Monday, 5 May 2014

Carried on regardless - the garden that is!

Despite me loosing my gardening mojo of late - the garden carried on regardless!  The early bloomers are long gone, most of the bulbs have now gone over and the vast majority of the shrubs are now fully clothed in their summer finery. 

Since my bloom day post the remainder of the Camellias have bloomed.  All bar one, which is not featured, was new in the garden 2011.  Their stature maybe small, their blooms sparse but they are all gorgeous nonetheless!


Clematis cartmanii Pixie is not fully hardy here in Scotland and generally takes a bit of a knock in winter.  Not this year, her almost Chartreuse colour flowers cascades over the edge of this large container.  The elderberry scent is just wonderful!  Pots of pansies and violas add some contrast.


In the side garden, Acers and Magnolia stellata are doing their thing right now.  The colour of the Acer is picked up in the flowers of the Primula, Dicenta and Lamium.


A complete 180° and we see Acer shirasawanum Aureum - fresh lime green leaves look equally good (I think) with the white of the Magnolia, Drumstick Primula and Narcissus Thalia.



Acer palmatum Orange Dream might still be tiny but packs a bit of a punch and really shows off Brunnera macrophylla Jack Frost's blue flowers.  Just out of shot a pink pulmonaria totally clashes and might need a bit of a rethink - I shall see what happens when both finish flowering.  The foliage might just work!


There's a bit of a sad tale that goes along with my Coral bark Maple, Acer palmatum Eddisbury.  In 2011 it was a gorgeous 5ft specimen that cost me quite a few pennies!  Come spring 2012 it had a severe infestation of  black aphids on the young growth.  I religiously cleared and squished as many as I possibly could.  It lost almost all it's foliage, then just as it was making a come back the wet summer of 2012 haunted me!  From Black Aphids to severe waterlogging in a matter of weeks - wouldn't you feel rather beat?  One by one the stems began turning black and drooping horribly.  I promptly lifted it from the ground and potted it into a 50/50 mix of Ericaceous compost and JI No.3.  I made the decision to cut off all bar one stem.  An experienced gardening friend did the 'gum suck' when I told her what I'd done and told me there was no hope of survival!  Ha! proved wrong she has been.  It may not be the beautiful specimen it once was but it's recovered and all new growth has been above the graft, which is good.  Moved from it's nursery bed when it was dormant, it has settled in well.

A new addition to my garden this spring - Abies koreana Silverlocke has produced some cones.  These will turn blue as they age (I hope) - I hope to pair it with some blue Hostas.  I've a few already in the garden, they will be moved in autumn. It feels good to be thinking so far ahead - I hope this means my mood is well and truly lifted.


Another conifer, completely on a different, much smaller scale - Bird's nest spruce, is a low growing spreader, I do love it's bright new growth.  It's rare for this shrub to produce cones - not that it matters, the new growth makes up for it.  The shocking pink Azalea behind just coming into flower.


My 'In your face' inherited Red Dwarf Rhododendron is blooming right on cue!  This one thrives on pure neglect.  It's never watered nor fed and really only catches your attention for a short couple of weeks in May.  It's almost three times as wide as it is tall but you can't tell from this picture - I can't get a head on shot due to narrowness of the path between plant and the house wall.


New to the garden last year, the fist time it has flowered - Berberis thunbergii Rose Glow.  I hadn't realised just how pretty the flowers are. 


Mexican orange - Choisya x dewitteana White Dazzler, is a bit of mouthfull don't you think?  Getting a bit cramped in there now - it's being smothered by it's neighbours.  This is a 'very' slow growing shrub and since I bought it in 2011 it's hardly grown at all.  I had expected it to be a bit taller by now - this may have to be rehomed in Autumn.


When it's balmy and warm in the early evening - the scent of Daffodils still hand in the air.  It won't be long until the Honeysuckle takes over but for now we make do with the few remaining daffs.



 
We need to get right down for a worms eye view of these pretty little woodlanders - Dicentra, Anemonella, Corydalis and Epimediums are putting on a fine show, if you can be bothered getting down for a closer look that is!  The fresh pastel shades are a lovely change to the 'in your face' yellows of early spring.




 
No longer known as Dicentra - let's be happy calling them Bleeding heart, Dicentra flows much easier from the tongue than Lamprocapnos in my opinion. 


I'm not keen on this combo - that might change when the Aruncus aethusfolius flowers.  The creamy white flowers should pick up the edging of the Ajuga leaf. 
  

The blue flower of the Ajuga might make the perfect partner for Primula denticulata Cashmieriena - they are currently planted a few feet apart and it wouldn't be too much bother to grow them together, something worth considering.  The drumstick Primula will go over just as the Polemonium Purple Rain flowers.


Remember my day out at the SRGC Dunblane Early Bulb show back in February, one of the gorgeous Primula I bought that day was already in flower - low and behold it has flowered again.  This one you may remember is supposed to smell of fish - the scent escapes me, phew!  I wish I had bought more!

My otherwise large clump of Solomon's Seal is somewhat depleted this year - why?  When I transplanted the Firethorn elsewhere in the garden, I inadvertently took some of this plant with me.  That will teach me for taking such a large rootball with it!  This is the parent plant - the other is now flowering in full sun position - it will be interesting to compare the difference and how they cope.


It's been a Bank Holiday this weekend here in the UK but where ever in the world you are, I hope you had a great weekend.   I was out in the garden but only to water and do a wee bit here and there but it's a step in the right direction. There will be more of what's blooming in my garden on Bloom Day - I felt that this post would bridge the gap between the end of April and the middle of May.  Thank you for reading!  

35 comments:

  1. I don' t know why you've lost your gardening mojo with so many wonderful things to enjoy in your garden. So many treasures I don' t know where to start. I adore the dainty Anemonella and that Primula is absolutely gorgeous.
    I do try to keep up with name changes but Lamprocapnos- oh dear. A new one on me.

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    1. I'm getting back to normal now Chloris, so am glad it didn't really last very long. Whatever the reason, it behind me now! I adore the Anemonella too - I've only today discovered a new seedling popped up - that's pleased me enourmously. I'd love it to spread itself around. The Primula is a cracker, isn't it. I do hope it's happy too. I think the name change was about 2 or 3 years ago and is just now catching on.

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  2. What a lot of gorgeous plantness Angie ! Dicentra will always be Dicentra to me I'm afraid !!
    I didn't realise Clematis 'Pixie' was a little tender, so thanks for that. I have Armandii and it is very tender, in fact I am now on my third one ... do I never learn !
    As usual, in your garden , there are so many careful and clever juxtapositions of plants.

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    1. Jane, you are speaking to an Armandii looser here! Mind you, I've only tried and failed twice, good luck on your third attempt. Maybe third time lucky - you never know.

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  3. You have oodles of beautiful plants going strong in your garden, Angie! I'd say your gardening year's off to a very good start.

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    1. I'm glad it has Kris - thanks for liking my plants, I do covet many of the things you are able to grow over there!

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    1. Thank you ever so much Anu - you've a very mouth watering Google + page :)

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  5. Some lovely flowers - you have quite a variety.

    We have carpets of magnolia and camelia petals at the moment and the malus profusion petals are also adding to the floor cover.

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    1. Ah, yes, the carpet of petals - the down side to such beautiful trees and shrubs. The Cherry trees nearby are now loosing their's and it won't be long until I'm in a similar position.

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  6. Such wonderful plants and beautiful photos. You have some lovely combos going on - you obviously have a good eye for colour. Shame you lost your "mojo" for a bit, but surely this display must restore it! Methinks you have more talent than you give yourself credit for! Did you mention a scented clematis? That's now on my wish list! And as for name changes, that one passed me by. It's still Dicentra to me!

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    1. What a lovely thing to say - it truly is appreciated. I do like my colours to match and do try hard to achieve something pleasing to the eye. I don't always get the plant selection right but the colours work!
      Yes, Clematis pixie is scented - it's a lovely one and you should be able to grow it no bother where you are.

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  7. Fantastic array of late Spring colour. I am particularly taken with your Primula calderiana subsps.calderiana which is not always easy to grow, it sounds as if you have the right spot for it and I would be interested to hear how you get on.

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    1. Thanks Rick. I had read it was a tricky one - I hope it likes it here. Apparently it's a difficult one to get to set seed, so I'm hoping it multiplies on it's own accord. I'll keep you informed of developments.

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  8. It reads as if your gardening mojo is returning Angie slowly but surely :) Your acer has made a good recovery and is a beauty. I'm with you on that name change too :)

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    1. Indeed it has Anna - I'm so pleased the Acer recovered, it was not cheap and would have been a costly lesson!

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  9. A lot to see in your garden Angie. I love your purple primula never heard or see it before.
    Have a wonderful evening and I hope you will find your mojo in short time.

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    1. Thank you Marijke - I had never heard of the Primula either, it was bought on a whim, knowing nothing about it. I do hope it's happy.

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  10. Ciao Angie, impressionante come è bella quella clematis! Non l'avevo mai vista!! Un saluto!

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    1. Grazie Pontos, hai ragione è una bella Clematis. Mi chiedo perché non l'avete visto laggiù.

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  11. Your Epimediums and blue corydalis are gorgeous, so are your various Acers. The Clematis ´Pixie´ is a gem, and I have never seen this one before. With so many beautiful plants in your garden your certainly must get your gardening mojo back.

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    1. It's slowly coming back Janneke - only this afternoon was I sitting enjoying what was going on around me and now that my grass has germinated, it looks really good. I love the Epimediums and Corydalis too. So pretty at this time of the year.

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  12. I must say your garden in exceptional...Angie take heart in knowing your garden is growing beautifully because of all the care from year's before...it will continue on and wait for you when you are ready...it is always good to take a break when we need it....

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    1. Thank you ever so much for those encouraging words Donna - I do appreciate them. As I said above, I was feeling great about the garden this afternoon. I'm kind of glad I took a wee break, it's made me appreciate it now.

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  13. Hi Angie,

    There's no harm in taking a break from the garden. I do often. I guess some would say I'm a lazy gardener, but then I see myself more as being someone who enjoys being outside and spends most of their time lazing on the grass, reading, listening to music or day dreaming. I also like taking photographs and like flowers. I don't honestly see myself as a gardener. More a photographer who likes flowers. I haven't mown the lawn for a couple of weeks now, it will cause no harm other than to my ego should anyone see it... but no one will, so it doesn't matter :)
    Weeds are beautiful in their own right, leave them be. Don't worry about it. Even their seeds are often gorgeous too (perhaps don't leave many though...) Dandelions are great for wildlife - just remove the clocks before they open. Relax, enjoy your garden. Do as you please, when you please.

    Do as much standing and staring as you wish; the garden will still be there, and it'll still be as beautiful.

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  14. Ohh, your camellias are all gorgeous Angie, love the pink and white one! Is it called just ‘Lady’ or something more? I have never tried taking a cutting of a camellia, have you? I thought I would try this year, just to see if I succeed, I have heard it is more difficult than a lot of other plants. I have plenty of material on my huge camellia so I can have a go many times, to hone my skills :-)
    How lovely to see your new conifer, it has lovely cones, wish I had room for one! And I agree with you, why did they have to change the name in Dicentra spectabilis?!
    Your garden looks lovely, thanks for the tour, glad to hear your garden mojo is back, not easy if it is misplaced and you can't find it :-)

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  15. Looks like a lovely spring in your garden.

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  16. Your garden seems to have done quite well despite the neglect. I love those drumstick primula - thought they were alliums at first.

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  17. I'm glad you're feeling a bit better. The garden is still looking amazing with an array of more plants I 'need'. :-)

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  18. I have just returned from a holiday in Scotland. We visited a number of gardens filled with beautiful azaleas, camelias, rhododendrons, acers and heathers. Inspirational! I wanted to get home and create a rock garden. You live in a beautiful place.

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  19. We all go through those periods of ennui, but your garden seems none the worse for it.

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  20. Your plants look fab, Spring brings such nice colours to the garden. Your photographer is very good too!

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  21. I meant to say your photography is great!

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  22. Your gardens are full and abundant already and looking lovely. Glad your Coral Bark is doing well, it is such a lovely Jap Maple.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  23. Yes, things are definitely carrying on in your garden! I hadn't heard about the name change for bleeding heart. I liked Dicentra better, too. Your camellias are gorgeous!

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