Thursday, 17 July 2014

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day July 2014

I've had a brief look back at what was flowering this time last year and to be honest there isn't really much difference - one noticeable difference is that plants that had just coming into bloom this time last year are well on their way this year and it leads me ponder what will be happening come September.  Still, no point in worrying about that now and even if the worse comes to the worse, there's nothing I can do about it.  I can't insist that Mother Nature puts the breaks on for a few weeks.  Not that I would want her to anyway, the sunny weather has been a treat.   worth from my new hose.  It's been well used already.

This was the sight that greeted me as I walked out the back door on Monday morning.  What had been the perfect mingle last year is this year verging on the over crowding, depending on your taste.  I don't mind it like this as it means very few weeds to deal with.  The sunny bed in the gravelled area out side the back door is a real treat at this time of the year.  As you will see there is a wide range of plants blooming this week. 


left to right:
Phlox paniculata Violet Flame, Hemerocallis Crimson Pirate and Erigeron Dunkelste Aller
Alstroemeria Inca Glow and Hemerocallis Crimson Pirate

left to right:
Hemerocallis Pink Damask, Rosa Rhapsody in Blue and Alstroemeria Inca Glow

Geranium psilostemon, Allium sphaerocephalon and Nepeta Dawn til Dusk 



Clematis The vagabond
 



Clematis viticella Mme Julia Correvon  



Nepeta grandiflora Blue Danube
 
One the shadier side of the gravelled area, I have had to take the shears to some Astrantia.  They were on the verge border domination.  I left a small amount of flowers purely for the benefit of the pollinators.  This is another border that is now in it's fourth year and will need a bit of a shuffle and possibly widening if I'm to continue growing the same amount of plants. 
 
Astrantia major Snow Star
 
Lupin Gallery Blue, Alchemilla mollis and Astrantia Snow Star
Before we pop through the arch to the back garden proper, the climbers I planted here in Springtime are slowly but surely making their vertical ascent.  It will be next year before I am able to appreciate the effect I'm trying to achieve.  Still, lets see what's flowering.
         
 
Both The Wedgewood Rose climbers are looking healthy but only one is producing blooms.  By my reckoning they both receive a similar amount of sunshine.  They were cut well back in spring before being moved to their new home.  I wonder if I might have caused more root damage on one than the other, this rose flowers right up to the end of the year, so plenty of time yet.  This rose has a wonderful fruity scent but if you get your nose right in the centre, there is no mistaking the scent of clove. 
 
DA The Wedgewood Rose


Honeysuckle, L. periclymenum Fragrant Cloud to give it it's full name, another with a wonderful scent is on the same section as the non flowering climbing rose.  My vision is to have the climbers reach the top of the trellis and cascade down over the other side. 
 

Lonicera periclymenum Fragrant Cloud
In the long border in the back garden proper, this is the border that is the focus of my end of month view, my favourite combo at the moment and one that has panned out exactly as I saw it in my mind when I planted it back in 2012. 
 
I just love the stature of the Ligularia, it looks great with the pure white of Astilbe Deutschland and the yellow is picked up by the stamens of the Philadelphus. 
 
Ligularia The Rocket and Astilbe Deutschland
Just out of shot to the left and in front of the Kilmarnock Willow (which has just began suffering from rust) is another Astilble, Astilbe japonica Red Sentinel.  Is said to prefer shade or part shade.  To be honest, it struggled in those conditions in my garden but since moving it into a full sun spot, it's looking the best it ever has.  Compared to the other Astilbes I grow, this one is quite short reaching a maximum height of 60cm.
 
Astilble japonica Red Sentinel, Persicaria JS Caliente and Primula florindae

As you can see neighbouring Persicaria and Himalayan Cowslips are just coming into bloom.  Further on up to the top end of this border, which is in a bit of a 'tweeny stage at present.  You know, when things have gone over and others aren't quite there yet.   Helenium Moerheim Beauty is just beginning to inject some late summer colour at the top end of the garden.  The large drift of these planted in spring, which all came from 3 plants that I divided up when I transplanted them, are shall we say, in your face.  Oddly though, they are far more verging on red than they've ever been before.  They do recommend dividing them every 3 or 4 years, perhaps I've rejuvenated them.  
 
Helenium Moerheim Beauty
As we walk back down towards the house, the opposite side of the garden, is a bit more shaded.  The border curves round the step of the decking.   The curved end receiving far more sun that the rest of the bed, is home to Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton.  My experimental planting scheme comprising of Rose along with a Sedum and Heuchera that compliments her bronzy coloured foliage hasn't quite gone as I had hoped.  Whilst all the plants are happy together, I'm not so keen on the Heuchera flowers drawing the eye from the beauty of Emma's blooms.  I'm tempted to snip of those flowers when the Sedum finally blossoms to see the effect it has, so watch this space come next bloom day post.  Everything else in this bed is in a bit of a guddle, due to the fact things were moved around to make way for the Laburnum in spring.  More Autumn work!
Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton, Sedum Red Globe and Heuchera Palace Purple 
Down in shady corner,  which despite the hot dry weather is still looking remarkably lush.  The different shapes, textures and shades of green courtesy of the Ferns, Hostas and Tiarella is only added to when blooms spring up here and there.   
    
left to right:
Primula capitata norverna, Primula vialii, Tiarella Spring Symphony and an unknown Hosta in flower this July Bloom Day
Just before we leave the back garden, the first flower on one of my Fuchsia has opened.  I received some Fuchsia cuttings from Helene over at Graphicality UK a while back.  Now, I'm not a particular fan of Fuchsia but my mother is and each year she asks me to grow some for her and each year I make some lame excuse to save me the effort.  Since I received the cuttings from Helene, which she was over the moon with by the way, she appeared home with another given to her by her friend.  See what you've started Helene!  Joking aside, they are all coming along nicely and have made great growth.  I should have more blooms over the next couple of weeks. 
 
Fuchsia Annabel
Sitting on the back step alongside the Fuchsia is a pot of what was meant to be Trailing Begonias?  They don't do much trailing in my opinion, more like semi upright with a dangly flower stem.  Somehow, I don't think the breeders would appreciate giving them such a non de plume.  I don't know what I've done wrong.  I've tried them in full sun, I've tried them in part shade.  Any ideas?  Or am I just being too impatient.
 
 
 
The side garden, which is predominantly a spring garden, Zantedeschia aethiopica and Hosta Frances Williams have bright white blooms right now.
 
 
I've deliberately omitted what's blooming in the front garden this post.  There are blooms but they are going to get a post all of their very own.  I've finally got a plan for the garden out front.  I'm quite excited about it and feel it deserves a stand alone post.
 
I'm late at posting this Bloom Day Post, for once I'm just not disorganised - The Garden Gremlins struck again!  I tripped over my own feet, fell full force into the whirligig, brought it crashing to the ground in two pieces, smashed my front tooth and knocked out a crown.  I've had other priorities this last couple of days!  All is well, teeth are fixed and new whirligig has been installed.  Thankfully, as my son and his GF are just back from their vacation in Cyprus with two suitcases full of dirty laundry.    I'll be over later to see what's been going on in all your gardens this July.

38 comments:

  1. Che spettacolo! Tutto bellissimo! Sono un poco geloso però , la ligularia non sono mai riuscito a trovarla e quella nepeta mi interessa molto :)
    Un saluto e grazie per queste bellissime immagini!

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    1. avete bisogno di venire impianto commerciale in Scozia Pontos. Grazie per le belle parole.

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  2. Hi Angie,

    Lots of pretty colours in your garden on this Bloom Day!

    I am admiring your photography skills as well :)

    Sorry to hear about your teeth, bet that was an expensive trip to the dentist (excuse the pun). As for your son, well make wash his own clothes or at least rope the GF into helping you out. They soiled them, they clean them, ha ha!

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    1. Thanks Adam. Glad you enjoyed. My photography skill isn't great, considering what other garden bloggers are capable off. I do get inspired by them though.
      Pleased to say, they did all the washing themselves!
      The trip to the dentist wasn't expensive as I thought it would be, phew!!

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  3. Hi Angie,

    Lovely photos, it's almost hard to believe that it's already nearing autumn - or is that just me being a little depressive?? Live in the present and all that!

    I know what you mean about your trailing plant looking very much un-trailing. That happens to me most of the time when buying bedding plants. In fact I'm shocked when they do indeed, trail.

    Hope your teeth are OK now? Ouchie. I suffered far too many years as a teen with various treatments, that I hope never to need anything doing to them again! Might explain why I'm now so meticulous to ensure as few visits as possible - at one point I had to go to the orthodontist every week.

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    1. Liz, I usually don't do bedding plants, mum persuaded me to buy them. She's getting too good at that now that I think about it!
      Yes, teeth all sorted and only one more trip back to the dentist next Thursday and that will be me for another 6 months. What a awful time you must have had off it. I'm sure I'd be the same.

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  4. Sorry to hear about your accident Angie. Ouch! Your front teeth how awful. Your garden is looking wonderful you must be so pleased with it, there is so much to enjoy. I have never seen Clematis Vagabond before, I shall look out for that.
    I hope you are enjoying the wonderful hot weather that we are getting at the moment.

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    1. Thanks Chloris, yes, my front teeth. Needless to say, I haven't been smiling much lately :)
      I bought The Vagabond at Gardening Scotland back in 2011 and it hasn't disappointed one single bit. I know others that grow it and tell me it's very dependable in their gardens too. Worth looking out for.
      Yes, the weather is wonderful, isn't it. I read that you are all having an incredible heat wave down there. Enjoy!

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  5. Now, Red Sentinel is an astilbe I could get excited about. Love the hot Helenium too. As usual your garden is looking fantastic Angie.

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    1. Jessica, it's a lovely Astilbe. Astilbes are one of those plants I would never have in the garden but I felt I should give them a go. I have 5 and 3 are going to the great big compost bin in the sky soon. Only Red sentinel and Deutschland are keepers.

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  6. While your garden is absolutely wonderful (what I wouldn't give to have a single Astrantia grow in my garden!), I'm sorry to hear the reason for your delay in posting. I hope there are no ill after-effects to deal with and that you continue to enjoy pleasant gardening weather!

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    1. Isn't it odd that we have some plants that grow happily in both our gardens Kris, yet others just can't handle our conditions.
      All's well with teeth and whirly, however, weather is rotten this weekend!

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  7. I hope you are OK Angie and not too sore. You will have to watch out for these Gremlins.
    The garden looks magnificent - such a wealth of plants - not too crowded for my taste.

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    1. All fine Alain. Those Gremlins can be little horrors. Thanks for the compliments and good to read that we have similar tastes.

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  8. Man you have a good taste, you are one passionate gardener and did a beautiful work designing all flowers and plants together isn't that easy job. I have been doing garden maintenance north shore since over 2 decades and I know how much patience and dedication you need to get this.

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    1. Thank you and thanks for visiting my blog. I've clicked on your link and I get an error message.

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  9. Oh dear Angie, hope you are all recovered from your skirmish with the whirligig!
    I always compare what you have currently blooming to what is out here and it is so interesting. You would think that we would be ahead as we are much further south, but that is not the case, and, in fact you have things like Phlox blooming, and even my 'non - Chelsea chopped' Phlox are still in bud. Like you, plants are further on than at this same time last year, due to fantastic weather.
    Love 'Anabel' what a dainty fuchsia she is ! Also love the 'Wedgewood rose' for that soft shell pink.

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    1. Glad to be able to laugh about it now Jane. The air was rather blue at the time! I think this phlox is an early one. Compared to others I used to grow it always flowered first. I've always been wary of doing the Chelsea chop here, I doubt we'd get enough sun to make it a success. The Rose is a lovely one and always produces lots of blooms.

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  10. I do wish plants wouldn't spread out so much - you just get beds right and you have to start all over again.

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  11. All your plants look really healthy Angie, strangely my phlox are also only just in bud even though I am much further south, perhaps your variety tends to be early. The Astilbes and Ligularia look great, I use both in my shaded garden but although the 'przewalskii' types like 'The Rocket' are OK my Ligularia dentata 'Desdemona' are almost always devastated by slugs, this year being no exception.

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    1. Thanks Rick. I do think this is an early one Rick. I also have Desdemona and Britte Marie Crawford and the slugs have not been kind to those here either. Pesky critters, eh!!

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  12. Oh dear, I hope your teeth are sorted and fine again, accidents like that can be costly – in many ways! Your garden looks lovely Angie, and I am so happy to see Annabel in flower. I also have the dilemma of whether to fill my beds so they look good now or in 10 years time – as you know I have opted for the ‘filled to the rafters’ look and I think that’s good for several reasons, one as you mention you get far less weeds, and also, you can get room for many more plants!
    Loved your alstromeria, that’s a plant I have yet to have in my garden, not sure why but there are still lots of plants I don’t have :-)

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    1. Costly, by the time I sum up the cost of dental work and a new whirly, costly just about covers it Helene!
      I'm no good at filling the beds to look good in 10 years time Helene. I'm way too impatient and much prefer to have more plants too.
      The Alstromeria struggles here unless it's very sunny and dry Helene. I've read that they don't lift and move very well and I really want to move it but it wasn't what you'd call cheap and am very hesitant in moving it.

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  13. Oh no! falling in the garden is so easily done, your poor teeth, hope you are fully recovered now. You have so many beautiful flowers out at the moment, your garden must be looking so pretty! Love your Wedgewood Rose, such a beautiful colour.

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    1. Thank you Pauline, I often have a wee fall on my backside moment and generally it's only my pride that's hurt but not this time!

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  14. Hi Angie, you have so many lovely blooms in your garden right now, I envy you a little bit, because mine is looking a quite bleak in the moment, which is always the case in the heat and drought of July. I don't know if the plants grow together in own spot in your garden but I love the row of photos of the hemerocallis 'Pink Damask', rosa 'Rhapsody in Blue' and alstroemeria 'Inca Glow'. I think it would be an unusual combination, but I feel it works so well! Another favorite combo of mine is the rose 'Lady Emma Hamilton' and heuchera 'Palace Purple'. In my climate the rose would get much bigger in the long run, so planting this heuchera in front of it would be just fine :-). Wishing you a nice weekend!
    Christina

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    1. Christina, the Hemerocallis, Rose and Alstroemeria are all in the same bed and they don't look too bad. I really do want to move the Alstroemeria but have heard they are fussy. Luckily it's not too hard on the eyes and therefore easy to live with. The rose being a wee bit away from them helps.
      Lady Emma is only in here 2nd year here so not quite as tall as she will eventually get. That might just help me out. Glad you liked it. Hope you have a good one too!

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  15. Poor you! Hope you (and the whirligig!) are all mended now. I have enjoyed reading your post and looking at all your beautiful photos, but one thing has leapt out at me. The other day, I was updating a photo journal I have for the garden, and noticed that my Helenium "Moorheim Beauty", which I suspected was redder than I remember from last year, was, in fact the case. Last year's photo was most definitely rusty orange. I have been pondering the same fact ever since. Mine, though, were last divided 2 years ago. I'm well and truly flummoxed!

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    1. I'm so glad I'm not the only one thinking that she is seeing things. I did the photo compare too and do notice the difference between the red and rusty orange. It may well be just down to the plain old weather!

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  16. Ouch, Angie, poor you! But wonderful colour in your garden, I particularly like the idea of being greeted by that first shot on walking out the back door.

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    1. Yes Janet, it is a lovely sight and I was really taken by it that morning as those daylilies sat in bud for weeks!

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  17. Your gardens are looking wonderful with so many blooms and wonderful colors to look at. Your Astilbe is sure looking great. You must have them in prime light.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. Thanks Cher, I'm really pleased with those Astilbes this year.

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  18. Aack - sorry about your tooth. Hope it wasn't too painful. I once chipped a tooth by hitting myself in the face with a plyers. How I managed that would require a live demonstration. I don't think that first bed is too crowded, I like the blue phlox with the red daylily. You've got a lot of nice combos, actually - the blue phlox with the red daylily, and the astilbe with the ligularia, to name a couple. Looks wonderful!

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  19. I enjoyed reading and watching the pictures of this magnificent post. I like gardens crowded with flowering plants and in your garden are some lovely combinations, p.e. the Heuchera and the rose Emma Hamilton, Astrantia Snow Star with the dark leaves, the Wedgewood rose is a jewel too. So many beautiful things.....

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  20. I enjoyed your July blooms Angie though I have had helenium 'Moerheim Beauty' on my wish list for a while and your photo has prompted my memory that I must seek one out. I am sorry to read about your encounter with the 'Garden Gremlins' which you could have no doubt done without. Hope that everything is ok now. I know that perfect mingle to overcrowding scenario all too well and unfortunately have much of the latter to tackle. Just wish that we could press a pause button at the perfect mingle stage :)

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  21. Hi Angie, your flowers are beautiful. I'm just stopping by to say how delightful your blog is. Thanks so much for sharing. I have recently found your blog and am now following you, and will visit often. Please stop by my blog and perhaps you would like to follow me also. Have a wonderful day. Hugs, Chris
    http://chelencarter-retiredandlovingit.blogspot.ca/

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