Wednesday, 2 July 2014

End of Month View June 2014

End of month view June 2014

End of Month View
May 2014 
Green!  Yes, that's the word that I think best describes this month's End of Month View.  The late summer flowering plants are gearing up.  This bed was always meant to be a predominantly a late summer border, the garish colours of the flowers look better at the top end of the garden. 

Presently colour/blooms come by way of Astilbes, Trollius and Lupins - The Astilbes have a few weeks left in them and the Lupins are perhaps on borrowed time unless they get a second wind.  I'm told, not checked though, that we are to get a rather wet weekend.  If that's the case, it might breathe a bit of new life into those Lupins.
I'm far happier with this border now that the bright pink peony has finished flowering.  That's on the list to be replaced in autumn.  With what, I'm not sure - there are a few contenders already in the garden.  The new Trollius, T. chinensis Golden Queen is presently at the top of the list.  You can make out the flowers just left of centre.   The cardoon has taken on epic proportions in the last 4 weeks - it's full to bursting with buds.  They are a long way off from flowering yet though.

On the top tier, the rambling rose on the back fence is flowering it's heart out.  I've been training this on wires, a sort of espalier if you like.  Whilst I'm pleased with my efforts, it's a shame that it can't be fully appreciated now it's stuck behind the shed.  My concerns leading up to it flowering was whether or not is would look out of place but that isn't the case.  An alternative site for it gives me yet another dilemma! Decisions, decisions, decisions!  Also growing on the fence a Pyracantha, has flowered and gone over since my last post - moving it here in spring without cutting it back, was not only difficult,  I worried that it might not flower.  I worried unnecessarily, it flowered beyond my expectation.  There should be masses of orange berries later in the year. 
 

Rose 'Félicité Perpétue'
The new patch of lawn is looking great, it has blended in with the older grass and is not so noticeable now.  I've been keeping myself busy by having to weed out all the stray seed that got blown into the border.  Just when I think I'm on top of it, more appears.  It will be much easier to deal with when the plants are dying back later in the year. 

Well, that's all for my End of Month View post for June.  If you want to join in or read more on what's been happening at the end of June elsewhere, pop over to The Patient Gardener's Weblog, there's lots more to see. 

34 comments:

  1. I'm pulling grass seedlings out of beds in my front garden too. They're growing better there than in the grass circle where they're supposed to be growing. I love my cardoons! Your bed here looks so full and lush, hard to believe (or remember) what it looked like at the beginning of the year.

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    1. Of course, we both sowed the seed at the same time. I'm feeling your pain Alison. I love my cardoon too - I started out with 3 individual plants then realised my garden was way too small to cater for 3. My brother and a friend were given the others to enjoy.

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  2. Hi Angie, your border is so much tidier than mine! And what a difference there is in gardens on opposite sides of the country - our astilbe has already gone over but the lupins are only just coming into their own now. Love your gorgeous rose. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks Elizabeth. Isn't it odd how plants behave differently on both coasts.
      Mature Lupin clumps are still flowering here but despite my watering they are not flowering very well.
      I'm replying on my phone at work but will pay a visit to your blog when I am on a larger screen.

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  3. Hi Angie, your border looks fabulous by the beginning of summer. I like quite a bit that it is predominantly green, very soothing for the eyes. The Cardoon is just doing amazing, it is hard to believe that the plant has add on so much size since May. Of course my favorite plant is your rose 'Félicité Perpétue'. What a charmer! Usually you come across on your blog as a very self-critical gardener but you seem to be quite happy with this border right now and rightly though :-)! Wishing you a nice rest of the week,
    Christina

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    1. I'm trying not to be so critical Christina. I've been given lots of advice about focusing on the positives and I must say, it feels so much better. I am much happier with things now. It's good of you to notice.
      That Rose is a pretty one, I like it too.

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  4. What a wonderful mixture of shapes and textures - your border is looking wonderful. That rose looks so healthy and vibrant too - you have done a great job training it on the fence.
    On a more technical note how do you do your images? It is great that when you click on one you get a slide show of all of them. I bet many people don't know that they can get that much better view of the images, especially the smaller ones. With my site unless I actually create a gallery that doesn't happen, but then I can't have the images throughout the post as well. I also find looking at the stats that people aren't bothering to click on the galleries very much and so are missing the best view of the photos. Oh I forgot you are blogspot rather than Wordpress - it might be different.

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    1. Thanks for the lovely comments Annette. Re the technical stuff.... I haven't a clue!
      I think the slideshow feature comes as standard with blogspot. I did no research when starting my blog, jumped in with two feet oblivious of what was out there. To be honest I tend to forget that feature is there unless the writer mentions it.
      Maybe asking for this feature on WordPress and encouraging others to do the same might push them to add it.

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  5. Your border looks wonderfully healthy and happy, Angie. I can understand your feelings about the discordant color note played by the peony but, if I could actually get a peony to bloom anywhere in my garden, it would be allowed to stay no matter what color clashes it produced. Your plants seem quite resilient. I'm impressed that your rose and Pyracantha bloomed so well despite being moved - my plants tend to sulk or, worse yet, fail when moved.

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    1. Thanks Kris. Maybe one day you'll have a paeony bloom in your garden. Does your shadier spots suffer as much as the rest of your garden. I manage to grow P. Sarah Bernhardt in shade and she copes with it.
      I'm quite strict in watering new or moved plants. I think that's why they cope so well. Don't forget Scotland's climate is generally cool and moist so it's not so harsh to the plants making a recovery.

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  6. Your garden looks really good. And so well tended. But green? You must have had some rain. Straw seems to be the predominant colour here.
    That is one of my favourite roses, it is always covered in bloom and it is so healthy.

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    1. Chloris we have had very little rain here so the garden is reliant on my providing it with water. It's my Sunday evening ritual. Up Here gardens generally don't take on such a parched look as those in the South. I hope yours gets a bit of moisture and greens up a bit for you.
      I do like that Rose too. When she flowers she really does flower! .

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  7. Hi Angie,

    I can't believe how mature your new section is already! It looks like it's been there years already; you've done wonderfully.

    Your rose is lovely too; I really need one here, preferably climbing over a lovely arbour/seat. I can dream :)

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    1. Liz, it's a pity you don't live nearer, you'd be welcome to come and help yourself to the arbor seat in the top picture. I've no where practical to put it now.
      Your lovely comments are much appreciated

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  8. Angie, it is looking so full and lovely. My lupins are all over and cut right down, so you are lucky still to have yours blooming. Trollius is a new one to me, is it a plant you would recommend ? I love your rambler and it is now on my wish list after seeing yours !

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    1. Jane, I grow 3 different Trollius and yes, I'd recommend them. My favourite is Trollius Cheddar. It's a lovely pale lemon colour. They don't like to dry out though so if you've the right spot, give it a go.
      She's a lovely DA rambler, the first Rose I ever bought.

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  9. You're garden is thriving! I love your climbing rose. I would also like to give Trollius a try, but I have to think about where to put it.

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  10. What a wonderful garden, it looks nice and very tidied :) I like it!

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  11. I want a white climbing rose for a fence but I want a single variety, It has to have perfume. not be too vigorous and not not be prone to blackspot. Trouble is I don't think such a rose exists! Oh and repeat flowering would be good!

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  12. It's hard to believe this is the same garden as three months ago, it has matured so fast! Well done, your hard work has really paid off.

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  13. Your garden sure is lush and very lovely. That Rose looks beautiful with all the blooms it has on it.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  14. Your border is looking really good and your plants are obviously happy. I love your rose on your fence, so pretty.

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  15. Your new area looks absolutely lovely Angie! And so established already – yes green is absolutely the colour, but there are many nice colours in your bed to break up the green. And your Félicité Perpétue' is a stunner, doing very well in that shape. It might grow mostly behind the shed right now, but in a few years time it might have spread much further and you could perhaps see it from any part of the garden :-)

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  16. Your garden looks very lush and growing beautifully. (Congratulations on getting all these French accents just right! Most people don't. I think Félicité and Perpétue were two martyrs).

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  17. Very lush indeed, and I like the contrasting textures and forms. Félicité et Perpétue is one of my favourites and so vigorous that she won't just stay in the assigned corner, you'll see ;)

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  18. It's all looking wonderful, Angie! You've trained the rose well, and it's looking great - so prolific! I love your cardoon. We had 3 in our "allotment" but I replaced them with artichokes instead - I wanted them on my pizza!

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  19. All looks rather spiffing to me. Bravo on a 'fantabulous' job well done! :-)

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  20. A wonderful combination of shapes and colours Angie, as you also showed in your previous post you must work really hard at it. It is not something I even attempt now as when I have tried it in the past it has always gone haywire. best laid plans.....................

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  21. Your garden looks wonderful Angie. Great combinations of plants.
    Have a wonderful sunday.

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  22. Your new part of the garden looks already very established, lovely green. That rambler is a beauty and you trained it in the right way.

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  23. Angie! È diventato veramente bellissimo! Complimenti! Prenderò sicuramente un bel po' di idee! :D Un saluto!

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  24. Angie, I can get to this post but when I try to open your most recent one it says 'This page does not exist'. Thought I would let you know.

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  25. Lots of groundwork led up to this moment, and then the WOW factor kicked in.

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  26. Angie I can't get over how much this garden has grown in a month..so lush and green.

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