Friday, 13 September 2013

September Bloom Day 2013

Wind and gale force winds are battering the garden today.  Thank goodness I had the foresight to get out and snap some shots of what's blooming yesterday and Friday.  That's what we garden bloggers do on the 15th of every month, right?  We flaunt our blooms for the world to see.  Carol over at May Dream Gardens very kindly hosts Garden Blogger Bloom Day meme.  Pop over to link in your post.
      
My little front garden, which is in much need of inspiration, planning and plants.  The front garden differs enormously from the side and back gardens.  It has very well drained soil, full of stones and gravel.  This tends to be the place where I stick struggling plants or impulse buys.

As a testament to just how well drained the soil is - these Gladioli have survived here for the last 4 years.  An impulse buy at the time, I wasn't fussy if they survived not!  Gladioli surviving in the open ground in Scotland over winter is certainly not the norm!  They have even been joined by a self set Lavender seedling. For the moment I have to live with this combo.  The gladioli grows up through the middle!





Variegated Weigela 'Kosteriana' has thrown out a couple of late blooms. 


Weigela Kosteriana Variegata
Scabiosa atropurpurea Beaujolais Bonnets looks equally good with Polemonium caeruleum and Sedum telephium Gooseberry Fool.  The white bellflowers of Campanula persicifolia, are much more compact and don't need support second time around. 



My shady side garden is a mass of foliage in different forms and colours for most of the year - Hosta Halcyon is just holding onto the last blooms.

Colchicum autumnale

You all know what this is don't you?  Well, I didn't!!  I was handed a large pot of green strappy leaves a few years back.  'Purple flowers' my brother told me.  A gift from his neighbour who didn't know what they were called either.  Each year, the leaves grew and produced no flowers.  Earlier in the summer, I decided that they were never going to amount to much so they had to go.  I must have missed one of the corms.  Not one of my finest garden moments!  Unaware of their beauty they were relegated to the huge compost bin in the sky!  I wonder do any of you know will they naturalise from a single corm or would it be wise to purchase more?


The border which holds my teeny tiny wildlife pond has had a good old tidy up and there are a few blooms to share this September.  Lupins, Astrantia and Ajuga all flowered earlier in the year, it's nice to see their flowers again.      
The yellow waxy blooms of Kirengeshoma palmatum
Ajuga Burgundy Glow with a late flush of blooms.

Astrantia major Ruby Wedding
flowers again.

Lupin and a rescue pot of Rudbeckia
Whilst the new shrubs I planted further up on the shadier side have settled in, the old Hydrangea hasn't flowered (It's days are numbers!) Primula vialii, Persicaria Red Dragon and a Hardy Geranium are still flowering.

Persicaria microcephala Red Dragon with
Geranium himalayense Gravetye scrambling through the stems

A single Primula vialii bloom lost amongst a mass of foliage

A few weeks ago I managed to source a new David Austin rose I had been after for a while, I had hoped Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton might make her blog debut this September, despite being full of buds, they remain tightly closed.  Although the rain today might put paid to those!  I've chosen a few darker leaved Heucheras and Sedums to compliment her bronze coloured foliage.  

Heuchera Binoche
extends the season by flowering again 

Sedum unknown variety

Very poor picture of a new purchase
Sedum Red Globe
Clematis Ville de Lyon
There is little going on in the border at the top end of the garden.  The yearly debate of whether Heptacodium miconoides will flower or not rages on!  It's a young plant and the last 2 years, the flowers have been taken with an early frost.  I've high hopes this perfect year!  Meanwhile Clematis Ville de Lyon is just about to succumb to powdery mildew and Clematis Josephine, is this year's miracle plant.  She disappeaedr from this spot 2 years ago.  Yet, back with a vengeance this year.  She should have flowered in June and produced smaller single flowers this late in the year.  She opened her first flower yesterday.

Clematis Josephine
The sunnier side of the garden is still reasonably healthy looking the hot autumnal colours are holding on in there!
Helenium, Persicaria and others in the hot bed
Lemon scented Pelargonium
  
Note the Lemon scented Pelargonium in the pot - I successfully brought this through winter last year with high hopes for this year.  It's been rather disappointing and is only just flowering now.  Anyone else growing these?  I'd appreciate any tips - I did wonder if the late start to the year might have been the problem.




Rosa Warm Welcome 

Around the arbour The Wedgewood Rose flowers again - I share with you a shot taken a few days ago, they've probably been decimated by wind and rain today.
Rosa The Wedgewood Rose
A couple of new patio roses around the arbour seat, reduced by 50% in price at a local supermarket have settled in.  I was taken by surprise that they flowered this year, they had been pruned to within an inch of their life!
Rosa Happy Times
The long sunny bed, aka The Bee Garden - still has tons of offer for our garden visitors. 
  
 
Monarda and various Phlox paniculata

Cardoons, Sedums, Potentilla, Anemone, Verbena, Achillea, Salvia and Astrantia 
 
As the perfect summer draws to a close, I'd like to share with you the perfect ending, if I may!

Until summer 2012, red tailed bumblebees (Bombus lapidarius) regularly visited my garden in their numbers.  I considered myself lucky that they had chosen to nest underground amongst the shrubs in a particular part of the garden.  Sadly, this area was flooded last year.  I witnessed the Queen making her bid for freedom.  She was drenched and I would imagine pretty well exhausted.  Not wanting to interfere with nature, I watched as she recovered and dried out.  It took a good few hours for her to fly away. 

As the months passed this year, I had made not one single sighting of these creatures.  Not only did I scour my own garden - I asked neighbours if they minded joining in on our own personal Bee Watch.  Until a couple of weeks ago, none of us had a positive sighting.  Sitting on the back step, something black flew straight by my nose!  I closed my eyes, not daring to wish for fear of disappointment.  This disappointment was not to be!  A lone bee flitted about flower to flower.  I daren't move for fear of frightening it off.  Having spent an good while feeding off it flew. 

     

They may not have returned in their droves but there has been one or two visiting every day.  I'm so pleased they have come back to visit my garden! 

Have a happy Bloom Day!  I'm off now to see what everyone else has blooming!


49 comments:

  1. What a lovely garden you have. I especially like the looks of your "hot" bed and your bee garden. Gotta do what we can to help those bees! Happy Bloom Day to you.

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    1. Thanks for visiting Dorothy. Yes, I try to do as much as I can for the bees. There is something about the sight of a garden full of bees!

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  2. I enjoy the diversity in your garden!! My favorite photo is of the lupin and the rudbeckia - that just looks like summer to me. Oh and your wedgwood rose is gorgeous. I may have to put it on my wishlist.

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    1. Stacy, thanks. I do like the lupin combo too! The Wedgwood Rose is lovely and scented too! Worthy of putting on your wish list.

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  3. Your shade area garden is lovely with different combinations of texture and I also enjoyed your combination of Lupine and Rudbeckia. Nice gardens and a Happy GBBD to you!

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    1. Lee, thank you very much. The shade garden is now very full and needs to be thinned out a bit but I can't bring myself to do it.

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  4. Stop worrying, your Colchicum will multiply, I planted 5 a few years ago, now each year I am moving more and more to other shady spots. I really like your shady border with your purple acer, lovely combination of colours, shapes and textures. You have so much flowering in your garden, it must be a wonderful sight. I am still waiting for the flowers on my Kirengeshoma to open up, why am I behind you?!

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    1. Great news Pauline, thanks for that. I've no idea why you are behind me, you would think it was the other way around, strange one that ;)

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  5. There is lots of late summer colour in your garden, Angie. I especially enjoyed the Rudbeckia/Lupin combination and the Astrantia major 'Ruby Wedding'. Great news about the return of the red tailed bee!

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    1. More late colour than I remember - which is pleasing :) The Astrantia is a beautiful shade, one of my favourites. So glad to see the red tailed bee coming back. We read so much about the decline of bees, it was quite distressing that they hadn't visited.

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  6. Hi Angie, some lovely blooms and some fab colour combinations - especially love the blue of those lupins! very unusual! Lovely with the yellow of the Rudbeckia.
    And ... er... has anyone told your gladioli they are sposed to be tender !!

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    1. Thank you. Obviously the Gladioli don't read the planting instructions!

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  7. Your shady side garden looks so beautiful, it is the combination of various colours of foliage. Colchicums multiply easily, I have some under a tree, but not yet in bloom. Beautiful cardoon, the red Astrantia and the Lupin with Rudbeckias. Very nice!

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    1. Thanks for telling me the Colchicums multiply easily Janneke. That will teach me to get an id before I do anything drastic!

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  8. Beautiful Garden Pictures! Just lovely!-aimee {new follower}

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    1. Aimee - thank you and thanks for following :)

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  9. I guess there is something to be said for a slovenly style: I am in no danger of digging up a promising plant before its time. Your lone survivor will soon multiply, so no harm done.

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    1. Have to admit I'm trying a bit to have a more slovenly style Ricki - I just need to keep myself away from the hoe and secateurs!

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  10. Your autumn garden is lovely! I have had Astrantia major Ruby Wedding on my wish list for a long time, I just don’t have any more free space on my sunny part of the garden, it is very small compared to the more shady side so I have to be very choosy with what I put in there, but I love seeing the Astrantias in your photos. Congrats with your new David Austin, Lady Emma Hamilton is a lovely rose. Great to hear your bees are back, down here it has been a great year for all sorts of bees and butterflies, although the last 10 days they haven’t been much around I guess, neither have I, it has been raining every day! I finally got a few hours in the garden today, but it was very windy and cold, had to pull out my winter garden coat – it’s only September, this is too early for me!!

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    1. Kind words Helene. I don't grow A. Ruby Wedding in full sun. They get sun in the afternoon only. They do ok with it. Yes, winter gardening clothing required now!

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  11. Hi Angie, Gladiola still looking so strong after four years isn't the norm right enough. Not only that you talk of a self seeded Lavender, never seen the likes, not only is that unusual, its also a French Lavender and they are even more tender. Blooms in the back are looking outstanding.

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    1. Alistair, you of all my readers, fully understand how odd it is that the Glads have survived!! I can't bring myself to get rid of them now - they obviously want to be here :)
      I had a French Lavender hedge running up the path a few years ago. It was removed at least 3 years ago. I've had tiny seedlings appear but die in winter. Another survivor, it seems!

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  12. I love your wildlife pond and the lupines with the rudbeckia. Also your shade garden has such a rich mix of textures, very nice! And congrats on the return of your bumblebee!

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    1. Thanks Jason - I'm contemplating a new project for spring....a new and much bigger pond. We shall see how that pans out!!

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  13. Dear Angie it was a such a pleasure reading your blog.

    These gladies are stunning Angie:)

    And love your heuchera Binnoiche

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    1. Thanks Kath - Binnoche is a beauty. Probably big enough to share next year ;)

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  14. Ooohhh!! Your garden is just so beautiful! I love it!! Your shade garden is just fabulous. :o)

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    1. Thanks for visiting and an even bigger thank you for the compliments :)

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  15. I wonder if my missing presumed dead clematis will appear at any point?

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    1. Sue - the stems are quite attractive to snails/slugs at the beginning of the year and often make a comeback given the right conditions - i.e. not many slugs and snails. I noticed a few days after writing this that Elsa Spath is growing again after being absent for just as long!

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  16. Good news about the bees! You have some beautiful combinations of plants! The colors, foliage, and forms work so well together. I especially like the Lupine and Rudbeckia--I have them together in my garden, too, but they don't bloom at the same time.

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    1. Yes, great news Beth! I always find that Lupins flower here for most of the year providing I cut the dead stems right back. Maybe worth giving a try

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  17. You have a lot going on in your beautiful autumn garden, Angie! That gladioli is amazing! Love your bee story. P. x

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    1. Pam, glad you like the Gladioli - TBH, I don't but as it's determined to live here then I will let it be :)

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  18. I think you are an encyclopaedia about flowers, their names and flowering plants. What beautiful and unusual flowers you have in your garden. That unknown sedum grows in my garden also. It is a native of North-East USA, but I don't know what's it is called.

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    1. Thank you. I don't know why the names of plants stay in my head but they do - odd!!!
      Yes, a popular sedum as it divides well and is so easy providing they don't get too wet.

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  19. I love how the gladioli is growing up through the lavender. What a pretty combination. But your shade garden is just stunning. And the colors and foliage textures! Beautiful. I was glad to hear that a bee returned to your garden. I hope their numbers continue to increase.

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    1. Often the best combinations are by accident rather that planning Holley and this is the former as the lavender seeded itself. I'm glad the bees have returned and they have been doing so regularly now!

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  20. Angie your garden is putting on quite a show...as for the Colchicum autumnale....you will want a few more as they take a while to naturalize.

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    1. Thanks Donna - I noticed my brother has quite a few in his garden, might just help myself ;)

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  21. Angie - your garden is looking wonderful! So much still in colour and even if you have just shown us the best bits there are so many of them and I don't think I could say which part I like best. I see you have P 'Red Dragon' too - has yours gone wild this year too?

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    1. Cathy, P Red Dragon is a replacement for the one I lost but yes, it's gone wild. Being honest, I under estimated it's size ;)

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  22. Your gladioli is phenomena! Love the colour a lot. I used to have a white one. I think they are gone now. The Weigela Kosteriana Variegata looks interesting. Looks like some of the tropical plants we have here.

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    1. Stephanie - thank you. The gladioli was not intended to be a keeper - I'm almost afraid to plant others for fear of disappointment!

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  23. Some really beautiful blooms to celebrate, how lovely. The gladioli are magnificent, amazing the difference really good drainage makes, I think it is even more important that the amount of wet for border line hardy plant survival. Not something I have had available until now.

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    1. Janet - yes I agree re drainage. It's more often the wet than the cold that gets them! Since I've done very little in my front garden - I am encouraged by the good drainage and perhaps give other things a try.

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  24. Your garden looks AMAZING!! True inspiration to all those out there that think autumn means it's all over. Now off to read it again to 'borrow' some more ideas ;-)

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    1. Jane, borrow away! Even today, there are little signs of autumn in my garden yet as I look around at the trees - there is a slight change in colour so it won't be too long now I suspect!

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