my garden but no point in making the effort now if it doesn't return next year, it can wait til spring and as you can see, the Hellebore is still flowering too.

The other change is not so apparent and came about when I got in a bit of tizzy regarding what might happen if we ever experience flooding again.  I lost so many plants a few years back that the risk of loosing my rather expensive Itoh hybrid Peony is one risk too many.  It's been replaced with a red flowering daylily and a new home found for the peony in the front garden.      
I would like to offer a public apology to the Lupins.  I've did nothing cut complain about them for the past 4 months or so.  Many of you liked them and some of you even when to the bother to suggest on what to do to help bring out the best in them.  My, how the tide has turned!  I'm growing rather fond of them - I'm not entirely sure why, I can't quite put my finger on why but it could be one of two reasons.  A.  The yellow of the Helianthus and the Blue of the Lupin go really well together or B.  Of the 3 plants, the two growing to the rear have been completely smothered by the larger one in front (proof that not all were dwarfs varieties either!) and rather than 3 different colours of lupin plants - a group of blooms in the same colour is making it much easier to the eye. It could of course be a combination of both reasons or neither but I've said it now and just for the record, I'll repeat myself......I like those Lupins!  

Another combo I think is still looking good and should continue for a while yet - Hydrangea paniculata, Crocosmia Lucifer, Persicaria JS Caliente, Helenium Moerheim Beauty and Sedum spectabile.  Nice autumn colour on the persicaria foliage too.  

We all like surprises, don't we?  I'd like to end this post with a couple of surprises, nice ones, I should add.

Back in November, when I was moving a honeysuckle that had been growing over the front panel of the shed, a stem with the tiniest piece of root detached itself from the root ball.  Thinking little off it, I stuck it in the ground and completely forgot all about it - I was taken a back when I spotted a single stem meandering it's way along the ground between the plants.  I untangled it and brought it out into the light and within a day or two, the sorry pathetic looking buds fattened and opened.  
Lonicera periclymenum Fragrant Cloud

Another wee surprise lurking around in the undergrowth is an Aster, just poking it's head out from beneath the Philadelphus.  Last time I had Asters in this part of the garden was before the flood.  That was back in 2012 - I hadn't noticed it last year.  Either the parent plant has recovered or it is a volunteer.  It will be nice to see what colour the blooms turn out to be.  


Thanks for reading and please join me over at the Patient Gardener's Weblog to see more End of Month Views from gardeners across the globe. 

31 comments:

  1. I'm in the process if choosing some perennials for a new bed and was frightened of Persicaria as it seemed really tall growing at the nursery. Your border is something like I am aimng for

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I had read about the Persicaria before I bought it, I never would have Sue! There are some awful stories out there about it. My local nursery grow this one in their woodland border and it's not too tall. I think at its' tallest it's around 1m in height. If you fancy giving it a go, let me know and I'll send you some down.

      Delete
  2. I'm a big lover of lupines and especially blue ones...mine are flowering again in the meadow and I am ecstatic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's nice when a plant blooms for a 2nd time isn't it. These bloomed well earlier in the year too, so 2nd time around for them too.

      Delete
  3. What a satisfying tour. It seems every thing is coming together and you have made many good choices, as well as adjustments, for your garden. I too love the lupins, but can't grow them here. Perhaps I will give your Fragrant Cloud Lonicera a try; it's a beauty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A shame you can't grow Lupins there Marian - they grow well here, providing the slugs and snails give them a chance! You'll like the Fragrant Cloud, nice dark foliage too.

      Delete
  4. I love good surprises in the garden. I once had a Clematis show up a few years after I thought it had died. I do think this area is looking just a tiny bit more parched than in the July picture. I complained in the past about my grass not looking as lush as yours. I gave mine a feed and it's looking much better now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Clematis are good at disappearing for a few years Alison - I always blame the slugs and snails!
      Glad to read that your grass is looking much better, there is hope for mine and it's good to read I'm not the only one that has fed a new lawn.

      Delete
  5. You know what really scares me, Angie? The growing speed with which this end of the month view is coming along!!! Gosh, is time really flying like this...as always I love your red border, it's just stunning. Your garden certainly doesn't suffer from late summer tiredness. You must be very pleased :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't let it scare you too much Annette ;) The border does look pretty full but there is plenty of growing room.
      The beauty of gardening here in Scotland is that the plants never really tire out from heat and tend to look lush for most of the year.

      Delete
  6. I rather like the yellow rowan berries too. They will make a really nice contrast to the reds in the border when they start to produce in numbers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, that was my plan Jessica......only kidding ;) I hadn't thought about that but thanks so much for pointing it out to me. Please don't be offended if I take credit for that thought :)

      Delete
  7. Your garden looks good all year round because you take such care to grow good foliage plants. I love Physocarpus; I have ' Diabolo' but your ' Lady in Red' looks wonderful too. I like your choice of Cotinus too.
    I love your yellow Rowan berries. I' m glad that you have changed your mind about your nice blue lupins.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought you'd be glad I'd changed my mind about those Lupins Chloris - you were one of their fans!
      I do like Lady in Red, another nice one is P. Burning Embers.
      I'm not so sure I take such care to grow foliage plants, it's not all been deliberate but nice of you to say so :)

      Delete
  8. Everything is looking great Angie. How lovely that your honeysuckle cutting has taken, it's always lovely to find a surprise plant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love it when somethings grows that don't expect it too - it always lifts my confidence somewhat.

      Delete
  9. Bellissimo come sempre! Soprattutto il sorbo è un tocco di classe! Complimenti!

    Un saluto!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grazie Pontos - Rowan sicuro è un vincitore!

      Delete
  10. Hi Angie,

    I have to chuckle re: Lupins... Sometimes that happens. One month/week/year to the next and our opinion changes. Sometimes it's just because it's something different to look at or, we have a no combo occurring as the year progresses and suddenly they look amazing!

    Love your Honeysuckle, I have the grand total of one bloom on mine this year! Woo hoo. I know that sounds sarcastic, but honestly I have such poor experience with Honeysuckle that actually I really am pleased! And I even got to sniff at it lol. Oh my life is so exciting!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Where are your gaps ? I see no gaps at all! It all looks just as perky as it did in June. Mine is all floppy and lethargic . I think I will go all retro and revisit the heathers and conifers of the 1970's to solve my problems !!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I hope you get your Indian Summer Angie, down here we are promised 24-25 degrees by middle of the week which means 2-3 degrees more in my garden – and next week doesn’t look too bad either.

    Your borders at the back of the garden looks really good, amazing how full and mature it looks already. I admire all the tweaking you do, I must admit I see a lot of things like that which I would like to move around in my garden too, but once a plant is planted it tends to either stay or get chucked in the bin as a last resort. However, I do intend to let a good few of my plants have a walk about this autumn, just need to get myself in gear for the job….not really there yet!

    And isn’t it lovely when the garden gives us surprises, you honeysuckle was a good one :-)

    ReplyDelete
  13. I really like black Sambucus but it will turn into a beast so it's replacement in your scheme with Physocarpus makes sense. I like it's contrast with the Pyracantha too. The garden is looking good and I like the broader view with the Rowan tree. Like you, I'm hoping for an Indian Summer for September. I'm just not ready for autumn yet!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nice surprises are always fun.
    Did your lupins bloom again or is it a photo form earlier? I have planted a lot of them near the house, outside the garden proper. I hope they start blooming next year.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Ah, how fun! Surprise flowers! Sounds like your summer has been more similar to the ones we usually have in the Midwest. This summer my town had near-perfect high temperatures (80F/27C), but it was a little dry (not uncommon here) in July. We had less than an inch of rain the whole month. Fortunately, August has brought us a few inches of rain. Your garden looks great, Angie! It's fun to see the month-to-month comparisons.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I can hardly imagine having a garden that looks so good at the end of August, Angie. It's so full and the plants look exuberant! My own garden is full of holes and I'm looking forward to cooler temperatures. Our summer hasn't been as bad (hot) as it usually is but it's still very warm and we're not expecting any significant rain until November, if we get it then. Here the talk is all about drought and water limitations, although I'm still hoping the weather forecasters will be wrong. I hope you get - and enjoy - your Indian summer!

    ReplyDelete
  17. A very beautiful garden Angie, a lustrous plants , lovely flowers :-))
    when it comes to gardening , you are gifted ! i am sure , you have a golden hands !
    climate over there is very good too :-)))

    ReplyDelete
  18. its me junna Angie

    ReplyDelete
  19. I'm sure your Lupins are feeling molified and well appreciated now. You don't want a sulky lupin. And wow - that's quite a Lonicera!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Amazing how it has all come together Angie, and I agree about the physocarpus. Glad I'm not the only one to have to change things around not long after planting thanks to a niggling sense of "not quite right"! I've come across the combination of persicaria and helenium in several gardens recently and really love it, adding in the crocosmia works beautifully, I may pinch that!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Love you colour combinations Angie, I am ashamed to say I gave up trying to do this ages ago, not an artistic bone in my body!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Angie, your comments about Scotland having a dry summer, not all of Scotland!! we seen to have opposite weather as when you had a wet summer I had a dry one, this year it is the reverse, would love to have sent you some of our rain,
    your garden always looks good to me, you make so many changes I can't keep up, nice to see plant (nice) surprises, Frances

    ReplyDelete

Your comments are appreciated. My blog is currently experiencing issues with some readers reporting problems when posting their comments. Please bear with me whilst I try to rectify the problem.
I have temporarily switched on word verification. I apologise for this, personally, I don't like it either, I am hoping this may help.