Friday, 15 November 2013

November 2013 Bloom Day

It wasn't until yesterday that it dawned on my that bloom day was approaching - luckily I had been taking pictures all week, I don't have to trawl through lots of images - I had already sorted out the better ones.  It's difficult to get decent pictures at this time of the year - the lack of light really affects how they look and they never look quite the same using the flash.  

I am running the risk of sounding like a broken record by saying how great our weather has been but there you have it, I've said it again!  I does seem wrong somehow to be expressing how pleased I am with it following recent events in a country that is so dear to my heart.

Come October/November time we have usually had our first flurries of snow and more than our fair share of frosts but not this year.  There has been no snow and only a couple of mornings that temperatures have dropped.  Up until Saturday, last, a minor frost was all we had experience. The frost on Saturday however lasted the whole day and brought many things to their knees.  Sunday was  spent clearing heaps of mush - it was garden bin day yesterday so I wanted to clear out as much as I could.  Very few deciduous shrubs have dropped their leaves yet, I hope they hang around a little longer - it would be nice if they could join in Foliage Follow Up.

For the first time in my garden I have Mahonia flowers - planted in the Autumn of 2011, it's taken a while but finally got there.  The promised scent?????  I can't smell a thing!
Mahonia x media Charity
The frost has barely touched this Astrantia - it has now been flowering since the end of May.  Apart from the 2 weeks it took to recover from being cut right back - I reckon that's not too bad in terms of flowering value.  It's name, rather apt for the time of the year - Astrantia 'Snow Star'.
Astrantia Snow Star
I've tried out Sedum in a shadier part of the garden - I do like the look of Sedum and Heuchera growing together, it has flowered later than the others that grow elsewhere in the garden.  We shall see how it copes with winter in that spot! 


I bought a tray of plug Chrysanthemum late summer 2012 - I know not what possessed me to buy them in this colour!  I must of had a plan but it was so long ago I can't remember what my intentions were.   They add a bit of cheer so for now they have a reprieve.     

A single plug

3 plugs
They had no winter protection last year, I'm not sure if they need it or not but do I need to cut them back at some point? - there is new growth at the base.  The reason I ask is that the larger of the pots is filled with dwarf daffs and left like this I'll never see them! 

The Wedgewood Rose - I'm sure the frost will have done for those buds!  This rose has featured in every bloom day post since June. 



A lingering flower remains on Astilbe Red Sentinel


There are of course some plants that just don't read the gardening books and irrespective of the time of year will want to throw up an odd flower or two.

Cirsium rivulare - 3rd time flowering this year.  This year I've learned a lot about the way some of my perennials grow and flower.  It just goes to show if you can live with the scruffy look or a gap in the border for a week or two then it's worthwhile chopping them back so the garden benefits from a second flush of flowers.  I doubt these flowers will ever open but they look equally nice in bud.
Cirsium rivulare

A drop in temperatures and a bit more moisture in the air revived Primula Francisca. 


I couldn't resist this cheeky little shot - had it not been for the wind the other night, there would have been Gladioli in bloom for this November post.  Sadly that was not to be! 

Now Pansies are usually not my thing - I was out shopping for a specific sized container in which to grow some species Narcissus - I was gifted a rather nice pot but as it has no drainage holes I needed on that would slot in.  The only suitable one I could find was sold complete with Pansies already in flower.  Rather than dispose of them I've decided to give them a go in the front garden.


I've also found a little self seeded one growing up through the Cotoneaster.  The flowers really are tiny, the Cotoneaster berries are bigger!  I haven't the heart to pull it out.  Some slug will be grateful for the feed!


Lastly for this bloom day is a pretty little Saxifraga I bought last week.  I say with all good intentions that last weekend's trip to the GC will likely be the last of the year but please don't quote me.

Saxifraga Blackberry Apple Pie


It's a dark miserable day here in Edinburgh - I hope the weather is a bit better where you are.  The fire is on and I'm off now to read what others have posted on this Bloom Day.  You can join me over at May Dream Gardens if you like.  Have a nice weekend everyone. 

37 comments:

  1. Lovely to have a rose still blooming!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. Happy Bloom Day to you too Lea - yes, nice to have roses left at this time of the year.

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  2. Shame about your after-frost mush, Angie :( You have some lovely things still blooming, including some of those very dependable astrantia! That primula looks really intriguing - must look it up. Last visit to a garden centre this year ? Not sure I will believe that! Oh, and I remain to be convinced that mahonia have a fragrance too!

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    1. I know not who I was trying to fool by saying it would be my last trip to a GC. In fact I picked up some Daff bulbs on sale at B&Q today. I'm only kidding myself!!

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  3. That mahonia is flowering early isn't it? I guess if you want to see the little daffs you will have to cut back the chrysanthemum at some point once the flowers fade. Ir should do any harm.

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    1. I'm not sure of the normal flowering time Sue - first time it has for me. I pass a garden everyday which has a huge specimen in the front garden and it too is flowering. Maybe the cold has fooled it into thinking it's later in the year??? You are of course right about the Chrysanthemum.

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  4. Hello, I enjoyed visiting your garden. Here we had a lovely warm autumn day.

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    1. Mara, thank you - I'm glad you enjoyed but jealous that you have had a lovely warm day, its rather cold here!

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  5. The sedum and heuchera do look great together, I will try that. You have some gorgeous blooms there, especially the rose. I do get the mahonia scent but there are many other flowers my husband claims are wonderfully fragrant... and I can't smell a thing!

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    1. They do don't they. I saw this on a blog (can't remember which) and decide to give it a go. I'll need to give the Mahonia another sniff just in case I missed it! I've a mother who is just the opposite of your husband, she doesn't like the scent of most things I say is gorgeous.

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  6. You have still a variety of flowers in your garden, some Astrantias. a Primula and already a Mahonia and roses are still going strong, but it won't be long. Here in Holland we had a lovely sunny day.

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    1. Janneke - the cold will probably hit it full force and all will be gone soon enough! It's nice to enjoy meantime. Glad to read you've had a sunny day - it's dry but cold here today.

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  7. That's a really lovely astrantia. I am generally pretty useless at doing the Chelsea Chop, I have great intentions but never quite follow through, but it really would be worth being a little more disciplined to get that second flush of flowers. As for mahonia scent, I have discovered that I have a pretty bad sense of smell, particularly when I am outdoors, as my nose usualy runs so much only the most violent whiffs get through! So I miss mahonia, viburnum, witch hazel, you name it, I miss the scent. Like that primula. Happy GBBD!

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    1. Janet - I'm not usually a Chelsea Chopper either. I'm of the opinion that the conditions up here are not suitable enough to give the plant time to recover. Although as I've mentioned this year has been exceptional and my intentions were not to have more blooms just tidy foliage.
      As shame your sense of smell is lacking - you are missing out aren't you!

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  8. Mahonia! I always forget about that plant, even though I think I have just the spot for one. Your astrantia is very impressive - maybe it will just keep on blooming! I think it's wonderful that you've had good weather. So many times all can do is complain about what Mother Nature is throwing at us. It's almost a relief that someone's happy with what they're getting!

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    1. You will need to keep a very big post it note to remind you Holley. I bought this one on impulse and I'm so glad I made room for it! It's not often you will hear me praising the weather (unless I'm overseas somewhere hot and sunny) here in Scotland.

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  9. Everything looks beautiful, but I especially like the Astrantia! What a lovely cultivar. I wonder if I have room for that in my garden ...

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    1. Thank you Beth - I'm sure you could find room for the Astrantia, it's not terribly big. It is a lovely one, especially the green tips to the edges of the bracts (?).

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  10. I love your Astrantia. What other plant brings flowers from may untill now. The mahonia is a great one. I wish my garden was much larger.
    Have a wonderful weekend.

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    1. Astrantias are very worthwhile. I don't think we gardeners are ever happy with the size of our gardeners - we all wish for just a bit more space!

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  11. So much colour for so far North ! very impressed ! I was having to scavenge about for flowers to photograph, here in Lincolnshire. The Wedgewood rose looks fantastic. Do English roses do well for you ?

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    1. Thanks Jane - you would have thought it would have been the reverse! Yes, English Roses do well here, I don't grow many (4) but they are all happy and suffer very little.

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  12. Mahonias are not all scented, maybe Charity is one without but it's a great, architectural plant. Just planted some Astrantia Hadspen Blood because I'm such a fan of them. I'm impressed how little your plants seem affected by the frost. Your yellow chrysanthemums are very cheerful! Have a nice weekend, Angie :)

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    1. I've read it is Annette - Frances comments below that it may be the colder weather might be the reason. I love Astrantia and Hadspen Blood is a lovely one too - I grow Moulin Rouge and Ruby Wedding too. Both red and just as nice! Hope you have a great week end too!

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  13. you have a lot blooming Angie, I find that with the cooler weather perfumes just don't come through, they need a bit of warmth, the flowers look nice though and will add a bit of sunshine through winter, your astrantia looks beautiful, Frances

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    1. Frances, maybe you've hit the nail on the head! Thanks for that it would explain why I can't smell it. I hope the flowers don't suffer with the bad weather we have forecast.

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  14. The summer and autumn has been great Angie, it can’t be said enough, it has been quite special – although we have had a lot of rain down here lately, more than usual, but I don’t mind it so much at this time of year. Your garden looks lovely, so may plants still in flower. I cut my chrysanthemums right back to base when the flowers are gone and the new growth appears, sometime in December or January, not sure if you are supposed to do it then or leave it till later but it gets very difficult to do it later when new growth has started to grow taller. I love your Wedgewood Rose, if I could only find a space for it…these days I need to look for small (tiny) plants if they should have any hope of getting a place in my garden.

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    1. I suspect that once my plants start to mature I'll be in the same boat as you Helene - as it stands at the moment I can still find room for some plants, some will have to go eventually but in the meantime I'm enjoying giving different things a try. Thanks for you comments re the Chrysanthemum - what you do is what I had in mind but just wanted some opinions first.

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  15. I enjoyed your November blooms Angie and was surprised to read how mild it's been in your neck of the woods up to now. Looks as if it is about to change this week. Funny how plants do not read the gardening books and behave out of character at times. Makes life more interesting :) Your 'Wedgewood' rose certainly has staying power. Is she scented?

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    1. Indeed - all to change Anna. I rushed out today to throw some mulch down on a new border I planted up in the summer. The plants should all be hardy enough but I feel better giving them a wee bit of a help this year.
      Yes, The Wedgewood Rose is scented - it's gorgeous. Described by DA as fruity on the outer petals and clove like at the centre.

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  16. Hello Angie, your garden is blooming wonderfully, lots of color. Scotland is a country which has always been a dream to see, and i guess that started when i was still in highschool. That is the reason i have blogger friends there whom i always follow. In fact, Rosie of leavesnbloom is a favorite in that part of the world,and we have been communicating in our blogs for many years now.

    Thank you so much for praying and sending positive thoughts to our people. I am amazed and curious why you have extended family in Samar; and I love the way you mentioned the happening here in your post. My appreciation.

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    1. Andrea - what lovely comments you make about Scotland. I follow Rosie too - she has a lovely garden.
      My SIL is from Samar (San Augustin, Lavezares) - I've visited a few times and they always make me very welcome. My brother lived in Sta. Rosa, Laguna for 10 years.

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  17. Hello Angie, your garden is blooming wonderfully, lots of color. Scotland is a country which has always been a dream to see, and i guess that started when i was still in highschool. That is the reason i have blogger friends there whom i always follow. In fact, Rosie of leavesnbloom is a favorite in that part of the world,and we have been communicating in our blogs for many years now.

    Thank you so much for praying and sending positive thoughts to our people. I am amazed and curious why you have extended family in Samar; and I love the way you mentioned the happening here in your post. My appreciation.

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  18. Nice to see so many lingering beauties in your post. Here, not so much.

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  19. Angie how amazing to see so many blooms still going for so long especially Astrantia.

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  20. You still have lots of colour. For a really fragrant Mahonia I grow Mahonia japonica which flowers later in winter but it is lovely to have the colour now.I love the Primula francisca; how amazing having it in bloom now. Mine flowers all through the summer but never in Spring with the other primulas. I think it's one of the prettiest.
    Chloris

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  21. I lost my 7 ft Mahonia due to our bad winters a few years ago - I still miss those blooms but wary of planting another one. Can't believe you've still got astrantia in flower! Oh I love your Primula Francisca. I should have bought one last year but I wasn't sure if it would flower in the winter the way it said it would on the label Hopefully there will be some for sale soon again as yours looks lovely.

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