Monday, 7 October 2013

Buzzards? More like Bluzzards!

At the weekend I was busying myself taking some shots around the garden in the early evening light - just practicing really.  This shot of the Verbena bonariensis might have been a bit better had I not managed to capture the tops of the equipment in the kids playpark or the industrial building over the way!


As I pointed and shot my way around all of a sudden my attention was grabbed by this cat like squealing that was coming from the sky above.  What was that?  As I pointed my camera upwards - I zoomed in - although zooming in was a complete waste of time - the birds were just too fast for me! Out of around 30 shots only one of reasonable quality to aid with ID.

Buzzard minus it's head




After identifying it as our common buzzard (Buteo buteo) I've since found out that these are often called 'The Tourist Eagle'.  They are often seen by the sides of motorways perching on Pylons and posts and mistaken for our larger birds of prey.  I've also read that whilst their numbers are recovering from recent decline - they are still persecuted and die from poisoning.

This afternoon that now familiar call could be heard again.  There were around 5 or 6 of them.  Although I don't know for certain - I suspect it was the adults teaching the youngsters how to hunt.  By the time I got back out with the camera they were way off in the distance.  After a lot of toing and froing the youngsters disappeared completely and only the 2 adults were left, hovering and soaring above the trees.

These are unfortunately the best shots I could get


From the back step....please excuse the neighbours washing!






The family have agreed that there will be no need for me to enquire with the BBC for employment as a Wildlife Photographer.  It might be ever so easy to get shots of bees and beasties around the garden, providing they are either slow enough or happily gorging themselves on nectar but these beauties were another matter!

Weather permitting and provided they return, I'll scout about to see if I can get a better vantage point in the park.  Perhaps the kids slide might come in handy - provided I don't get my backside stuck that is!  If you don't see me around you know where I'll be!

16 comments:

  1. You might not be Wildlife Photographer of the year, but don't be surprised if you get headhunted by Persil when they see that washing shot.

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    1. Thanks for making me love - love your sense of humour :)

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    2. Do you think they'd be offended if I told them I didn't use Persil ;) Anyway, not my washing - it's the neighbours! She might well use is!

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  3. That we fail to take pictures like a bird us permits. Well, as you know to which the bird doing the pictures. Yours.

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    1. Yes, not an easy task Giga. I was pleased to be able to ID, that way I can keep a look out for them in future.

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  4. Oh, birds are notoriously difficult to photograph unless you feed them, good on you for trying! The only birds I have successfully taken pictures of are birds in my garden that either have been bathing in my bird bath or eating my expensive bird food. I suppose if you lay out some dead mice or some rabbit meat on your bird table they might come and visit you – but that would probably scare off all the other birds in the area for this season!

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    1. Helene, I'm not to bad at getting shots of birds in the garden. They are generally quite easy to capture, like as you say, so long as there is food for them.
      One of the cats brought me a dead mouse this afternoon - there is a tree stump over the road where I usually put them - the magpies are quick enough at the take up!!

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  5. Ha! You know I can relate to this post. ;-) Love it! I especially like the shot of the buzzard minus the head. Actually, the other photos are pretty good. If you cropped them and enlarged them, I bet they'd be fine. But I definitely understand your thoughts. This is a fun post!

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    1. Beth - I tried cropping them but they were a bit fuzzy - hence the reason I thought I'd make light of my not so good photography skills! David Bailey I am NOT!

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  6. We have lots of birds of prey including buzzards and I'm always fascinated. Thankfully they leave our hens alone! Haven't heard from you in a while and hope all is well. Best wishes :), annette

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    1. Annette - good that they leave your hens alone. That would not be a nice sight!

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  7. Angie, this is so recognizable. On my dogwalks in the morning I often see birds I want to photograph, but I am always too late or they are too far away. The pictures I made are the same as yours. I suppose we need a very good camera to zoom the birds in and need a lot of patience, waiting for the right time. Anyway the shot of the Verbena bonariensis is great!

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    1. Janneke - patience is a thing I have little off! Maybe one day I will have an all singing, all dancing camera!

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  8. The missteps always make for the best, most humorous tales.
    Whenever I see these graceful birds circling in the sky, Richard brings me back to earth by telling me they're turkey buzzards (not much romance there).

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  9. Capturing a good photo of a flying bird is difficult bordering on impossible.

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