Monday, 6 May 2013

White Narcissus

What a difference a few sunny days make!  A statement I have no doubt many of us here in the Northern Hemisphere will be saying to themselves lately.  At the time I posted my end of month review my favourite Narcissus was ALMOST but not QUITE!!

Narcissus Thalia
Narcissus Thalia - a firm favourite of Victorian gardeners had long been ignored for some of the bigger, bolder and shall we say brash varieties that were being introduced.  According to my research N. Thalia is making a comeback and I'm so pleased I got in on the act early on in my gardening 'exploits'.

As I walked out the back door this early evening (to bring the washing in - a woman's work is never done!) the scent hit me - BAM!!  It was gorgeous, from so few blooms it truly was intoxicating!

Whilst looking delicate it is an extremely sturdy flower 


Pure white blooms

Tip - I have grown these bulbs in containers for the last 3 years - they are in a mix of multi-purpose compost, John Innes No2 and some grit for added to aid drainage.  When flowering is finished, they are dead headed and fed with half strenght tomato feed on a weekly basis until the foliage dies back.  When the foliage has died, I lift the contents of the pot and replace with new compost.  The pots are wrapped with bubble wrap for winter and stored against a sunny wall until early spring.  I begin watering (weather dependent) when new growth appears.  It is important that container grown Narcissus are not allowed to dry out during their growing period.

N. Thalia has flowered for well over 2 months in both 2011 and 2012.  It will be interesting to see if the extended winter/late flowering will make a difference this year.

Adding to the delighful scent of N. Thalia is another white daffodil.  Planted for the first time last autumn, these bulbs are, unlike their cousins, kept to the borders.

Narcissus Tresamble has certainly not disappointed me!   N. Tresamble is another daffodil that produces upto 3 flowers on a sturdy stem.  It has stood tall and hasn't been affected by the recent strong winds, another plus as far as I can tell.  Off the 25 bulbs planted, all 25 have produced flowering stems.  Being their first year, this should be expected!

    

Slightly taller than I expected - those planted under the Cornus alternifolia (my favourite shrub) have come along just as the Corydalis, Crocus and Pushkinia have come to an end.  The Cornus is always late coming into leaf in my garden therefore these blooms are equally appreciated to add interest.

Elegant blooms on good strong stems  

A view from below

As I struggle down on my hands and knees - I thought a worms eye view was in order.  A whiff of the scent made the effort very worthwhile!

White or Yellow Daffs......what's your preference?  I have recently added a few yellow daffodils to my garden and whilst I admire them in many gardens, I am really struggling to form any sort of affection for them in mine!

If you are looking to grow some white daffodils I can highly recommend either of these varieties, they would make a great addition to any garden.  I'll be looking into planting another variety of whites this autumn, if you have any recommendation I'd like to hear about them.  Providing they are scented they will be grown in containers by my front door - I'm sure the postie will appreciate them too!

31 comments:

  1. I am a fan of Thalia too. It is such an elegant and reliable daff. I prefer yellow daffodils in some gardens and white in others, it really depends on the setting, but Thalia is one of my favourite daffs.

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  2. I actually like both colors. Yellow just for the obvious. They scream Daf, but I love the purity of the white.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  3. I love the whites. I also like your bubble wrap for the winter storage.

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  4. I have Thalia in my garden too, and it is a real beauty, I'll definitely be adding more. I do still enjoy the splashes of yellow from traditional daffodils though, there's something very cheering about them.

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  5. Angie your whites are so pretty I have never grown white daffs as I love the yellows of Spring .

    But its just so nice to see anything in bloom after such along cold winter.

    I am heading up to Glamis walled garden for 9am.

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  6. I had thalia too and like them very much but they vanished. I enjoy brash daffodils but they are over now and I currently have some very sweetly scented doubles with multiple petals flowering. Don't know what they're called. (Maybe they aren't even daffodils - but I think they are.)

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  7. Hi Angie. Love the pictures and the over-wintering strategy for daffodils. Unfortunately I am not a great lover of white in my garden although I do have a few shrubs which I wouldn't be without. Like many people seem to, I associate yellow with Spring and sort of cling to it as a sign of better things to come. The thing I find with most white daffodils is that they nearly always have a tinge of yellow which somehow makes them more acceptable. Love the blog.....really interesting.

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  8. Beautiful pictures, I too have many different daffodils, but when you ask me I can tell you that the whites are one of my favourites, especially Thalia which is still flowering in the garden.

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  9. Love Thalia, have lots here and will plant more, you can never have enough!I like yellow to start with but then prefer white later. If you want a super pale yellow which flowers now with a fantastic perfume, I would recommend "Pipit".

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  10. I am the same way. In my garden, I don't care for the yellow daffodils. Not sure why that is. I do love the white ones. These are both beautiful. I've grown Thalia, but didn't know about Tresamble. I like that they're a bit taller.

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  11. I have both white and yellow daffs of many varieties...but in the white garden I have Thalia in a few spots and I added in a few more areas in the garden...it is indeed intoxicating!

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  12. The whites are my preference, but the very early yellow ones like tete a tete bring a note of cheer just when we need it.

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  13. I do not have Thalia but I want it! It is absolutely gorgeous in a clump. I also like narcissus that has both white and yellow or orange.

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  14. Hi Angie! wanted to introduce myself and hope that you will come over to Fishtail Cottage's garden party and share a gardening post some time? Love meeting knew gardeners! xoxo,tracie

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  15. Hi Angie,
    My Thalias are already gone by now, you still have a lot to look forward too.
    It's definitely worth it to look at it from a worm's perspective, many bulbs are lovely from that angle. I was especially surprised by my Leucojum aestivum, they have the cutest heart in their bells. Enjoy!

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  16. I'm a simple soul...Tete a Tetes for me everytime...

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  17. Thank you all for your lovely comments. I have not been about for a few days as i've been feeling unwell with a really bad cold.
    I've lots of blogs to catch up with, so apologies if I missed any
    Angie xx

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  18. So pretty these white ones, although my preference is for the yellow always. Have a great week.

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    1. They are very pretty Karen - I think most folks have a preference for the yellow. Obviously yellow is associated with spring too! Have a good one yourself :)

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  19. Hi Angie, hope you are feeling better!
    I have both white and yellow daffodils in my garden, and I like them both. For me it is the yellow daffodils that says "Spring is here!", but the white ones are more delicate and serene I think.

    Take care of yourself and your cold, it's not much gardening weather at the moment anyway so might just as well stay under the covers and get well :-)

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    1. Helene, yes much better. I've got a wee bit behind garden wise but still I'm catching up now!
      Yes, both daffs obviously serve a purpose and Yellow being associated with spring is the main reason they are so popular.
      I hope your weather isn't too bad. We had sleet yesterday!

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  20. I planted a number of white daffodils last fall and have so enjoyed them this year. I like the traditional yellow ones, but the white ones are even prettier if you ask me. I will try to remember to add some Narcissus Thalia and Tresamble next fall. That they are scented is a wonderful bonus.

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    1. Jennifer, I'm never one for bothering much about scent but as it was so strong, I though it best to mention. These have been very worthwhile this year. Good luck in remembering!

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  21. Hello Angie, whilst admiring your Thalia I was just thinking I will have to mention Tresamble to Angie, lo and behold! I have Tresamble for the first time this year growing in a container and will most definitely be keeping them, come Autumn I will also be on the lookout for Thalia. I like the yellows also but have a preference for the shorter varieties.

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    1. Ha ha Alistair, I beat you too it ;) I'm pleased to read you like them too. Some of my Thalia are going to be promoted to a bed this year!

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  22. beautiful blooms and I like the added delight of perfume, I must get some perfumed ones as none of mine seem to have any perfume, I like both white and yellow as I said on another blog it's squashed trumpets I don't like much, I've got some from a mixed bag, Frances

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    1. Frances, the perfume is what inspired me to write this blog. I generally can't smell things very well.
      Yes, I know what you mean, those frilly things leave a bit to be desired too!

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  23. Yellow dafs, no doubt, ever since I read Wordsworth's poem. Growing them in pots seem like lots of work. I am a lazy gardener.

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  24. KL - I think Wordsworth's poem sticks in most peoples mind. My mother can still recite it perfectly! English and reading were not my forte at school. Give me maths any day!!
    I grow them in pots as my soil can get rather wet but half of these will progress to the borders this year - then they are on their own!!

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  25. Thanks for the suggestion. I think I might just try them! I have a lot of yellow Daffodils, but I think I'd like to add some white Narcissus to the mix. They're lovely!

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  26. Those are both beautiful white daffodils, Angie. I don't like to grow many daffs, as the foliage takes up a lot of space for a long time while it's dying. But I may have to try one of those!

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