Thursday, 16 May 2013

May Bloom Day Part 1

I really can't believe it's that time of the month AGAIN! Where does the time go when your having fun!  I say that with a bit of tongue in cheek really.  I've been a wee bit under the weather with a really bad cold and it has taken me an absolute age to shift it.  I'm now in the process of playing catch up on all the little jobs around the garden I had planned for this month!

I'm joining in Garden Bloggers Bloom Day this month.  Kindly hosted by Carol over at May Dream Gardens - it's an opportunity for gardeners from all corners of the globe to get together and share what's blooming and blossoming in their gardens of the 15th of every month.  Head on over if you want to join in!

It's been really difficult to decide what blooms to share with you all - therefore this is Part 1 of 2.  As well as playing catch up in garden, I'm also playing catch up in downloading and editing my garden pictures.   Being that this is the first year I'm recording everything in the garden, I don't want to miss anything out.

The first of the Rhododendrons are flowering R. Shamrock and R. Baden Baden - they would normally be joined by Rhododendron Taurus but as it has struggled with Cushion Scale this last couple of years it was removed from the garden last week.
Rhododendron Shamrock

Rhododendron Baden Baden
The flowers from this shrub are borrowed from next door - just peeping through the fence.  I think it's a Spirea.  


Little pots of Muscari are useful at adding a little spring interest where perennials don't bloom until later in the season.  I like the delicate colours of these - they make a nice change to the darker blue of the more common one.     


Despite being very optimistic in February - my attempts at succeeding to bringing tulips through 2 winters in containers has taken a bit of a knock.  I suppose that winter 2011/12 doesn't really count as winter as it was so mild!  Many have come up blind, others have miniscule flower heads and others are half the height and don't look like they going to produce a bloom worth blogging about!  Not pictured here today are 2 pots of Tulipa Queen of the Night.  Identical pots, both treated the same way after flowering in the 2 previous years, yet 1 pot has come up completely blind and the other has half and half of blooms (yet to open) and deformed flower heads.     
  
The little creamy white tulips, with no name, that share a pot with Narcissus Thalia are somewhat disappointing - only 2 bulbs produced flowers - the remaining 8 are blind.  The fact that the Daffs are doing so well in the container leaves me baffled!  I'd be interested if anyone has a thought on this.



Tulipa National Velvet is another confusing case!  They are shades lighter than they were in previous years.  All bulbs produced flower heads with only half of them choosing to open.  As you can see from the picture they are not the dark maroon colour they should be.  I don't particularly mind this colour - it matches perfectly with my new Aqueligia! 

Tulips National Velvet and Aqueligia Spring Magic Pink
   
A couple of alpine flowering this May - both quite different in nature.

Soldanella villosa - requires a moist cool shady spot.  This one grows in a container unlike the others in borders which have yet to flower.  it's common name is Snowbell and will push it's dainty little flowers up through the snow on the mountain tops of Europe.

Soldanella villosa

Erysimum kotschianum - Alpine Wallflower, prefers a sunny well drained site.  It has settled in well in the Alpine Trough.  It's bright yellow flowers really do stand out.



I've 2 Clematis flowering right now - both have not come through winter unscathed.

Clematis cartmanii Pixie - an H3 hardy evergreen climber.  Protected in winter with fleece thrown over it and stored against a sunny wall for shelter.  Certainly not abundant in growth but has produced a few of it's waxy blooms.  It will be given a larger container later in the season when it has finished flowering.

Clematis cartmanii Pixie


Clematis alpina Helsingborg has flourished in the garden this past few years but a 'cat fight' between one of my cats and a stranger that ventrued into the garden saw the clematis almost torn apart from it's support.  I spent a whole afternoon recently carefully snipping and untying all all the damaged stems.  Only 1 single stem has survived.  I live in hope that it will regenerate from the base.

Clematis alpina Helsingborg

Fritillaria, Primula and Narcissus from previous posts are still looking well enough to be considered 'flowering'.  The usual spring herbaceous plants are flowering - I will be including them in Part 2 of this post.

If you've liked any of my plants and want any more information on them you can follow the links I've provided to my 'What's Growing' pages - here you will find growing information on each plant.

Thank you for joining me this May GBBD - please come back soon.


30 comments:

  1. Lots of pretty blooms there. I love that Clematis Pixie. Very pretty.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. Thanks Cher. Yes, Pixi is a pretty wee thing. It's finding at new home when it's finished flowering.

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  2. Hello Angie, thanks for dropping by. I forgot if you're the one who has already came here to our country, Scotland is one country on top of my visit wish list, but might remain a dream. I have a blogger friend there Rosie of leavesnbloom photography, now i know 2 from there. I know you've just been through a long cold and your blooms look very relieved they are now out. My favorite is the grape hyacinth because of the color and shapes, and your rhododendron color looks very tropical.

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    1. Kalantikan - you certainly would never be disappointed if you visited Scotland. Yes, a long winter. Rosie lives not too far from where I am in Edinburgh.

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  3. Such pretty blooms. Your Clematis cartmanii and tulips are just beautiful! Happy GBBD to you!

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    1. Lee - thank you for dropping over. It certainly is a lovely Clematis, I'm pleased it made it through winter.

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  4. Very pretty!
    Interesting to see your lighter colored Muscari. I thought they were all blue.
    Love the tulips even if they are not the color they should be.
    Wonderful Clematis!
    Thanks for your visit and comment on my blog.
    Happy Gardening!
    Lea
    Lea's Menagerie

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    1. Lea, whilst the blue Muscari is lovely, I do prefer the pastel shades, they are such lovely gentle little blooms. I like how sometimes a plant can change it's colour and still doesn't disappoint :)

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  5. I am loving so many of your flowers - the rhodo baden baden -- it must be supremely gorgeous if the whole tree gets filled up with such heavenly reddish colored flowers; I love that yellowish grape muscari and the clemantis. Even the tulips look gorgeous.

    Why do you say winter of 2011-12? Do you mean 2012-13? The winter was mild there? Here it was not, and still freezing...

    Without knowing that they are alpine, I bought plants like erysimum and saxifrages. Now coming to know from you that they are alpine.

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    1. KL - I mean winter 2011-12 the one before this year. It was a lovely winter and many plants didn't die back. This winter however, a different story!!
      Check your Erysimum - it's possible it's not an alpine. Most of them are border perennials.

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  6. How lovely to see your rhododendrons in flower already, mine is a couple of weeks away from flowering. Sorry to hear about your cleamtis, hope it will recover, even if it might take the rest of the year. It has some lovely blue flowers! And I love your muscari too, I agree that the pastel flowers are lovely. I haven't got any muscari in my garden, but I have thought about getting some for my woodland corner.

    Hope you have recovered from your cold by now, I was hoping for some warmer weather this week-end so I could get a bit more done in the garden but my thermometer seems to be stuck on 12 degrees C!
    Have a great week-end, regardless of the weather :-)
    Take care, Helene.

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    1. Helene - feeling much better thank you. Still trying to catch up with jobs around the garden though! Muscari does look good planted en masse. They appartently spread quite easily so should fill up your woodland area in no time!

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  7. Love all your beautiful flowers. Gorgeous photos! New Follower.

    Jody

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    1. Jody and Stan - thank you ever so much for following. I hope you enjoy my postings.

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  8. I was interested in your experience with bulbs in pots. Most bulbs make good container subjects, particularly as it enables us to provide better drainage. Tulips (other than species) tend not to do well a second year so I generally treat them as annuals. They need a good baking for one thing which the UK climate is not good at. Narcissus will come back again for a couple of years if well fed and not planted too closely together. Unfortunately, to obtain a good show, I plant in two layers which tends not to work too well if you want to keep them for a second year. Two years ago I planted identical containers with narcissus which I somehow forgot to plant in the open garden after flowering so they were pretty much left to one side, the next year, one container had no flowers, the other was perfect. That's gardening!

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    1. Rick - yes, I think i will jst have to great them as annuals. A good baking and UK do not go together, especially here in Scotland.
      I will put the Narcissus into the garden this year to free up some pots. I'll put the tulips in the front garden where it's far sunnier and drainage is better. I can bring Gladioli through winter there, so maybe here is a chance for the tulips!

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  9. Ciao, bellissima la soldanella!!! Qui la si trova in alta montagna :) Purtroppo qui i colori dei fiori sono spenti perché piove sempre e il sole manca da giorni e giorni :(

    Un saluto!

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    1. Sì Pontos, è una bella pianta e cresce bene qui in Scozia. Si fa a crescere nel vostro giardino?

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  10. Lovely blooms...I know how you feel...it can be overwhelming putting these Bloom Day posts together...you just want to share EVERYTHING! Love the Soldanella villosa, btw, that's one I've never heard of :-)

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    1. Scott - Soldanella is a pretty little thing. Worth growing if you can give it the right conditions.

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  11. Well, that shoots down my plan to grow tulips in posts so I can see where they want to go at bloom time. Thanks anyway: forewarned is forearmed.

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    1. Ricki - don't be put off by my attemtps, you may be more successful. I had a similar plan!

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  12. I really like that Soldenella, the shape of the petals and the color. Your rhododendrums look great.

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    1. Jason, Soldanella is a pretty little plant. Worth growing if you can get the right conditions. In winter, if snow it will pop its blooms up through the snow.

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  13. you have some lovely blooms Angie, a shame about the plants that don't make it, re your tulips, tulips and narcissus like different conditions, I only recently learnt this, tulips like to be drier during summer where as narcissus like moisture, so now I understand why tulips I planted in a very well draining area have done so well when others in damper areas have been lost, Frances

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    1. Thank you Frances - I knew the different conditions they required and thought I had provided them with adequate conditions in the containers. Obviously not!!
      The tulips will go in the front garden where it's much drier and sunnier with luck they will reappear!

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  14. Your muscari is beautiful as my is ending....so much blooming in your lovely garden...

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    1. Donna - then ending of one plant means the start of another in bloom. Spring is all good!

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  15. Tulips are certainly more precarious than daffodils. The Clematis alpina Helsingborg is very pretty and I love the white mascari. I have blue ones and will add some white next year.

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    1. Jennifer, good luck with your white Muscari, you won't be disappointed!

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