Monday, 1 July 2013

June 2013 - my end of month review

Reviewing my garden today for my end of month review would have been made so much easier had we not been subject to very high winds.  Making it almost impossible to get a few decent snaps.  Luckily I began snapping a couple of days ago so I have something to offer.

As I look around, I can tell you that I'm more than pleased with most plants.  The last of the sickly (Cushion Scale) Rhododendrons have now been removed.  To many of you my measures have probably been a bit drastic - I pondered long and hard on what to do.  Apparently non-chemical control would only be practical on smaller shrubs.  Chemical treatment using a systemic insecticide such as Provado Ultimate Bug Killer was not a road I wanted to go down.  There is enough destruction to the insect and bee population without me adding to it!

Replacement plants have now been purchased.  They come in the form of Actinidia kolomikta to grow up the fence, until recently I always thought these plants were tender - not so it seems.  Hardy down to -40 according to Kew.  Berberis thunbergii Rose Glow - it's foliage should compliment splashes of pink and white in the Actinidia.  Cotoneaster x suecicus Coral Beauty a wee something for the bees. 

New plants June 2013

The more observant amongst you will note 6 pots.  What else did I buy?  I hear you ask.  A gorgeous honeysuckle, Lonicera Fragrant Cloud was screaming to come home with me.  A spot has yet to be chosen.  I keep changing my mind on where I want to put it.  A little Philadelphus Manteau d'Hermine should be small enough to snuggle in the top corner of this border.   It will replace the rather uninteresting Cornus that is currently growing there and a replacement Persicaria Red Dragon which has completely disappeared from the garden.

Top sunny border

The top end of this border flooded last year - whilst there were many casualties - oddly enough the Beared Iris have survived despite being submerged in water for weeks on end.  They have not flowered but are healthy enough to move elsewhere in autumn.  This bed is a bit of a mish mash - I experimented with various plants - my dilemma is what to plan for.  In the 6 years I've lived here, last year was the only time it has flooded.   The Persicaria, Trollius and Candelabra Primula are suitable either way - the Astilbes are also coping with the dry sunny position.  These were budget supermarket buys at the end of the year - an experiment to see what will survive.  Anyway, a bit of jiggery pockery and purple foliage is all that it needed I think!

June weather here has continued to impress - with just the right amount of rainfall, mainly through the night ensuring the plants have had adequate water.  It should be noted that although there has been a distinct lack of good insect activity there is also a marked reduction in slugs/snails and other pests.  The bees visiting this last week have increased in numbers and as many more plants bloom I expect that to continue.  Cabbage white butterflies have fleeted through but have not stopped - probably preferring what Jim next door has on offer (masses of veg growing in his plot).

Whilst many of the herbaceous perennials are on their way to catching up, flowering shrubs however remain weeks behind.    Pyracanthus, Cotinus and Deutzia should be in bloom for bloom day.  There are a couple of shrubs in flower and more than likely will not last the 2 weeks until then.

Sambucus nigra Black Lace

Cotoneaster dammerii
 
Hydrangea petiolaris
Another of my Peonies flowering this week - Paeonia Madam Calot - standing tall.  I've read a few blogs this week and it seems a few folks have been complaining about supporting their paeonies.  You know who you are - I don't profess to being an expert but do know how important it is to introduce support very early in spring.  It saves a lot of heartache at flowering time! 

Paeonia Mme Calot
  


Mme Calot close up
frilly and fragrant!
Plenty more promise around the garden.  The first rose buds are about to open - The Wedgewood Rose grows as a climber either side of my seated arbor.  This David Austin rose is also known as Ausjosiah.  I love it despite it's thorns!
 
Rosa The Wedgewood Rose (Ausjosiah)
Of course, as many of you will know, I'm partial to the odd Primula and do strive to have at least one in flower every month.  The middle of the month saw Primula japonica and P. bulleyana.  Now at the end of the month we have P. aurantiaca, P. bulleesiana and P. vialii.
 
Black/Bronze stems produce a vibrant orange flower
Primula aurantiaca
 
Another candelabra type Primula
P. Bulleesiana - a vibrant yellow
 
 
Primula vialia - the Orchid Primula
 
Primula vialii - otherwise known as the Orchid Primula is one of my favourites.  It loves the conditions in my Scottish garden.  These are supposed to be tricky to bring through winter but have survived in my garden for 3 years.  They grow in both sun and shade in my garden.  These in a sunnier position are first to flower.  Others will follow as the month progresses.  Incidentally, the bees love them! 
 
I end my monthly review with a frothy mix of Alchemilla and Tellima - after tonight's wind and forecast rain, which is now battering off the windows - I doubt very much that they will still be standing in the morning!
 
 
 
 
I hope you have enjoyed my monthly review, if you have please pop over to Helen at The Patient Gardeners Weblog where you can join in or visit other garden bloggers' monthly reviews.  
 
Thank you for visiting.
 
CAN YOU SPOT THE BEE IN THE PICTURE?
A CLUE - IT'S NOT THE FAKE ONE ON THE WEE BEE HOUSE
 
 

31 comments:

  1. Goodmorning Angie,
    The weather is not much better overhere. The wind is blowing almost every day.
    What a lot of treasure's you have bought. I love the Aconitum. It's gorgeous. Did you ever sow the seeds of the japanese primula? I wish how I could do this. Maybe you have a tip?
    Have a wonderful day

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    1. Marijke - wind has been getting worse here!
      I love that Aconitum too - I have it growing in a couple of places in the garden.
      This will be the first year I will try seeds from my Primulas. A friend has asked me to collect some for him and I will give them a go myself.
      I'll keep you posted on how it goes.

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  2. Good morning Angie, very enjoyable review and I hope the wind will calm soon. It seems we have a lot more wind than we used to. Good choice for the new bed, look forward to its development. Love the snail, your primulas (sulk! can't have them :(). Have the same Sambucus and think it's beautiful. Went for a Schizophragma hydrangeoides instead of Hydrangea petiolaris in my new garden. It's not as hardy but should be fine here...have a nice week :)

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    1. Had to look up Schizophragma - yes it's lovely. Nice foliage - I hope it does well n your new garden.
      The Sambucus is a stunning plant when it's large enough. Shame you can't grow Primulas - they are lovely plants.
      Hope you have a good week too :)

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  3. You have some lovely plants blooming. I do like the Primula's. Peonies always are beautiful. Looks like some great plants lined up there waiting for their new spots.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. Cher, thank-you. I made a start with planting and moving yesterday and hopefully get it finished tomorrow. Rain was heavy today!

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  4. Love the bee hiding away in the bloom! My peonies have completed their blooming, but I never tire of seeing them as in your garden.

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    1. I never tire of seeing peonies either - I think the fact that they aren't around for so long, makes them a bit more special!

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  5. you have a lot of lovely plants Angie, I see you also have plants jump in your basket ;) it might seem drastic but I think removal is safest, I had a lovely row of primula vulgaris the native primrose along my front path, it was there for about 6 yrs and then one year some had hard stems it took me ages to work out it was scale insect and I just kept digging up any that had it, it is what was recommend as it's difficult to get rid of,
    I like your snail sculpture with the pretty contenester, your P vialii looks lovely I hope mine increases as well as yours, I like your astrantias with the primulas and with the A. mollis, Tellima, I hope the winds do not do too much harm, they are forecast to be with us tomorrow, Frances

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    1. Frances, I wonder did the winds get too you. They are still here!!!
      Removing the Rhoddies was for the best - especially as I'm now in 'if it isn't happy it isn't staying mode'
      I mulch my P. vialii with some ericaceous compost in Autumn. The secret is planting them deep enough too. I split one plant last autumn and from 5 pieces 3 made it through winter in the cold frame. They are now gearing up to flower in the Primula bed.

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  6. Must have some of those candelabra primulas. Yours is the first success story I have encountered regarding Primula vialii. "Jiggery pockery" is a new one: translation, please? I don't think I could pull off using it myself, but I do like the sound of it.

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    1. Ricki - Candelabra primulas are a must have if you can grow them. I know many folks who can't get P. vialii through winter and I couldn't believe it when they did the first time. As I said above I mulch with ericaceous compost and they are planted deeply.
      Jiggery Pockery - an old scots phrase, generally meaning fraudulent, underhanded and manipulating. Generally used in terms nowadays for manipulating - moving around. Therefore, moving the plants around the border. I'm sure you can easily use it at some point :)

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  7. The bee is on one of the flower (I think it's foxglove) :-) -- so do I get to see your scottish dance as a prize ;-). Pray, tell me, how do you manage to keep your plants so neat and tidy. What's your magic secret :-)?

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    1. It's not a foxglove but Aconitum (monkshood) KL - you were nearly right. No dance this time :)
      I like keeping things tidy - my secret - far, far too much time on my hands, I think :) There are very few days that I don't do something in the garden. I love weeding in the rain - something very satisfying about it and the wet soil means they come out easier.

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  8. I also like the Primula and Elderberry. I have 'Sutherland's Gold' Elderberry. Sounds like getting rid of the Rhododendron was a good idea. We gardeners must be ruthless! It's kinder to the plant in the long run.

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    1. Jason, Sutherland's Gold is a lovely Elder, I must watch out for it in your posts.
      Yes, getting rid was for the best. I'm not sure how many of the other plants may have been affected. I am now wondering if that is whats wrong with my large holly hedge but can't find any signs, YET!

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  9. Lovely monthly review. You bought a lot of new plants, it is always fun to find something new. Your Sambucus looks really beautiful!

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    1. Janneke - I like finding new plants and giving them a try. Thank you.

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  10. Hi Angie, I have the Philadelphus Manteau d'hermine in a pot in my garden It does very well and looks lovely. I also have the Berberis Rose Glow, somehow or another I managed to place it just at the spot that the sun shines through the foliage in the morning, more luck than judgement but it does look lovely. Your top sunny border looks very tidy harmonious and restful compared to my slightly overgrown and clashing colours borders. I love your photography I am a novice photographer and still struggling. I have a new camera on order, just a point and shoot but it is a start. Blogging is such a steep learning curve.

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    1. Thank you for your lovely comments on my garden - they truly are appreciated.
      I tend to rely on luck a lot in the garden :)
      I have learnt a heck of a lot since I started blogging - it's wonderful!

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  11. What a lovely variety you have in your new plants, they will look super once they have grown. Your peony, Mdme Calot looks scrumptious, such a lot of frilly petals! Your Primula vialii are well ahead of mine, mine have just started to open their mauve flowers, possibly late because mine are in shade apart from early morning.

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    1. Thanks Pauline - the ones I have in the shade are behind too! Mind you they are struggling now with the heat - constant watering is needed this year!

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  12. Oh what lovely new plants! The actinida will do well in your Edinburgh garden as mine got through those two really bad winters a few years ago when the garden reached almost -20 and I live in a frost pocket too. It's a big of a thug and I have to prune it a little every year.

    Kudos to you for getting Vialii to come back again. I think I planted mine in too shady an area which some garden books recommended. But some of those are really written for the south of England while up here some plants need much more sunlight. I also forgot to stake my paeonies and they have really flopped after all that wind this week.

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    1. Rosie - I give my P. vialii a good mulch of ericaceous compost in autumn. Deep planting seems to be the secret!

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  13. Hi Angie, you have so many lovely and interesting plants blooming in your garden right now! My favorites are the paeony and Wedgewood Rose. You could sent me a little bit of your rain to Southern California. We don't have any since months and without artificial watering there would be no garden here anymore. I really love your last photo. So romantic! I am wondering what is the white-greyish bell-shaped flowering plant in the foreground? It almost looks like a foxglove, but somehow not quite...
    Christina

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    1. Christina - we are in dire need of rain here now - a rarity here in Scotland!!
      The plant you are asking about is Aconitum napelus Stainless Steel. It's a great plant to have in the garden but I suspect not suitable for Southern California :)

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  14. Angie, Your Actinidia should be fine, we had it growing against a fence in a sunny position for quite a number of years. I liked the colour shading of the leaves. Our borders can tend to be a bit of a mish mash but for some reason they seem to come together in a pleasing way. The frothy blooms of your Alchemilla just shouts out Summertime for me but why have I never grown Tellima. Thoroughly enjoyed sharing your June review.

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  15. Sorry I am a bit late getting over here but I am glad I did to see all those gorgeous blooms....such a wonderful surprise after all that rotten weather.

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  16. Yes, I was able to see the bee. The pollinators must be very happy in your garden -- it's luscious!

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  17. Lovely lot of plants. I especially your Primulas...particularly vialii...I love that one. I also bought one recently that has a scent just like vanilla.

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  18. I really love the astrania and yellow primulas. Such a great color combination! :o) Your garden is beautiful. :o)

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